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 Post subject: Interviews
PostPosted: Tue 18. Jan 2011, 00:21 
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Interview with Jonsu from April last year. Translation done by Niko on the english Nightwish Forum.

Niko wrote:
Here's my translation of Jonsu's radio interview in YleX Iltapäivä in April 15, 2010. I means the male interviewer Ile and J means the female interviewer Jenny.


I: Our guest is… Or let’s put it this way… If this happened in 1500s I would be scared because there are two redheaded wit… women in the studio. So, our guest is Jonsu from Indica. Welcome.
- You should be scared of us also in 2000s.

J: I’ll give you a pen, so you can throw it at Ile when he gets too annoying. I: Jenny likes to throw things. Yesterday she threw scissors at me. It was a bit scary.
- Oh!

J: The blade in front. I: Fortunately it was the other end of the scissors that hit me. Otherwise there would be someone else instead of me in the studio today. J: But Jonsu, hi!
- Hi.

J: Welcome. I: And now you have the pen firmly in your hand. Soon you’ll throw it…
- Are you aggressive towards women too, Jenny?

J: No I’m not. He’s just…
- So the red ones are allies?

J: And so are the ones who wear a cap. Wait a minute… you’re not wearing a cap. I: So you’re not allies after all. But hey, you switched to English. *In English*: So should we just do this all in English? Jonsu from Finland, how has your spring gone in this fine day?
- *In Finnish*: Let’s not do this in English because right now I remember only about ten English words, so I would have to repeat myself a lot. I’ve given a lot of interviews in English lately, so let’s do this one in Finnish.

I: Okay, we’ll do this in Finnish, but you’ve started to make songs in English. In my opinion, it’s great that Indica is trying something new. Why in English?
- Actually… Damn these headphones are annoying. I hear my own voice as an echo.

I: Adjust the volume lower.
- Okay... Actually when we formed the band about eight years ago, we made songs both in Finnish and in English, if the language of the early lyrics can be called English. But we had to choose which language we will use, and we chose Finnish. We started to consider English again when Nightwish asked us to support them in their Scandinavian and European tours (in 2007). We got more foreign fans and they demanded us to make material in a language that they understand.

I: So earlier you needed a dictionary in order to write English lyrics. J: And the result was probably something like a Google translation, not very understandable.
- Our dear fans have translated some lyrics to English and you may still find some of the translations on our website. I have to admit that it’s difficult to translate lyrics. If you do it word by word, the result will probably be tragicomic.

I: So you haven’t always been completely satisfied to your English lyrics. How about old songs? Have you translated them to English for concerts outside Finland? Or will you sing some of the songs in Finnish?
- The concerts outside Finland will probably be completely in English. Our first completely English concert will be in Berlin in May 5, 2010. Welcome there all hardcore fans, we’ll need you there. In Finland the album release concert is at On the Rocks in June 3, 2010. So, when in Rome do as the Romans do.

J: Have you translated any of your Finnish hits to English?
- Yes we have. Many of them are in the forthcoming English album.

I: What’s, for example, Linnansa vanki in English? J: Prisoner in her castle?
- We have performed Linnansa vanki in English during the tour and the song is called Snow White and Her Stalker. But unfortunately this song won’t be in the forthcoming album.

I: So that song won’t become on sale now?
- No it won’t, but you may find some low-quality video of it on YouTube.

- - -

I: So, our guest in YleX Iltapäivä is Indica’s Jonsu. What’s your biggest goal right now with Indica? You switched to English, so what kind of dreams does the band have?
- We’d like to be able to tour in many countries and let as many as possible to hear the evangel of our music. And things like that. We’ll start from scratch outside Finland and we have to work hard. This year we’ve probably spent more days outside Finland than in Finland. Next Monday we’ll go to Zurich in order to perform on radio. We’ll see. It’ll be interesting.

I: And people are anxious to see you in German. Being the supporter of Nightwish probably helped you become famous in German.
- I wouldn’t say that we are famous in German, but we released the single there a couple of weeks ago and the album will be released in June. But of course the tour with Nightwish was a big opportunity for us. We had a chance to reach a lot of people. And now we’ve already been signed to some big festivals in Europe.

I: According to the cover of your single In Passing, you play theremin in the song. And for the listeners who don’t know what it is: *quotes the Finnish Wikipedia* “Theremin is an electronic instrument designed by a Russian Léon Theremin in 1919. The instrument consists of a box that has typically two antennas.” How good a theremin player are you and how do you play this instrument?
- This makes me laugh, because if the Indica girls listen to this interview they’ll probably disagree, but in my opinion, I play it very well. I played it at Tavastia when we released our previous album. The girls tried to ban me from playing theremin, because in their opinion it sounded like a cat being tortured.

J: Could you demonstrate us how it sounds?
- It’s like *imitates the sound*. Actually it sounds like a musical saw.

J: It sounds beautiful. But do you need the instrument if you can produce the same sound yourself?
- Well, it’s the coolest instrument in the world. You’ll just move your fingers in the air and the sound somehow comes out of the box. Of course, I could try to sing like that my mouth closed and move my fingers in the air. Actually, this is a really good idea. If I won’t learn to play it correctly I can produce the sound this way.

I: Just keep humming and move your fingers. Where in Finland can you take theremin classes? Is this going to become a famous instrument in the future? If someone now wonders whether to start practising guitar playing or theremin playing, which one do you recommend?
- I recommend people to take theremin classes from me. The instrument will become very popular in Finland and I’ll promise to play it at On the Rocks, no matter what the girls say.

I: Excellent. So, the new single is In Passing. What’s passing, Jonsu?
- Probably my life. At least that’s how I feel right now. A while ago I said in an interview that it feels like we released the compilation album a week ago, although the album had been released four months ago. And I feel that I was 12 years old not so long ago. So, my life is passing.

J: So the childhood is over, as (the Finnish band) PMMP sings.

- - -

I: How did it sound like? The first time… Indica… Jonsu… in English?
- It wasn’t actually the first time I heard the song, if you meant the question for me.

I: But it was the first time for us. J: Ilkka and I almost started to cry. I: Or maybe it was your aching ear that made you wanting to cry. J: It’s true that my ear aches a lot right now, but not because of Indica. Actually, listening to Indica helped. It was like sappy nectar tricked to my ear in order to push the earwax away.
- Wonderful! I’ve always said that music has a healing power.

J: Yes it has. I: So, Jenny, did Indica heal you more than the garlic you tried before, the one that you pushed to your ear - when you were 23 years old - and needed a doctor to pull it away? J: In my opinion, they won’t neutralize each other. On the contrary, they support each other: Indica and garlic in the ear. I: Please send SMS messages and tell us what you think about the song. Jonsu will be here when we read your messages, so you can also send her questions.

- - -

J: “It sounded quite bright”, writes someone. I: “It works much better in English. In Finnish it sounds too much like Maija Vilkkumaa. Now you are more unique.” J: Vege writes: “Indica rules. I like this a lot. Jonsu, please come to play it in my 50 years birthday party.
- Of course we’ll come, any time. Just contact Popgram’s Jake and we’ll come.

J: By the way, Vege continues that the birthday party is in January 31, 2013. I: At least you’ll have a lot of time to practise.
- Okay. Well, if I’m still alive then, I’ll be there, Vege. I’ll do my best.

I: Antti from Hämeenlinna writes: “Indica sounds good in English, as good as in Finnish. Jonsu has a sexy voice”. J: “English Indica sounds like the great Finnish band LAB.
- Okay. This is the first time we’ve been compared to them.

J: What kind of comparisons have you heard earlier, besides Tori Amos and Uuno?
- Usually we’ve been compared to artists like Maija Vilkkumaa, and outside Finland to Kate Bush.

I: “The song was like fairies’ jingle. It was really beautiful just like other Indica songs, but not quite as beautiful as the singer herself. Regards: your secret admirer.”
- These comments make me blush.

J: Let’s try this one. I: Read some negative feedback for a change. J: This one is actually a bit critical: “I love Indica, but this one sounds a bit weird. If you improved your pronunciation a bit, it would be better. Indica has always had beautiful lyrics, but your English doesn’t seem to be fluent enough.” How do you reply to that?
- I just say that you should have heard me singing this BEFORE I improved my pronunciation a bit.

I: “Indica works in English too: another great song from Indica. Thank you Indica and YleX.” You’re welcome. “A wonderful song. I’ve passed the time of my life during which I was able to live without worries. Now I have to stress about everything. Greetings to Jonsu”, writes Eltsu.
- Oh.

J: “Oh, when Jonsu started to sing, I got chills. I like Indica in Finnish too, but this version reached on a new level. It reminds me from LAB’s singer Ana. Wonderful, wonderful. Regards: Jonsu-looking Mea from Turku”. You have a competitor in Turku.
- Okay. Thank you, listeners, you are really cute, wonderful and sweet today. Or maybe these guys have just picked the most positive comments.

I: No, we haven’t. “Don’t tell my wife, but this wasn’t total crap at all. My work day has gone surprisingly fast”, comments Niko from a Scania truck. So, he likes this too.
- Thank you. Hugs and kisses to everyone.

I: Here’s a good question for you: “Is Indica going to perform also Sergeant Carolina (Kersantti Karoliina) in English during the European tour”, asks Sami from Imatra.
- We haven’t planned to do so, but never say never.

J: “The Baseballs should cover Indica too. A nice song”, writes someone. I: We also received the following message: “Greetings to Jonsu. There is no way that you would be allowed to play theremin at Rocks, unless you start practising it quickly. We’ll see you soon in Kirkkonummi”, comments the rest of Indica.
- *Laughs*. I’ll definitely play theremin there. I don’t remember if I already said it, but I received the third and final master tape today, so I, Tuomas, Tero and the girls are going to celebrate it in Kirkkonummi.

I: Have a nice party. Please give my regards to Tuomas and the girls. Thank you for visiting, Jonsu. J: Thank you.
- Thank you.


Source: http://forum.nightwish-world.com/index. ... ge__st__60

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 Post subject: Media
PostPosted: Thu 17. Jan 2013, 14:55 
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I decided to repost at first old (by "old" I mean before ""A Way Way" period) Finnish interviews. Not quite chronological, it can be edited later... Newer interviews and translations of TV shows with Indica girls participation will be reposted later.

Making Pahinta Tänään Video:

http://www.voice.fi/index.php?option=co ... o&cid=3840

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... wlotGK4dvg

Translation of it by Niko:

Text: Indica was founded in 2002.

Host: Whew. It’s all I can say and laugh because Tortsu and I are in Espoo’s forest on a Saturday evening at nine o’clock. We intend to go to that direction. We just got instructions to the mobile phone and we should find Indica and their video shooting team there. We try to find out why Indica shoots their video at night in a forest. Let’s go.

Host: Well, we found Indica’s Heini and Jonsu from the forest. We have followed the shootings for a while, but we want more information. Why are we on a Saturday night in Espoo’s forest?
Jonsu: Oh, I have to say that I’ve no idea. The band doesn’t even know yet what we are supposed to do in the video.

Heini: We didn’t have anything else to do on this Saturday, so we wanted to check out what is it like in a forest of Espoo and Kauniainen.

Jonsu: And we intend to have a sober Saturday. But unfortunately the crew will probably take a few drinks soon, so the band members must probably be the drivers tonight. Otherwise no one can get away from this forest.

Text: The Pahinta tänään music video was directed by Jesse Hietanen.

Jesse: I have a small request for everyone. Please try to stay on this side in order to avoid accidents, because we have a lot of power cables there. So you’re not allowed to pass this border.

Host: This night will be long for you. It’s about ten o’clock now and the shootings will probably still take several hours.

Heini: We heard that we’re going to quit the shootings when the Sun rises. So this will take a few hours.

Jonsu: Wouldn’t it be awful to read a news tomorrow morning that someone had been frozen to death here? We wouldn’t have any friends after that.

Tortsu (the cameraman): “Frozen cameraman found in Espoo’s forest.”

Jonsu: We would get prosecuted for a homicide…

Heini: In addition to all this work.

Jonsu: …and exposure.

Heini: In that case this music video would be quite tragic.

Host: Then the music video would be remembered from something else than its fineness. It would have a great background story.

Text: Indica supported Nightwish on their Scandinavian tour in 2008.

Host: How are these masks related to the video?

Heini: We thought to include some Eyes Wide Shot theme here.

Jonsu: In fact, it was the marketing phrase the director used in order to sell the idea for us.

Heini: Yes it was indeed.

Jonsu: And I think we said: “It’s a very good idea, but the band won’t be naked under the robes. But the other can be if they want to.” But I think they are wearing quite a lot of clothes.

Heini: Yes they are, but who knows what’s going to happen this night.

Host: So when the Sun rises, who knows what kind of things you can find here.

Jonsu & Heini: Yeah.

Text: Valoissa is Indica'’s fourth album.

Jonsu: Our feelings about the album?

Heini: We had a great crew making the album. They all were fully committed. We allowed Tuomas to keep two laundry days, but otherwise everyone promised to dedicate fully to the album until it’s ready.

Jonsu: I told Janne - our A&R - that I have to record vocals in that particular studio, because the atmosphere is the most important while singing. Without a good atmosphere your soul wouldn’t be fully in it. But bass and guitar can be recorded in Kerava.

Heini: Yeah.

Host: Isn’t the atmosphere as important with those instruments?

Heini: Apparently not. Damn it.

Jonsu: But we’ve always been there entertaining them and watching them behind the door.

Heini: Just like we entertained you. At Petrax we watched horror movies. So we had a great atmosphere there.

Jonsu: Yeah.

Heini: There, in a dark forest in the middle of nowhere.

Host: Did you also watch Eyes Wide Shot there at night?

Heini: No we didn’t. Let’s watch it when it’s time to record the vocals.

Jonsu: During the vocal recordings we have decided to watch at least Village and…

Heini: We also decided to watch the Orphanage.

Jonsu: Yeah, the Orphanage.

Host: Oh dear.

Text: The band was born in Northern Helsinki’s band school. Also Tiktak, Rasmus and Haloo Helsinki’s singer Elli have come from the same school.

Host: Let’s talk about the producer whose identity has been a big secret, but your record label revealed it to me. So Tuomas Holopainen from Nightwish has apparently produced your whole album.

Heini & Jonsu: Yeah.

Host: How on earth did Tuomas want to… I mean did you ask him to…

Jonsu: How on earth did he want to do it?

Heini: What a polite question!

Host: I meant that he hasn’t produced many albums for other people. That’s why I asked this.

Jonsu: Well, the idea was born during our Scandinavian tour where we supported Nightwish. We talked then and realized that our band and Tuomas had very similar visions. And we thought that our co-operation could work well.

Text: Earlier Tuomas Holopainen has produced only Nightwish and Silentium albums.

Host: The crew is walking towards us. Espoo’s night is getting even darker. We let you continue the shootings. Or actually you’ll begin the shootings with the band. Thank you very much for this interview and for letting us to follow your shootings. I wish the Sun doesn’t rise until you’ve managed to shoot everything you need.

Heini: Let’s hope for the best.

Jonsu: Now you guys could take a mask and a robe and join in.

Host: Who knows, who knows.

Jonsu: So watch the video closely.

Heini: Watch it closely.

Host: We managed to get out of the forest where Indica was shooting the video, but I got so interested about the Tuomas Holopainen case that I had to try to find him. Tuomas is in Hollola at Petrax studio, so the cameraman and I are driving to Hollola in order to find out why Tuomas decided to produce the album and what he thinks about all this.

Text: Holopainen has also composed the theme song for the Lieksa! movie, While Your Lips Are Still Red.


Host:
When you’ve listened to Indica’s earlier albums as a fan, have you noticed something that you would have done differently as a producer? And did you want to implement some of those things on this album?


Tuomas:
Of course. Everyone has their own opinions and everyone does things in their own way. I joined in this project because I felt that I might have something to give to the band. I mean that I’m not going to ruin their very unique soul landscape, but I try to bring something that in my opinion has been missing on their earlier albums. I don’t know if this will be a good or a bad thing, but I try to add my ideas to it.


Documentary of Valokeilojen Vampyyri

http://www.voice.fi/index.php?option=co ... o&cid=3840
DEAD LINK?

Translation by Niko:

Host: Indica has arrived to the shootings. It rains a lot, but the video shootings are going on anyway. Why are we here in Kauniainen at this cottage?


Heini:
We’ve arrived to this love nest where we shoot the love scene of Sirkku and Jasse from Hybrid Children.

Host: A love scene? I was told that you are shooting outdoors. Does the love scene happen outdoors?


Jonsu:
The love scene happens indoors, but we have to see how much of it we dare to include to the final video. But at least Heini and I are going to watch it.

Heini: We want to see the situation.

Host: Okay. I heard that you started the shootings in the morning in Seurasaari. Apparently it rained then too.

Jonsu: Yes it did. We had a wild gig and big audience there.

Heini: There were at least three people watching us. It was wild: it rained a lot and we played in the rain.

Host: So it was a performance scene?

Heini: Yeah.

Host: So you’ll have a gig there in this video?

Heini: Yes. It will be the last scene of the video, but we started the shootings there.

Jonsu: And Heini swam in a mud puddle.

Host: Just for fun or for the video?

Heini: I decided to swim in that mud puddle just for fun. *grins*

Host: Okay. Now I dare to guess what this video is about. That Volkswagen bus is your tour bus and your journey begins here and ends up to the gig in Seurasaari. Or I suppose the video doesn’t tell where the gig is…

Heini: Exactly.

Host: …but you shot it in Seurasaari.

Jonsu: Yes. I’d say that this is a quite realistic description of our regular weekend concert trip. It goes more or less like this.

Heini: Yes it does. All these scenes have happened a few times in real life too.

Jonsu: The video is like a documentary.

Host: So the band members are picked up from their love nests when it’s time to go somewhere to play?

Heini: Only Sirkku is picked up from a love nest, definitely not the rest of us.

Jonsu: The others would rather belong in a nunnery.

Text: The Valokeilojen vampyyri video was directed by Jesse Hietanen who has already worked with the band before.

Laura: Am I covering the Volkswagen sign?

Host: Did Jesse have some visions you didn’t want to implement? Or on the contrary, did you suggest some kind of potty humour he didn’t want to implement?

Jonsu: Yes we did.

Heini: Naturally the band would have wanted to include some potty humour to the video. But Jesse had made several different scripts, but our potty humour wouldn’t have suited to any of them. *laughs*

Host: So you didn’t think about lyrics?

Heini: Yes we did. Potty humour would have suited well to those lyrics.

Jonsu: The song is… Actually we have had quite a struggle with both the song itself and the video. I wrote this song when I was about 13 years old. And when we were making the compilation album - which by the way includes three new songs - and were considering which songs to put there, I suggested a bit more serious song and the band members definitely wanted this one and we had a long struggle. We decided to record both and choose the song later, and I have to agree that the band members’ choice is more suitable as our first single.

Heini: Yay, we were right. We managed to talk Jonsu round and in the end she agreed with us on the verge of tears. In my opinion the result is good. It’s comic, but good.

Jonsu: Yes it is. They asked me that do I take myself too serious, because I thought that I couldn’t sing the lyrics I wrote as a 13-years-old, but the result is funny.

Host: You will publish this song on your compilation album. So Jonsu didn’t have to write many new songs, because she found this old unreleased song.

Heini: Actually we all remember this song well from our early years and we thought that we definitely have to publish this on the compilation album.

Jonsu: The best thing about this is that when I told a couple of people that we’ll release this song, they were like “Oh my god, will you really record Valokeilojen vampyyri? Wonderful!”

Heini: Old fans definitely know this song.

Host: Usually when a band releases a compilation album, it means that they are buying time in order to keep a small break. Does this mean that you’re not going to publish a new album at least for a year?

Heini: Well, we haven’t planned yet when we are going to make a new album.

Jonsu: We’re not going to keep a break. One of the reasons for this compilation album was that most shops no longer have our old albums available … wait… Can I rephrase my answer?

Host: Just keep going and we’ll edit this later.

Jonsu: I wonder what I was going to say.

Heini: Are you having a blackout?

Jonsu: Are they called “back catalogs”?

Host: Yeah, if you mean the records that the band has released earlier.

Jonsu: Can I say that “most shops no longer sell back catalogs”?

Laura: Yes.

Heini: Say what you want.

Jonsu: We’re definitely not going to keep a break, but at this point the compilation album was a good…

*laughter*

Jonsu: This is difficult.

Heini: What do you try to say?

Host: So you’re not going to keep a break, but you released the compilation album anyway.

Jonsu: Our f…king recording contract says that after the fourth album there will be a compilation album!

Heini: We didn’t have a choice.

Jonsu: Just kidding. We would have had a choice, wouldn’t we?

Heini: No. *laughs*

Host: So how do you want to phrase this?

Heini: We signed the recording contract when we were kids and it includes this compilation album.

Laura: We were f…king stupid!

Host: But let’s look on the bright side. You didn’t have to make more than two or three new songs.

Host: I think it’s time to let you shoot this scene. I’m so interested about the love scene that I’m now looking forward to see it.

Heini: I’m interested about it too. Let’s unleash Jasse and Sirkku.

Jonsu: Thanks to you, and you.

Host: Thank you, too.

A Short Interview in Which Jonsu and Heini Talk About Kersantti Karoliina.

http://www.voice.fi/index.php?option=co ... =3&cid=277
DEAD LINK OR BLOCKED?

Translation by Niko

Host: Jonsu and Heini from Indica, your choice for Livenд vieraissa (“covering live”) is Popeda’s Kersantti Karoliina. I’m sure everyone wants to know, why Indica wanted to enter to the world of masculine rock ’n’ roll.

Jonsu: I have to blame our lighting technician Piispa for that. I don’t remember where we were going when we lied on the bunks in our tour bus and realized that “Oh, how about that Voice thing? What shall we play there?” And then we heard him saying “Kersantti Karoliina”.

Heini: We didn’t even negotiate about it. The decision was made immediately. It was clear that we’ll play that song.

Host: Pate sings the songs sometimes even yelling. Was it difficult for you, or actually most of you girls sing in it, but to be honest, I don’t remember exactly which ones. But was it difficult to sing Pate’s melodies?

Jonsu: The pitch was quite low and I asked the band if we could play it at a higher pitch, but they were like “but this bass riff doesn’t sound nearly as good if we play it half a pitch higher…”

Heini: Well, it wouldn’t have worked.

Jonsu: “… and it would ruin the mood of the song”. And when I said “fine then”, they said: “Drink some whiskey.”

Host: Let’s now listen to your version of Kersantti Karoliina. What was that gesture?

Heini: It meant “Oh no”.

Host: Why “oh no”?

Heini: Even we haven’t heard it yet.

Host: Well, now you will, except that we don’t listen to it here in the studio. But it will be shown on television after this interview.

some important remarks from the former forum concerning this video:

Severus
Posted 08 June 2011 - 00:01

Niko, thanks once again!!!

Probably this video is meant in an interview:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=To6lDeR8gwU

they were singing for some soldiers, probably for Finnish forces of KFOR in Kosovo, am I right?

Niko
Posted 08 June 2011 - 19:06


Yes, that's the video they were talking about. Indica has performed for Finnish peacekeepers, but this video was shot in a studio for the Finnish television channel The Voice. The girls are wearing military style clothes because the song is about a female sergeant. In a way the clothes don't match with the lyrics because in the song the narrator is a rock musician. Sergeant Karoliina is narrator's girlfriend (or wife). But I'm not complaining because the girls look so good in those clothes.



Documentary (Programme Called Musiikin Taikaa (Magic of Music)


It was aired on February 25, 2006 on the Finnish television channel MTV3.

The documentary is on Youtube in three parts:
#1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Neh5Cquu9Ls ,

#2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oe5jPhoAlDs

and #3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxxehW-pRMs

The third part is geo-blocked

translation by Niko

[part 1]

Indica: Hi! We are Indica and this is a story about us.

Jonsu: My first music-related memory is that when I was young we sang at home often. I started playing the violin because I told my mother that I want a violin. I was very determined that I would become a violinist. And my mother was excited and thought “wow, let’s buy her a violin if she knows at the age of four what she wants to do”. But in fact, I wanted to start playing the violin because I thought that violin is such a beautiful word. But later I’ve found also other nice properties of that instrument. So it all started with a violin. Nowadays piano is perhaps more familiar to me. I’ve composed all my songs by a piano.

Heini: Music came into my life when I was two years old and went to a music kindergarten. After that I naturally started to take kantele classes and went to a music class in elementary school. By the way, I learned to play the piano when I was five. And in the school I learned to play the cello and then I met Jonsu. And when I was in junior high school I slowly replaced cello by bass and later bass playing has changed from a hobby to more like a job.

Jenny: My parents sent me to music kindergarten when I was two or three years old, so it started there. We used to sing and play music at home when I was young. Music was always part of our everyday life and of course important in celebrations.

Sirkku: I started to play the piano when I was six years old. Before that I had played kantele for a while in music kindergarten. That’s how my playing career started.

Laura: My childhood was nice, full of music. I was in a music class already in elementary school. And before that I had been in music kindergarten and so on.

Sirkku: I met Jonsu for the first time when I was 14 or 15 years old. We were at Dingo’s concert and started to talk there. Later we went to the same high school. There was some band activity in the school and I remember the evening when we were hanging out in the Silkkiniitty park and Jonsu pulled me aside and asked me if I’d like to play keyboards in her band. She was very excited about it and we talked about it. That’s how it started. Then I went with Heini to Jonsu’s home to rehearse.

Sirkku: Our band’s name was Profiili (profile). It was quite a bad name and we wanted to change it. We considered names like Geysir (geyser) and Illuusia (illuusio = illusion), but weren’t satisfied to them. We decided to go to drink some coffee and decide the name. We all brought long lists of suggestions, but we didn’t find a nice name from the hundreds of candidates on those lists, and then we just built the name almost letter by letter. Indigo is a shade of blue and the -a suffix makes a word feminine in some languages such as Spanish. So the name has this aspect too. This is how we have explained it in interviews. In my opinion, it simply sounds beautiful.

Jenny: My first touch with Indica was when I was invited to the rehearsal room. Sirkku, Heini and Jonsu were there and they were playing the song called 500 Jeesusta (500 Jesuses) which isn’t a religious song despite the name. Another song we played then was Koff-illuusio (Beer illusion). I hadn’t met these girls before. They hired me as their guitarist because they didn’t have a guitarist at that point. This is how it started. We rehearsed diligently. We also practised at a youth house which was next to our rehearsal room, but I think the people didn’t like us a lot there because they used to shout after us. There were mainly undisciplined boys who played punk and since our repertoire was different genre they were always overlooking us and we were a bit scared of them. But we were persistent and passed our obstacles.

Laura: Our first rehearsals were interesting. We trained in a youth house and received death threats from young rebels. At that point playing wasn’t the main thing. Well, of course it was important, but we liked to chill out. For example, in one day we had a huge urge to practise but didn’t have a place to play, so we went to Sirkku’s home. I think Jonsu played the piano, I beat mattresses and Jenny played acoustic guitar. But it was more like having fun together than actually rehearsing.

Heini: Jonsu’s songs had basically three chords and the lyrics were about human relationships and big love stories.

[part 2]

Jenny: The band school has offered us an excellent rehearsal place. That’s important. When you have a good place to practise, you will practise more often and your skills start to improve. I’ve heard our development because we have a lot of tapes from the early years and when you listen to them and compare them to newer recordings, you hear the difference and it encourages you to continue. Mainly the band school has improved our playing skills. It’s great that they offer a place to practise.

Jonsu: We got the recording contract with the help of our manager Peter Kokljuschkin. Petteri had heard us playing in a concert. It was a Christmas concert and we had played our own Christmas song there. He got interested and we made a management deal before the recording contract. Then Jani Jalonen from Sony came to listen to our rehearsals. And Jani said that “this sounds good” and then we drank some coffee and ate pastry. Then they invited us to have an audition at Sony and everything went well.

Heini: In the beginning we used a lot of chord variations and the songs were more complex. When we went to the band school we learned to make the songs simpler, closer to pop music. Our classical background was more audible in the beginning.

Jonsu: The songs of the first album are from a rather long time scale. I wrote some of those songs when I was 12 or 13 years old. But I made changes especially to the lyrics because my thoughts had changed during those few years. But it’s an album that includes only few songs that were made at the last possible moment, which wasn’t the case with the next album. Making the debut album was a very interesting learning experience. None of us had been in the studio before. Well, I had made choir and children’s song albums earlier, but it was great to make an own album with the band.

Jonsu: The story of Scarlett is mostly from the movie and book Gone with the Wind. In my opinion, the legendary love stories like this should be kept alive. I think that for the people of my age and younger Scarlett isn’t nearly as familiar as it is to my parents and their generation. I liked to include this kind of a song to the album.

Jonsu: I think I’m often quite a blabber. Sometimes I may tell too much about myself, but I believe that you should share everything you have in mind. I suppose I’m not a typical musician then, if typical musicians are withdrawn persons who only open up in their songs. For me a bigger problem is that people ask questions like “is this song about you” and “why don’t you admit it”. But many of my lyrics are fictive stories.

[part 3]

Jonsu: We started to record Tuuliset tienoot in spring 2005. Its songs were made on a short time scale. All but one were made within six months. The only exception is the “warning song” (Varo) which is a bit older. I’ve always been a deadline person. Even if the songs are ready, I always change one verse or one line a day before going to the studio. I always feel on the last night that something in the song isn’t right. I have to admit that it was wonderful to make Tuuliset tienoot. We had the same producer as on the first album and the studio was more familiar to us. I think we all were able to give more to the album because this time we weren’t as petrified in the studio. But in a couple of mornings I went into the studio on the verge of tears wondering “what should I do with that annoying word”. But I’m quite a sensitive person.

Jonsu: Pida kädestä, the second single of our new album, is about the importance of people, especially the loved ones and how important it is to get support when you have hard times. So it’s a song for friends.

Jonsu: Being sensitive means that if I feel like crying, I cry and of course sometimes I laugh and, well, I’m not very often angry because humans are so tragicomic creatures that you can’t really be angry at them. I can’t be angry at myself either because we all are comic and innocent characters. I don’t think you have to be tough in music world. Maybe I’ve been fortunate, but we have a wonderful manager and record label and I’ve never met the awful cigar smoking record label men I’ve always been warned of.

Heini: In my opinion, our hardest times were when we practised a lot and had no idea if we ever got a recording contract or even gigs. We practised a lot, four times a week, four hours at one time. And at some point we started to think that what if it all was for nothing. Of course playing was fun, otherwise we wouldn’t have done it, but we dreamed of making an album and having gigs. So then we had a small crisis.

Laura: I have high goals. I want to improve myself as a musician and hopefully that will also improve our sound and ensemble. And I hope that I can work as a musician in the future. It is my job now and I’d like to keep it that way in the future too. Playing is the only thing I’m 100 % interested in.

Interviews, manuscript and editing: Timo Repo
Graphics: Annamaija R?ty
Filming: Tomi Pulkkinen


http://tv.nrj.fi/videodirectlink/373-il ... ndica.html



NRJ Radio Interview

It was broadcast in November 2009.

translation by Niko

M means the female interviewer Mira Kuronen and C means the male interviewer Cristal Snow who is also known as a singer and a drag queen.

M: Welcome to NRJ Iltapдivд. We wish you a happy Friday and Halloween. Cristal Snow and I are in the studio and our guest has arrived. Jonsu from Indica, happy Halloween!

- Likewise.

C: You came here… we invited you to our guest because you’re like a fairy princess.

- Oh. I thought that you would say that “because you’re so awful”.

C: No. You look like a fairy princess, so you suit very well our Halloween theme. I’ve always thought that all your band members are sweet fairy folk. M: Legendary creatures. C: Legendary creatures indeed.

- Thank you. But in my opinion horror would suit better this holiday. Perhaps something like The 69 Eyes.

C: It doesn’t go like that. Halloween is a fantasy holiday.

- Yeah. It’s funny because 5-10 years ago there were no Halloween parties in Finland, but now when I walked on the street, I saw many people dressed in Halloween costumes.

M: Oh. That’s cool. C: Do you intend to have a Halloween party?

- Actually, I’m going to a Halloween party tomorrow and I’ve been wondering if you have to wear some special costume there because…

C: Of course!

- …there wasn’t any information about the costumes in the invitation.

C: If it’s a Halloween party, of course you have to dress accordingly. You have to work on it.

- I haven’t thought anything yet. Maybe I’ll put some ketchup in my face.

C: Guess what character would suit you because you have such a red hair?

- Well?

C: You would be an awesome Little Mermaid.

- So I should wear bikinis and a trash bag with a bowknot at the bottom?

C: Exactly. I assume you would be popular in the party in that costume.

- Well, I think I still have to ponder the costume.

C: So you haven’t decided your costume yet?

- No I haven’t. I’ve never been a big fan of masquerades because I have to tog myself for every gig so now I’m like “Not again!”

C: Which fantasy costume would you like to wear if you had a lot of money and could do whatever you wanted?

- Well, I would want to be Tinker Bell if the costume included some kind of a flying vehicle on the back. It would be incredibly nice to be able to fly.

C: By the way, they’ve remodelled Tinker Bell. Disney has made Tinker Bell look like a boy. Now she has a forest costume covering the whole body. It’s awful. M: What a sacrilege! That’s injustice!

- That’s outrageous.

C: She’s no longer slightly naughty, sexy Tinker Bell. She wears a similar costume as Peter Pan and looks like a boy. I was completely disappointed. I didn’t like it at all.

- Oh.

C: Tinker Bell has to be slightly naughty and sexy.

- Maybe you could design your own naughty version of her.

C: I think I’ve already done it a couple of times. M: Most likely he will do it again. Anyway, are you a fan of horror? Do you watch horror movies?

- I like some psychological horror movies, but I’ll skip all kinds of Saws and Rings. When I was little, my friends and I liked to ask someone’s big brother to rent horror movies for us. We watched them in a dark room and were like *screams*. But when I’ve got older, my mother doesn’t protect me as much anymore, so I’ve seen so many horror stories that I don’t long for them in my spare time very often.

C: I agree. And it annoys me that modern horror movies are so cruel. They’re not entertaining. Movies like Saw are just gross. I don’t like them. I prefer different kind of horror.

- Yeah. In my opinion, movies like Rosemary’s Baby are excellent, but…

C: They are very scary. M: So you prefer old classics like…

- …I don’t like dismemberment movies.

C: Me neither. M: …the Hitchcock movies?

C: Oh, yes! The Birds by Hitchcock.

- Hitchcock is very good indeed. I usually watch movies in a way that I watch all movies of one director in a row. So I had a Hitchcock era recently and I agree they are great. They have conveniently light thrill.

C: Which Hitchcock movie is your favourite? I prefer Vertigo. I think it’s an excellent movie.

- This is a difficult question because he has so many good movies…

C: There’s deep silence in the studio! Jonsu is thinking.

- Thinking, thinking…

C: The Birds?

- Well, it’s a good movie.


C: It’s so camp and it’s even funny from time to time. It’s very well written.

- An interesting thing about Hitchcock movies is that you’re not scared after the movie. After watching a modern horror movie you’re looking behind thinking “where is the murderer”.

M: I don’t like that feeling.

- Me neither.

C: I’m going to watch Paranormal Activity tomorrow. I’ve seen the ad of the movie. It includes only the reactions of the spectators. The people are very scared in the theatre. And now I’m a bit scared to go. I’ve no idea what the movie is about or what’s going to happen in it. All I know is that people have screamed and cried while watching it.

- That reminds me of one awful party. I had a housewarming party in one flat and had a big screen on the wall. And every time I went out of the room, one wonderful boy turned it on and started to play a shocking, incredibly horrible porn video. I’m not going to describe the details, but it showed people’s reactions too. It was so awful that I almost threw the guy out of the balcony.

C: Maybe you should have done it. M: Anyway, Indica has released a compilation album. Let’s discuss it and other things later, but let’s now listen to Indica’s Valokeilojen vampyyri. This is a new song published in the compilation album.

- Yes, it is. It’s the first single.

- - -

M: Jonsu from Indica is the guest of Mira and Cristal Snow in the studio. Since we have a Halloween theme, have you ever had a supernatural experience?

- Oh, many times. Maybe the most awful and scariest thing happened when I was little and participated in a riding camp. There were ten hysterical girls in the camp and the company made the imagination to run. This is a long story, but it began when we found a skeleton of a horse. After that, all kinds of weird things happened such as the horses running away through the fences. We lived in the attic of the stall and I saw a ghost there, the basic grey thing. We all slept in the same bed on the next night. Of course someone might say that I have a beginning schizophrenia, but in my opinion it was a ghost!

C: Oh no! I think I’ve once seen a UFO.

- Really?

C: I feel that it had to be a UFO because there was a very dark cloud above a field in midsummer, but it seemed to be too solid to be a cloud. It was strange.

- Did you call somewhere?

C: No. I just stared at it. I was having a late night walk, it was probably 12 o’clock and I was walking alone by the field and thought: “What is that? It has to be a UFO”. Then I just freaked out, but I was quite young then.

- Apparently you were suicidal then. Who goes for a walk at midnight?

C: It was a bright summer night and I was young and used to run away from home. I thought it was fun.

- I see. I’ve had another scary experience too. I was home and there was a picture of my mother’s grandparents on the wall. It was thundering and completely dark outside. It was lightning and I was talking with my friend on the telephone. I said that those dead faces are staring at me in a weird way. And at the same moment a power outage striked within a radius of ten… well, at least two kilometres. All electricity was lost and the telephone went dead. I was wearing only socks and a nightdress when I went outside and started to run as fast as I could to see the friend who lived 500 metres away. At the same time, my friend had decided to come to my place by bicycle. And she was thinking: “Oh my god, who’s that sick person running there wearing only socks and a nightdress”. And when we came closer she thought: “I can’t believe this. It’s Jonsu”.

C: This is what happens when a child becomes hysteric when there’s actually no reason for concern. I liked to scare myself too when I was a kid. I liked the feeling when you have to go to pee because you’re so excited. It was fun as a kid.

- It was a wonderful feeling, but nowadays horror doesn’t feel as nice.

C: Not at all. Like you said earlier, when you’ve seen many tragedies and horror it’s not as nice anymore.

- Yeah. And we used to spread the feeling to each other when we were kids.

C: Mass hysteria.

- Once our neighbour rang the doorbell in the evening when I was home with my sister and a girl from the neighbourhood. We assumed that there’s a murderer at the door, so we patrolled in the apartment with knives. And when the parents came home we told them that we had an awful evening. “We were waiting with knives because there was a murderer wearing an ushanka at the door”. On the next day the neighbour came to ask: “why didn’t anyone answer the door yesterday evening”.

M: You’ve clearly had a lively imagination when you were kids.

- Yeah.

M: That’s charming. C: Indica released a compilation album Pahinta tдnддn on the 21st of October (2009). How does it feel that you’re so young and now you’re releasing a compilation album for the Christmas season?

- I think I need a proper autumnal depression. Old age doesn't come alone. Apparently I’ve got old.

C: No, think about it! You’re so young and have so many hits. How does it feel to have them all on the same album?

- Well… I can’t answer that. Besides, there aren’t just hits on that album. There are three new songs too. We recorded one very old song, Valokeilojen vampyyri. I wrote it when I was about 15 years old. There’s also one completely new song and one of my favourite songs from the previous studio session that wasn’t released on the previous album. Well, releasing a compilation album feels just like life in general. Sometimes it’s great, sometimes not so great.

M: You also made a music video for Valokeilojen vampyyri.

- Yes, that’s true.

C: Does it include vampires?

- It doesn’t include actual vampires, but you have to check it out because our keyboardist Sirkku is quite a vamp.

C: A seductress! M: Sounds good. What else is up with Indica?

- We’re fine. We’ll have some gigs before Christmas and then we’ll have a few-weeks break and after that, in January, February or March we’ll go to Lapland to fool around.

C: Lapland is a wonderful place to tour.

- I agree.

C: It’s the best. Well, touring is always nice, but in Lapland I somehow feel as if I was abroad and I freak out.

- That’s true. When we’re touring for example at Levi, we try to have a couple of free days…

C: For recovering?

- Yeah. It’s like being on a holiday.

C: Where’s your next gig?

- The next gig… Actually, our sweet mixer Osku called me one minute ago and said: “Jonsu, where are you? We’re waiting for you at the rehearsal room”. And I said swallowing tears: “Oh no, I’ve forgot”. But apparently he was kidding me. But… to be honest, I don’t remember where the next gig is.

M: So people should check it from your website. Is it indica.fi or what?

- Indica.fi. But at least I remember one gig that’s here (in Helsinki). I remember those gigs the best. It’s on the 11th of November at On The Rocks. We’ll offer something new and exciting there.

C: Awesome! M: So the gig list can be found on indica.fi and the compilation album Pahinta tдnддn is on sale. Thank you for the visit, Jonsu. Have a nice Halloween.

- Thank you and happy Halloween to you and all the listeners.


Interview with Jonsu on Findance.com (Making of Kadonnut Puutarha)

19th of April 2007.

http://www.findance.com/haastattelut/265/indica

Translation by Niko

Indica released their third album Kadonnut puutarha recently. I met their singer Jonsu in Helsinki. First we changed thoughts about our mutual interest, which is David Lynch’s productions from Twin Peaks to Mulholland Drive, but finally we switched to the topic of the day, which is Indica’s new album.

- When we started to make the third album, we decided to ignore all expectations and make the kind of music we would like to listen and what we long for in this world.

On the first and second album Indica was still searching for their direction.

- On the third album we thought that it doesn’t matter if it doesn’t sound like Indica, as long as we make a good album. But since the band and the songwriter are the same, the label remains the same too.

- This is the most experimental of our albums. We tried to include our feelings from last year in this album because above all, music is soul nourishment and a resting place for mind, thinks Jonsu.

Enthralling fairylikeness

Indica’s songs always seem to be about some kind of a fantasy world, but in fact the topics are closer to Jonsu’s own life.

- I never tell anything about my private life in interviews, but I write many songs about it. I also borrow stories from the lives of the people who are important to me. I get ideas from my dreams, life and anything, but I write songs only about topics that touch me personally, tells Jonsu.

Indica’s song-writing has always been under Jonsu’s responsibility and so far the other band members haven’t offered their own songs to her.

- I’ve always made our songs, and composing hasn’t been a natural thing to the others. For me, composing has been as normal as eating and sleeping. Even if I didn’t have a band, I would compose music. Composing is my mission. You should never confront people and music, but music is one of the most important things in my life.

Indica’s image is clearly distinctive from other bands and the band has certain fairylikeness in their presence.

- In my opinion, fairylikeness is enthralling. If we only had the visual resources, I would have a million ideas about things I would like to do at gigs. For example, I’d like to be able to fly during the show. When implemented well, visuality can add a lot to the music. Of course, if it’s done badly, it can make the listening experience more irritating, says Jonsu and adds that she would like to make a movie and movie music at some point.

Not afraid of guitar distortion

The producer Erno Laitinen has naturally affected to the sound of the band’s third album.

- The third album is even more a studio album as the second one. On the second album we had quite a lot of piano and strings, and I assumed that the third album would become a very natural album, but in half a year the human mind can change a lot and I no longer wanted to make acoustic music.

Jonsu mentions that sometimes the drummer and guitarist were thrown out of the studio.

- Surprisingly, I started to long for a drum machine to some songs. And it started to feel annoying that we filled every part of every song and included at least eight distortion guitars to every chorus. On this album we decided to strip the songs completely and pondered what we really needed in each song. The conclusion was that we didn’t want to include even guitar in a couple of songs. The songs got more space and we found the right atmosphere from completely different things as earlier when we just used the methods we had got used to.

When it comes to sound, Indica has no boundaries. Anything can be used in their tonal world.

- It’s total nonsense that all songs should sound similar. Most of the albums I listen to are annoyingly consistent.

- Helmet, for example, is from a completely different world than the first song, but it doesn’t bother me. The songs of this album are about feelings and thoughts of certain time period. And the human being changes a lot depending on the day and situation. I often feel that I wake up in someone else’s brain, and it can happen also during the day. So I don’t feel that the songs should sound consistent in any way.

Helmet is an interesting song indeed because it immediately reminded me of the tonal worlds of David Lynch and Angelo Badalamenti.

- Before we started to make that song, I told the producer that I want those snaps and some Twin Peaks feeling. By the way, it was extremely difficult to make the snapping sound good, laughs Jonsu.


The original text: Antti Niemel?


Interview 10th of September 2008 (Scandinavian Tour with Nightwish and Making of Valoissa).

It was published on YouTube on the 10th of September 2008, a week before the release of the Valoissa album.

The video is in four parts:

#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJfQMBMQslQ

#2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MhBuNyzxuU

#3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMLFQBE_2AI

#4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7tQ-Qyoz7s

translation by Niko

Text: About the winter tour of Nightwish and Indica.

What did you think about the encounter of different genres and fans?

Jonsu: It was probably our biggest concern.

Heini: We had considered having shields on stage, just in case people started to throw tomatoes at us.

Jonsu: Yeah. And we had a deal with Tuomas. He promised to watch all our gigs close to the stage and catch all the tomatoes. It was exciting because, as far as I know, Nightwish had earlier had mainly heavy metal and hard rock bands as their supporters. It was a very positive surprise, especially in the foreign countries where we were twice as nervous because it was the first time we made music in English. So it was a completely new challenge. The trip was very interesting and, in fact, today I replied to one Danish fan about the date of our album release concert, which was rescheduled a couple of weeks earlier, on the 27th of September (2008). On the tour we got foreign fans that have now come to watch our gigs in Finland. So the tour was a very positive experience.

What are your most uppermost memories of that tour?

Heini: It was a very good trip. It was probably the most pleasant tour we’ve had. It’s always nice to tour with another band in a bigger group.

Jonsu: We’ve already heard all the stories of each other, always the same jokes, ho-hum.

Heini: So we didn’t have to listen to our own stories once again.

Jonsu: And Nightwish is a group of incredibly nice people.

Heini: Including the crew.

Jonsu: Yeah, including their crew. The band and the rest of the group around them are so warm and down-to-earth people.

Heini: So we would be willing to tour with them again.

Where did you get the idea to translate your songs into English?

Jonsu: We decided it when Tuomas asked if we’d like to support them on the Scandinavian tour. It was quite obvious that we would perform in English in other Nordic countries… and Denmark, and in Finnish only in Finland. It was a very funny process. I knew from the beginning that there is no sense to translate the songs literally because they would be cheap copies of the original versions. I wrote the lyrics with a New Yorker poet Ronny Winter and I’m very satisfied with the result. It was challenging, but it was a good learning-experience. In my opinion, both Finnish and English languages have their own strengths. The English language is…

Heini: In my opinion, it’s a lot swingier.

Jonsu: It’s swingier and more vibrant. In my opinion, some songs sound better in English and I’d like to sing them always in English, while some songs work better in Finnish. It’s difficult to say at the moment, which one would be my favourite language.

Have you performed any English songs in Finland?

Heini: No we haven’t. We had never had an English gig before.

Jonsu: We went straight to ice-stadiums. My pulse was probably 300 before the first English gig. And since we had performed those songs in Finnish for years, I thought: “Oh God, what if I start to sing in Finnish” and so on. And after the tour, I accidentally started to sing some chorus in English in Finland and the girls sneered at me. But the good thing was that no one had heard the English songs before, so I had a chance to sing whatever came into my mind if I forgot the lyrics of some verse, and nobody noticed anything. In Finland we have to be more careful.

Heini: There you didn’t have that risk.

[part 2]

Jonsu: In the beginning this album seemed to be doomed because I had just moved to a new flat, to the third floor, and when I started to compose, after playing about three chords I heard rabid knocking at my door. I wondered: “Who’s coming here?” because I had just told everyone: “I’m going to spend January composing music, so please don’t disturb me.” But it turned out to be my neighbour from the sixth floor. It was half past seven in the evening, and the neighbour said: “If it’s absolutely necessary for you to play the keyboards, could you please do it earlier in the day.” I was like “fine”, took the electric piano with me and went to our rehearsal place. After that, I fortunately didn’t get more complaints from my neighbours because it would be awful to cause suffering with my music. Well, maybe it does that to someone anyway.

Heini: Maybe we’ve done that too.

Jonsu: Yeah. But the idea about the co-operation was born during the tour.

*Heini nods*

Jonsu: I’m waiting for you to say something for a while. Now I’m talking like *blah-blah*.

Heini: You talk so quickly and so much that you already crystallized everything.

Jonsu: But now it’s your turn. I’m breathless.

Heini: I don’t think I have anything to add.

Jonsu: Okay.

Heini: Besides, I already forgot the question.

Jonsu: It happens quite often to me too.

So you got the idea about the co-operation during the tour. How did you make it concrete?

Jonsu: I don’t remember who it was, but someone suggested it in a bar…

Heini: Early in the morning.

Jonsu: And everyone just said: “yes, yes, chin-chin”.

Heini: “A very good idea. Let’s do it right now.”

Jonsu: It doesn’t happen often with the ideas born in a bar, but this time everyone agreed with it in the next morning. We talked about music, or actually had already talked quite a lot about music and our music and our idols, favourite bands and goals for the next album. Tuomas had very good ideas and we noticed that our communication worked exceptionally well. We exchanged ideas and the discussion was very inspiring. So the co-operation started very well from the beginning and it became clear that “this will be the next producer”. Then, after the tour… wait a minute… we came back right before Christmas and I hadn’t written any new songs at that point…

Heini: We were in a hurry. Didn’t you have just one month for song-writing before the scheduled training session with Tuomas at the rehearsal room?

Jonsu: Yeah. And I had said: “With this album we won’t haste or make any compromises”. And I think I had said that I need to be three months at home without meeting or rehearsing with the others. But after one week of composing I started to get calls: “Well, what have you done? Are they quick? What are they like? Are they slow? Come to play, play at least something, at least one chorus.” And I was like “whatever”. But making this album was easy. Somehow the songs became ready in January and a few songs were left out of the album. Then we went to the rehearsal room and lived there… at first we trained with the band and then Tuomas came there too and we practically lived there one week 24/7. Then we made the demo album and after that we had quite a clear vision about the album.

Heini: In my opinion, this album was probably more ready than the earlier albums before we went to the studio. Everything was pretty clear at that point.

Jonsu: That’s true. And we had fine-tuned everything and I’d say that this was the first album in which the band members were co-producers, and I’m very pleased that we sat on the bench in the studio all the time.

Heini: Whining.

Jonsu: Yeah, whining. That way the album sounds more precisely like the band. And of course, we got incredibly great input from Tuomas to this album. So when the album became ready, the band was pleased with the result.

Text: About Pahinta tänään, the first single of the Valoissa album.

Where did the heavy sound come to the album?

Heini: In my opinion, on this album we’ve moved towards both extremities. It has both more sensitive and harder songs as the earlier albums. We sought deeper sounds, so maybe that’s where it came from.

Jonsu: Yeah. I think the first single made people think: “Wait a minute, will they make a very hard album?” But the second single, Valoissa, will be completely different. We’re not making a heavy metal album. Pahinta tдnддn is probably one of its hardest songs.

Heini: And some have commented that this is our most picturesque album.

Jonsu: That’s true. And earlier today I had to describe the new album and tell how it differs from the previous album. But I’m still so attached to the album after working on it half a year that it’s probably easier for an outsider to tell what differences they find. And it was wonderful when the journalist told me: “In my opinion your new album includes some influences from ethno music, it’s more orchestral and dramatic…” and I think it also included the extremities saying that there’s a bigger contrast between the songs. I said: “Wonderful! I know that I will be asked this today, so can I use your description?” I think it’s true.

Heini: Yes. That’s the correct answer.

Jonsu: Elä includes some influences from ethno music and so on. So, outsiders are often much smarter in their reviews.

[part 3]

Jonsu: Once Indica has also been compared to Smurffit.*)

Heini: That’s probably the best comparison. Your voice has been compared to their voice.

Jonsu: Yeah. I just said: “That’s good. Smurffit has sold platinum for 20 years in a row.” Well, maybe not literally 20 years, but still. So apparently we’ll be fine.

Heini: It’s great that our whole band is anxiously waiting for the tour. We’re almost counting minutes for the album release concert at Tavastia. We will rehearse a lot before the concert. For example, this week we’ve spent all nights at the rehearsal room practising the new songs.

Jonsu: Yeah. We had a three-week vacation before this and now I’m anxious to play again. I decided that I wouldn’t even touch any instrument during the three-week break, but somehow the vacation went in a way that I spent at least two weeks in music shops.

Heini: You called me in every other day and told me what you had bought. “Now I have a new, fine Gretsch guitar. It’s so cool.” And once you had a new amplifier and whatever.

Jonsu: They were so good that I couldn’t resist buying them.

That’s how it goes. How did you spend your vacation, Heini?

Heini: In fact, I seriously spent my vacation… We get 20 e-mails… Our band has a collective e-mail address…

Jonsu: I’m sorry about this.

Heini: … and we get messages from our associates and invitations to interviews and whatever. We receive a huge amount of e-mail at the moment and I spent seriously almost the whole time answering the messages, so I didn’t have much of a vacation.

Jonsu: Heini stayed in Finland as the representative of the band.

Heini: Yeah, I was on call here.

Jonsu: I arrogantly notified that I wouldn’t keep the phone or computer on - well, I had the phone on - and Heini asked me to buy an old Rickenbacker for her, but unfortunately it didn’t happen. The customs fees are absurd. So, if someone is going to buy instruments abroad, remember to add 26 % to the price, plus a million thousand euros for baggage fees. So I wonder if it became any… Well, I found things I haven’t found in Finland, but I’m not sure if it became any cheaper.

Heini: What patterns shall we have?

Jonsu: I have to admit that I haven’t thought at all what to wear at the album release concert. I’ve no information from the costumes front.

Heini: No news at the moment, maybe later.

Jonsu: Anne-Mari Pahkala made us great costumes for our latest video Pahinta tänään. And she has made some of our earlier costumes too. She’s very talented. But I don’t know. I have to think. We’ll find a clever solution.

[part 4]

Jonsu: I have to admit that once people tried to force me to sing in that game. They asked: “Can you sing it even yourself?” But when I took the mic, the machine broke down. That was the only time I’ve tried SingStar. We were supposed to get SingStars by mail, but we’re still waiting.

Heini: We haven’t got them yet.

Jonsu: Greetings to Playstation Sweden.

Heini: In fact, I’ve never seen the SingStar game physically. I’ve only seen it on television. So it’s not familiar to me.

Oh no. This is…

Jonsu: Exactly! The musicians don’t get the game. By the way, I have to admit that the musicians haven’t even received the new album yet, although we’ve seen someone having the promotional copy already. Greetings to Sony BMG.

Heini: I e-mailed our record label today: “Give the album to us too.”

Jonsu: Good. The same thing has happened with all of our albums. I don’t have any of them on my shelf because even if I have only one copy, some of our associates takes it away claiming that he/she needs it more than I do.

Heini: Yeah.

Have you any idea what you’ve caused with your SingStar songs?

Heini: No. Please tell us.

Jonsu: Have we caused traumas?

You have caused many traumas, especially the SingStar sessions at 5 o’clock in the morning at parties or other meetings in apartment houses.

Heini: Oh no!

Jonsu: I’m deeply sorry, especially for the neighbours.

Heini: But maybe it’s not that dangerous.

How about other music games? Have you played any?

Heini: I haven’t played anything else than (the Finnish board game) Musiikki Alias.

Jonsu: We played it in the bus.

Heini: Yeah. It’s probably the only music game we’ve played.

Jonsu: Yes. In fact, I’ve never played any computer game a lot.

Heini: Me neither. It’s a completely new sport to me, except that I played Nintendo Mario Bros when I was little.

Jonsu: That’s true. I played it too.

Only when you were little? Not anymore?

Heini: There are no Nintendo game consoles anymore. Or maybe there are, but none of my friends have any, so I have no place to try it.


*) Smurffit (The Smurfs) is a Finnish series of children’s song albums that contain parody versions of popular songs. By the way, they have parodied Indica too. Haaveilusmurffi (Dreamy Smurf) is a parody of Ikuinen virta. You can listen to a part of it here

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7tQ-Qyoz7s

(beginning at 4:53). The video has nothing to do with the song.


Indica Interview in Kaivari 2005

video with with translation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyCvAtixVt0

Indica - Lakinlaskijaiset Interview 2006

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5fPWJNJ ... re=related

transaltion by Niko

Interview was made on the 30th of September 2006 at Dipoli where Indica performed in a student party.

…if Indica and (the former Finnish girl band) Tiktak had a fight?

Sirkku: The answer is Laura. She hits very hard… I mean the drums.

Sirkku: I study here and I’ve worn the cap (of an engineering student) in some events. As always, even in this event someone asked if I’m really an engineering student. Yes I am.

Jonsu: People wonder: “Has that blockhead really managed to enter at the Helsinki University of Technology?” Yes she has.

…if you were spirits of the woods?

Jonsu: Laura would be an evil witch.

Heini: I would be a wood nymph.

…if you weren’t rock stars?

Jonsu: We would eat crisp bread without butter. Now we can put some butter on it.

Laura: And on holidays we also have cheese.

The meaning of life?

Jenny: To find the meaning of life.

Jonsu: To do good often and do harm seldom.

Heini: Let’s stick with that answer.

The most annoying question ever?

Jonsu: I’ve written on our website that my star sign is Capricorn, but still it’s asked there every day.

Jonsu: “Are you single” is probably the roughest question I’ve been asked.

Jonsu: It’s been nice, but I’m looking forward to autumn and darkness. Maybe I’ll stay tomorrow under the blanket wearing wool socks.

…your relationship with forest?

Jonsu: It’s all right. We still have a good relationship.

Laura: We haven’t been kicked out.

Laura: All confirmed gigs are on the tour dates page of Indica’s website. You can check them there because we don’t necessarily know them all even ourselves.

What do you think about all this?

Jonsu: Fantastic, awesome.

Sirkku: Very awesome indeed.

(perhaps Jenny): Life is fun.

(perhaps the interviewer): Great.

Jonsu: But I’m very strong.

Sirkku: You can always try to find out whether she’s single or not.

Jonsu: I wish luck for the attempts.


Indica: SonyBMG: Haastattelu

2008?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDAHB1qVVcQ

Transaltion by Nico

I tried to cut out most of the piffle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDAHB1qVVcQ said:
How was it to work with a legend like Tuomas Holopainen, and what new things do you feel that brought to your making music?

-It was awesome working with Tuomas. It was lovely to have a totally fresh team doing things with enthusiasm. The process of making the album (Valoissa) lasted half a year and involved a lot of perfecting the sound and feel of the songs. I think that at least in the band's opinion, this is the one album that most sounds like Indica.

Over the years, you've seemed to grow as artists a lot. Am I completely off the mark in my assertion?

-I wouldn't say that. During the making of each album, the band grows and learns - at least we'd like to think so; the public may occasionally differ. I don't know, maybe Indica has now made the 4th grade.


Style/Dressing Interview of Jonsu.16.1.2006

http://ellit.fi/muoti-ja-kauneus/muoti/ ... laja-jonsu

Transaltion by Nico

http://ellit.fi/muoti-ja-kauneus/muoti/ ... laja-jonsu said:

Describe you style

-I dress according to the situation. On gigs I like to wear something fantastic or old-fashioned and imaginative. At home and in the bus during gig trips pajamas and sweat pants rock. Woollen socks are one of my favorite clothing accessories.

Where do you shop?

-I don't keep shopping in any particular place. I often make great discoveries from old cellars and closets. Some of my clothes I design by myself. I also go to flea markets.

Your best find?

-My best find came from the Finnish National Opera's costume storage. It's a lovely ballet dress from Swan Lake.

Your clothing "trademark"?

-It's hard to name one. It could be tulle and skirts. And of course imagination!

How much do you follow current fashions?

-I don't. By keeping your eyes and ears open you may unconsciously pick up things from your environment.

What kind of style can't you tolerate?

-There's no style I couldn't tolerate. I dress my way, and for all I care people can go around naked, if that strikes their fancy.

What's your next acquisition?

-I don't think I need any clothes right now. Probably I'll get a new record, or go on a holiday.

How do you think you'll dress in 20 years?

-I believe I'll dress comfortably and colourfully. Clothes affect one's mood so much, and dressing in my own way keeps my mind keen.


Interview by iltasanomat.fi (The End of 2007)

http://www.iltasanomat.fi/viihde/art-1288337094749.html

transaltion by Nico

a "news" piece of a "drug band stealing the name of Indica". Basically it's a run-of-the-mill yellow press story. The interviewee is Jonsu again.

http://www.iltasanomat.fi/viihde/art-1288337094749.html said:

Indica was surprised yesterday to hear of an Irish reggae band using their name. The Irish band seems rather positivie towards drugs, since their logo has a leaf of cannabis in it.

-So we're a hemp band now, the singer Jonsu laughs upon hearing the news.

Upon further reflection she's not too happy about drugs being related to the name of Indica.

-A person's choices are their own business. I'm not positive towards drugs, nor do I use them. I've seen so many examples of the results that I have no need to mess around with drugs.

Jonsu isn't certain, how much the Irish band's choice of name will cause harm to her band. Indica has thus far made only Finnish albums, but touring Scandinavia with Nightwish has brought them listeners from outside Finland.

-I doubt the name thing matters right now, but in the future it may cause confusion. I'll have to think about it.

Fortunately the Irish band doesn't have a recording deal yet, and they've made no albums. If the name becomes an issue, the Finnish Indica has the upper hand due to their long recording history. For now the thing the Irish Indica has is a Facebook page.

-I've never noticed it, because I don't use facebook. I used it for a while and became distressed, because it felt like I'd landed in one giant sewing bee. I got an enormous number of messages in a short amount of time and I felt like I had to answer them all. I removed my account and warned the rest of the band about it.

Mistä löytyisi Pikku Myy? 17.08.2007.

http://www.juoni.net/taide-ja-viihde/mi ... pikku-myy/

Transaltion by Nico

The start is piffle about the circumstances of the interview. Laura and Jenny will be playing a game of pairs, while the others will focus on answering some questions. The rather obvious key: H=Heini, J=Jonsu, S=Sirkku.

http://www.juoni.net/taide-ja-viihde/mi ... -pikku-myy said:

Do you often forget things?

J: I often forget little things. A while ago I paid for some strawberries but forgot to take them with me. One time I left home without remembering to close the door. It'd be very gloomy to forget my diary someplace.

H: But the funniest thing happened to Sirkku.

S: That's right, I forgot to show up for our gold record awarding. I didn't remember the occasion at all and I was walking my dog when someone from the record label called to ask me where I was right before the awarding ceremony.

Have you ever experienced (any other) awkward situations due to bad memory?

H: In the music business you meet a lot of people. Sometimes you don't remember people even if you've talked to them before. Sometimes you remember a person's face but not their name. Then you just try to keep up the conversation while fishing for further information on the person you're talking to.

S: I have a twin sister. Sometimes one of her friends starts talking to me and I have no idea whether I should remember them or not.

J: On gigs we meet a lot of people who assume that we remember them. Especially bouncers and reporters aged between 40 and 50 years are so numerous and look so much the same to me that there's no way for me to remember them all. Laura has very good memory for detail. She remembers details about all our gig sites. I don't understand it, because I'm so absent-minded myself. I wonder if I should start practicing my memory?

Did you make any nice memories last week or last year?

J: I was at a friend's wedding last week. That was nice.

H: I relaxed at a cabin. It was great to have some time just for myself for once.

S: I spent my birthday with my family, which made for some nice memories. And thinking about last year, I think we threw a lot of splendid gigs during the year 2006. Especially the one at Provinssirock has stayed with me.

How about special and red-letter days? Did you remember Mother's Day in May?

H&S: Yes we did.

J: Actually I didn't. But when you really think about it, is remembering so important? My grandma suffered from dementia yet she was probably the happiest person on Earth. I've noticed there's a lot of people who keep reminiscing and repeating their past. I don't quite understand that.

Coming back to this moment, what makes this summer memorable?

H: This summer has gone by really fast. Thus far I haven't come across a mind-numbing apex, so it's hard to name any one instance. Let's keep waiting for something special to happen.

As far as the game was concerned, Jenny had better memory than Laura.


http://www.voice.fi/musiikki/nain-indic ... naa/1/8914

Translation by Nico

This one is Jonsu's answer to the question: what would Indica do if they won the lottery for Ђ6.9M?

http://www.voice.fi/musiikki/nain-indic ... naa/1/8914 said:

-Of course we'd use the money to fund Indica. We might go on a tour somewhere and then we'd throw a really good party to our fans.

According to Jonsu the band would buy some additional instruments and other necessary stuff. She also says that she envied the props she saw on a gig of Muse.

-I eyed the props and thought to myself: damn, those things must be worth a fair few thousands. Some of the jackpot might go into stuff like that.



2005 Interview with Sirkku and Jenny

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KR-INtf_ ... e=youtu.be

Translation by Nico

Key: I=interviewer, J=Jenny, S=Sirkku.

I: How are you?

S: Hi. Very good. I'm a bit anxious yet excited about the upcoming gig. The weather is a tad cold, but I'm sure the sun will start shining.

J: Yes, let's believe in that.

I: Have you made an appearance in Kaivari before?

J: No, we haven't.

S: We've been here only to see some gigs. It's good to be on this side of the stage this time.

I: Do you have a favorite artist among the ones here today?

J: I'll see any artist with interest. They all have their own thing. We'll have to see how much our schedule has wiggling room.

I: What kind of gig summer are you looking at?

S: When we're not on gigs, we'll be in the studio. We'll spend June constructing the new songs, and July is already booked full (of gigs). There will little time to stay at home. It's nice to travel for a change.

I: So you'll be sending postcards to relatives from around Finland?

J: Yeah, we'll see if we can find the time to go to the post office.

I: You have lots of festival gig coming up?

S: Yes, for example Ruisrock.

J: During midsummer we'll be at Kalajoen Juhannus, then there's Ilosaarirock, and smaller festivals in different places. We'll get to be on stage enough.

I: What are your feelings and expectations about the upcoming big festivals?

J: It's always great to go up on a big stage, after an autumn and winter of touring tiny, little clubs. Of course the clubs have an atmosphere of their own, too. The balance of the big stages during summer is nice. And then there's the vibe of everyone having a great time. If the sun will indulge us with its presence, everything's going to be fine.

I: So you're making a new album in the studio?

S: Yes, it'll come out somewhere around the end of the year. We've played some new material on gigs already, and the reception has been good. It's nice to see that people like the new stuff.

I: How would you describe the new material? In what way is it different from your first album?

S: It's a bit early for speculation. We'll see that later.

I: I visited your guestbook yesterday. Some fan had raised the question about your non-public surnames. Is there a purpose behind this? Do you want to stay anonymous?

S: It gives us a measure of privacy.

J: It's kind of a security thing.

S: We have such ugly surnames that we don't dare make them public.

J: Yeah, that's the real reason.

I: Are you going to see some gigs this summer?

S: We plan to see Kotiteollisuus and Terдsbetoni at Aitoon Kirkastusjuhlat.

J: I think The Ark is coming to Ankkarock?

S: Yes.

J: That one I must definitely see.

S: I'd have wanted to see Velvet Revolver in Ruisrock, but at least there will be Hanoi Rocks and some other great artists.

I: Today is Helsinki Day. What's the significance of Helsinki to you personally?

J: It's always been my home city. I've never been able to think about moving far away from here, at least in Finland. I don't know about other countries. This is a nice city; we have everything here. And we have the sea!

S: I'm actually from Espoo, but Helsinki is still an important city to me. I spend half of my time here.

I: Thank you for the interview, and good luck with gigs.

J&S: Thank you.

to be continued - it only the beginning of reposting this topic of the former forum.

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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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PostPosted: Thu 17. Jan 2013, 17:38 
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GJ Severus! I'll try to contribute something newish.


*****

Here's a little cosmetology-related interview of Jonsu&Sirkku from Keski-Uusimaa (a Finnish newspaper) from some time ago that was made right before Christmas (I think) at a cosmetologist's (named Sonja Auvinen-Alban) practice.


Is it nicer to wake up with diamonds in your lashes?

J: Yes. Well-done lashes and nails help the everyday life in this business. I'd say that occasional vanity is permissible for a woman. It's relaxing.

Visuality is important. Jonsu is a regular customer of Sonja Auvinen-Alban.

J: Sonja is a great person. We share things like grief over dead pets with her.

S: We trust Sonja.

The Indica ladies had the photo shootout for their upcoming album ahead in a few days, so everything needed to be in order. The treatment also provided a moment of respite amidst the excitement over the upcoming album and gigs. They've had insane withdrawal symptoms due to the long break in gigs. The name of the new album can't be revealed yet.

J: The trip to Tuusula brought something yellow to my nails. That may hint to the name of the new album.

Sonja Auvinen-Alba was going to give some sort of Bambi-look to Jonsu and Sirkku. The editorial staff thinks that the result meshes nicely with the image of the mystic-romantic pop-rock band, a description thought up by the press years ago due to Indica's mystical, nature-inspired lyrics.

In cosmetics they value ethically sustainable things.

J: Organic cometics is important for us. You should know what you're sticking into your eyes.

Many remember Indica from their first album and hit Ikuinen Virta. The album lasted over 30 weeks on the official Finnish charts and sold more than 30000 copies. The band combines pop, rock, exotic instruments and Finnish melancholy. Indica also has toured twice with Nightwish, while making 2 gold records and several top 10 singles. In summer 2010 they released an English album. A Way Away gets a successor in the spring through Nuclear Blast, a German record label.

J: Drums and bass were recorded in Hollola, and everything else was recorded in Berlin. The album is more pop and groovy than before. It's also more buoyant, since the hard times have now passed.

Indica had its 11th birthday in the autumn. The band was founded in 2001 by 5 girls with 1 thing in common: a burning passion, faith, and love for music. And they're best friends with each other.

S: The band is the longest relationship in our lives.

*****


In Etelä-Suomen Sanomat (another Finnish newspaper) there was a piece on the quality of food at Finnish service stations. Here's what Jonsu said on the subject:

I'd rate our on-the-road eating an 8- (*) - although compared to some of our roadies that'd be a 10+. One of our technicians even picks the pickles out of his hamburgers, because they're vegetables. I still don't think that junk food is all bad. If someone keeps consuming nothing but vegetable shakes, their body will probably forget how to digest a pizza.

(*): on a scale from 4 to 10, I assume.

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Thanks a lot, Nico!

Now I continue

Indica Girls in Different TV Shows



Jonsu in the Programme Cooking Star Dinner

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dge1MIlW ... Yw&index=9

translation by Niko

Obviously at least some of those sarcastic comments have been added to the audio track later.
the commentator’s dialogue in italics.

Today Jonsu will paddle a mystic cook in her kitchen.

At the door

Jonsu: Hi, welcome in.

Hi, thanks.

An introduction

Jonsu is Indica’s singer and songwriter. She has composed music from child and her first idols were humbly Mozart and Chopin. Later violin playing Jonsu got interested about rock music and has already released five albums with her band Indica. Musically Jonsu is multitalented, but apparently her relationship with cooking isn’t as warm. Or is it Jonsu?

Jonsu: I’m not saying that I would hate cooking, but I just could name hundred things that are more interesting.

At the grocery shop

Jonsu and I go to a grocery shop in order to buy the raw materials for this mostly vegetarian meal. She took the shopping list with her, and also something else.

Jonsu :It says: “asparagus and water at full power, about five minutes. Add salt to water before asparagus.”


You don’t eat red meat nowadays, but have you ever been a full vegetarian?


Jonsu: I tried at some point. I wanted to be a vegetarian. But I changed my whole dietary in the same day (I see.) and got a huge soya allergy. (Oops.) I had a meeting at the record company and my lips had swallowed three times bigger. I sent them an SMS and told that don’t worry, I haven’t taken silicone lips. (Silicone lips? Oh dear.) My eyes looked bad too. Now I try to be a semi-vegetarian. (Better so.)

How did you choose this particular menu for your guests?

Jonsu: I want my guest to feel good.

(That’s great.)

That’s why I’ll serve them this drink. They all may not like it, but we’ll see.

(It must be healthy.)

For a dessert I’ll give the same what I got as a kid when I had a birthday… candy. I received a big packet of Indica candies from Germany and don’t know what to do with them, so I’ll let Jari, Sikke and Jone eat them.

Indica candies? You must be on top of the rock world.

Jonsu: I think they are cute. They are red hearts in small wrappers.

(Cute indeed.)

Jonsu: Every pesto tastes like pesto, well maybe there are some minor differences. I don’t even smoke, so maybe the others just have worse sense of taste.

(Or maybe just worse taste.)

But in my opinion all pestos taste good.

Saleswoman: Hi.

Jonsu: Hi.

Saleswoman: Shall I put this asparagus to a plastic bag?

Jonsu: It’s not necessary.

(Why bother?)

Are they heavy?

Jonsu: Yes they are. I will never again buy too much food. But I’m able to carry these. I have strong biceps because I’ve carried instruments my whole life.

(You don’t look muscular. But the bags are packed and carried, so let’s go back to Jonsu’s place.)

At the house

Apparently you’ll eat here?

Jonsu: Yes. I thought that we would eat here.

(Yes.)

Salt and pepper are already on the table, so if I fail with the meal they can use those to cover the taste.

(Cover the taste?)

In the kitchen

Oh no!

(What?)

Sorry, this is a bit messy. Apparently I’ve cooked something that has had cheese.

(Pizza, perhaps.)

Pizza, perhaps. Why don’t you annoyances go there? Return air, and let’s set it to 225 °C. Or should I set it to the maximum? Potatoes can’t be too hot, can they?

(I wouldn’t set it to the maximum.)

I’ll set it to 225 °C. When I’m cooking, I trust my intuition and I feel that it’s the correct amount.

(Okay.)

The drink


So first I’ll make this “live 100 years” drink. You choose its materials by going to a shop and buying the most healthy and wonderful materials, all kinds of berries, fruits and vegetables. And then you just put them to the blender. (Sounds interesting.) Some parsley, then some salad and a grapefruit…


(A grapefruit?)


Just in the case if someone doesn’t like the taste of parsley. The grapefruit will cover it. And then I’ll put some carrots and tomatoes.


(Oh lord!)


My mother likes this kind of food.

(So it’s inherited.)

She and the boy next door like this.

(I see.)

And even if the taste isn’t entirely perfect, remember that this will help you live 100 years.

(What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.)

Okay, now I’ll taste it although I usually don’t taste food while making it. This tastes…

(Well?)

…very good.

(Really? Nice to hear.)

In the kitchen

Fortunately Jonsu is better as a singer than she is as an actress or cook, aren’t you Jonsu?
Jonsu: Singing and songwriting are more familiar to me.

(You shouldn’t cut the potatoes on the oven plate.)

If these potatoes don’t work, I’ll get angry.

(Don’t get angry at potatoes.)

I’m most worried that I don’t have enough time to make all these. What are you [the blender] doing?!?

(It’s blending.)

The guests arrive

Now the guests are at the door and the four stars dinner can begin.

Jonsu: You can’t succeed in everything you do, not even in almost everything you do.

At the table


Jonsu: The theme for the evening is heart and love, because everyone likes love.

Jonsu: It [the spilling of wine] was one of the signs that say: “Jonsu, don’t cook”.

Jonsu: Sorry, I want to fill my own glass first.

Jari: Are you nervous?

Jonsu: Yes I am. This drink is called “Live 100 years”. I’ll tell you how to make it. It will increase your metabolism and it gives you so much energy that you don’t have to eat any vegetables for a week.

In the kitchen

Jonsu, did the guests like the starter?

Jonsu: The starter seemed to get positive feedback.

Jonsu: Then the parsley. For some reason, when you start cooking you’ll get something else in your mind and you forget that you are cooking. But this one has so little scorch that it’s not a problem. I’ve decided to put some cream, butter, a bit of this, a couple of spoonfuls of that, salt… and we would need white wine too. I wonder if it was impolite to steal the white wine bottle from the table.

(I suppose not.)

(Oops, there goes the wine, but it will go for a good purpose.)

Jonsu: This dollop should be just enough.

Talking to the guests

Jonsu: Do you like filled mushrooms?

Jone: Absolutely.

Sikke: What’s inside?

Jonsu: Shh. I’ll bring something before them, because you look hungry. I’ll bring the mushrooms a bit later.

Sikke: Okay.

Jonsu: Where are the mushrooms?

Jari: Can’t you find the mushrooms?

Jonsu: I found them! Just a minute.

Jari: Were they in the oven?

Jonsu: Are you hungry?

The guests: Yes we are.

At the table


Jonsu: I was nervous about this white wine sauce, because I cooked it for the first time.

Jari: It’s wonderful.

In the kitchen

What are the ladies doing in the kitchen?

Jonsu: We are making filled mushrooms and we are deciding whether to add only Aura cheese or also Creme Bonjour cheese.

Sikke: I suggest not putting both in the same mushroom. Make different versions and ask the guest which one they want. This is a good amount.

Jonsu: You’ve done excellent work.

Sikke: I have an excellent apprentice.

Sikke: Did you douse the mushrooms in vinegar water before putting them to oven in order to get rid of all worms?

Jonsu: Are you kidding or do you really have to do that? Sikke, are you kidding or not?

Sikke: There are no worms, I was just teasing you.

The dessert

Jonsu: An apple-oat-cinnamon roast.

Jari: It’s wonderful.

Jonsu: And since the theme of the evening is love and I’ve received a huge amount of these packets…

Jari: Your new album?

Jonsu: No, I’ll give heart shaped Indica candies.

Jone: Thanks. We have to test these.

The pool game

Jone: A nine-ball tournament?

Jari: It’s not possible.

*Sikke hits*

Sikke: It didn’t go exactly as planned.

Jone: Not exactly.

*Jari hits*

Sikke: You guys hit very hard.

Jonsu: Yes they do. I never hit that hard.

Jari: I’m so macho.

Jone: You have to hit hard in order to give a spin to the ball.

*Sikke hits*

Jonsu: Sikke is excellent.

Sikke: I played very well.

*Jone hits*

Sikke: Take it easy, Jone. No masculine shooting.

some important remarks concerning this video from the former forum

Wizzu
Posted 25 September 2010 - 15:41


zthalis, on 23 September 2010 - 23:49, said:
the house where is Jonsu cooking and they play billiards and so on... (when I grow up I want to have billiard table in my kitchen too :-D )That's Jonsu's house?


The program doesn't say at all what house it is. It might be Jonsu's, or it might just as well be that she's "borrowing" someone's house for this -- after all it's nice to have a nice environment for this kind of dinner.

As for the other comments, yes it seems to be the same program format (sorry). I haven't watched the other episodes but it seems that this one was done pretty much tongue-in-cheek, at least by the guests. The comments by Finnish fans about the episode were quite positive, as in that it was enjoyable.

The other guests were Jone Nikula who is a well known media person, he was a record company rep (maybe still is?) and was one of the Idols judges in Finland, and then Jari Sillanpдд who is a singer of tango etc. (non-rock/pop) who has sold probably like 10 times more records than Indica in Finland, during the past 15 years. The only one who isn't well known in media AFAIK is the other woman who was a professional cook or something like that.

I can't say I have any real knowledge about what kind audiences the program attracts, but based on these guests I would think it's aimed to more mature viewers than teens. Also, to me it seems cooking shows are pretty popular right now on Finnish TV, so from that point of view it might not be so surprising that Jonsu ends up in one.

Niko
Posted 25 September 2010 - 19:33


Wizzu, on 25 September 2010 - 16:41, said:
The program doesn't say at all what house it is. It might be Jonsu's, or it might just as well be that she's "borrowing" someone's house for this -- after all it's nice to have a nice environment for this kind of dinner.



Although it's not said directly whether it's Jonsu's house or not, some comments indicate that it is:

1) When Jonsu starts cooking, there is a dirty oven plate and a dirty saucepot in the kitchen and Jonsu takes the blame.

2) When the guests arrive, Jone comments the house by saying that "Apparently you've got a lot of royalties". (This comment has been cut out in the Youtube video.)

Unless those comments are jokes, it has to be Jonsu's house. But I don't know for sure.


An Interview with Jonsu and Jenny in The TV Programme Buusteri (Autumn 2004)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3-HStTiYWw&

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtEs5rtND_4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdkwT1-ZkA0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ss3GoeSXLk&


translation by Niko.

I translated only the discussion with the Indica girls, so there are some gaps in the translation.

[Part 1]

Isa: Today we talk about friendship and what happens to the relationships if you have to change the school.
- - -
Miska: How about you, Jonsu? You were in a music class in Tapiola high school. Did you know many of the students beforehand because you’re from Espoo?

Jonsu:Surprisingly few, actually. When we moved from elementary school to middle school, almost the whole class remained the same, but only about three of those people went to the same high school with me. But even Espoo is such a small place that I had met most of them in some parties or other events.

Miska: It’s probably easy for you to meet new people. Do you have that kind of a character?

Jonsu: It’s quite easy for me, but if we’re talking about good friends that remain and who I call my best friends, I have about ten of those. In my opinion, if you’ve known someone over five years, then you know that he/she will remain your friend for a long time.

Miska: Have you met your good friends in school or somewhere else?

Jonsu: Well, I met my oldest friend when I was zero years old…

*laughter*

Jonsu: We are still persistently in contact. But I’ve met most of my best friends in elementary school.
- - -
Miska: When you change school and schoolmates, do you feel that you change too, Jonsu?

Jonsu: Yeah, it happened especially in middle school. I had two separate friend circles there. I was a good student in elementary school, but in the end of the sixth grade, when my teacher told me that I’m going to get a stipend, I told that I’m not going to accept it. I said that I want only 5’s (on the scale of 4-10; four being the lowest) and I wanted to be a toughie. So, I had some toughie-friends and some longtime and perhaps more genuine friends. But, as usual, in high school people started to behave more like humans.

- - -
Miska: Thank you for the discussion and keep in touch with your friends. Unfortunately I don’t have any friends who I would have known since I was zero years old.

[Part 2]

Isa: Very

Jenny: good

Jonsu: Wednesday.

Miska: Today

Jonsu: in Buusteri

Jenny: a book corner

Isa: and

Jenny: Indica

Jonsu: in a quiz

Miska: and

Minna: a fashion expo!

Jonsu: I had my first proper kiss, if quick smacks aren’t counted, when I was about 13 and it was New Year and we kissed on a wet asphalt. We were quite dramatic already then. In the morning I went home to sleep and after waking up, I realized that there was a phone number written on my forehead by a red lip liner pencil.

Isa: Now Panu and Tiina will chat with the girls. Please begin.

Tiina: Where does the name Indica come from? Does it have a story?

Jenny: Actually it’s our twist from the shade of blue called indigo which means dark blue. And we just changed it to Indica. The -a suffix makes it sound feminine.

Jonsu: And a shade of blue because we play melancholic music instead of dance-pop.

Tiina: How did all this start?

Jonsu: I founded my first band with Heini. We’ve known each other since we were little and we founded our first band in middle school. And we met two Indica members in band school. We went there in two different bands, but two members from our band went abroad as exchange students.

Jenny: So we found each other and now we have trained over three years together.

Panu: What kind of musical background do you have? Classical? Pop?

Jonsu: Everyone probably… well, every one of us has a classical background. I started to play violin when I was four years old and when we were angry teenage girls we decided to switch to a rockier direction. But some aspects of our classical background have remained in our music. We have violins, strings and pianos.

The quiz:

Miska: Now we’ll have a quiz, the first quiz of this autumn. On spring the winner was Jussu from Suurl?hettil??t who got 18 points and was the only one who managed to answer to all 20 questions in one and half minutes. I’ll ask Jonsu and Isa will ask Jenny. Timing begins now.

Miska: How many words there are before Suomi (Finland) in the lyrics of the national anthem?

Jonsu: If oi (oh) is counted as a word, Suomi is the third word.

Miska: Correct!

Isa: Is habanero a folk dance or chili pepper?

Jenny: Chili pepper.

Isa: Correct.

Miska: What kin is Gladstone Gander to Donald Duck?

Jonsu: Is he his cousin?

Miska: Correct!

Isa: What are the three colours of the Hungarian flag?

Jenny: Could they be white, blue and red?

Isa: There’s green instead of blue. So the colours are red, white and green.

Miska: Where were the Olympic Games held in the year 2000?

Jonsu: This one is such a personal question that I refuse to answer.

*laughter*

Miska: They were held in Sydney, Australia.

Isa: Is there a minimum size for pike in fishing?

Jenny: Definitely.

Isa: No there isn’t.

Miska: What was the middle name of Elvis Presley?

Jonsu: Could you answer for me, Jenny?

Miska: It was Aron.

Isa: Is Stephen Hawking a famous physicist or WRC driver?

Jenny: A physicist.

Isa: Correct.

Miska: Whose summer residence is Kes?ranta?

Jonsu: Probably some politician’s.

Miska: Yes, but please specify.

Jonsu: The prime minister’s?

Miska: Correct.

Isa: What’s the name of Hugo H?kkinen’s mother?
Jenny: Erja H?kkinen.

Isa: Correct.

Miska: Salt Lake City is the capital of which state in the United States?

Jonsu: Err…

Isa: Time!

Jonsu: Texas?

Miska: Do you want to change your answer? You can still quickly change it. It’s not Texas.

Jonsu: Well, I don’t know.

Miska: It’s Utah.

Jenny: I would have known that.

Miska: You managed to answer to 11 questions and had… one, two, three, four, five… six correct answers. You’re in the lead.

Jonsu: Wow, that’s great. I’m a bit ashamed of the Elvis thing though.

Isa: Well, now you learned that it was Aron.

Isa: Very

Jenny: good

Jonsu: Wednesday.

Miska: Today

Jonsu: in an ex… in Buusteri

Jenny: a book corner

Isa: and

Jenny: Indica

Jonsu: in a quiz

Miska: and

Minna: a fashion expo!

*laughter*

Isa: Let’s use this one.

[Part 3]

Jenny: My favourite subject in school was probably music, but I liked languages too.

Jonsu: My favourite subject in school was music, and I liked artistic gymnastics too when we went into the pit to play hide-and-seek. It was fun, except that I got a lot of that dust into my lungs and I was about to choke, but it was a lot of fun anyway.

The Kalkulaattori (calculator) competition:
- - -
Miska: Then Jonsu. What do you feel about math?

Jonsu: I’m a bit tense, but I suppose this is fun. I’m not here voluntarily, but I’m here anyway.

Miska: Who forced you here?

Jonsu: We have an awful guitarist called Jenny.

Miska: Are you henpecked in the band?

Jonsu: Apparently I am. I just realized it. We have to keep a little conference about this later.

Miska: But if you get good points here, the whole band will be proud of you. Good luck.

- - -

Miska: The competitors have ten minutes to calculate three mathematical tasks. They get ten points for each perfect answer and they have a chance to earn ten bonus points for good team work. Therefore the maximum amount of points is 40. The schools compete for the Kalkulaattori championship. There are different tasks for different levels, so it’s even chances that the winner comes from an elementary, middle or high school. Buusteri’s guests will compete against each other in a separate series.

- - -
Isa: Then Jonsu. We heard a rumour that your dad is a professor of mathematics and physics. Our censor gave you ten bonus points for that. You got 30 points in total. Are you satisfied with the result?

Jonsu: Yeah, but I’m rather an artistic than mathematical person. As you can see, I did some visual arts too. *shows the drawings on the exam paper*

Isa: And you are clearly a cat person.

Jonsu: Yeah.

Isa: So am I.

Jonsu: The result is OK.

Isa: This is a good way to start the Kalkulaattori competition.

Jonsu: I went into the lead, didn’t I?

Isa: Yes you did. Well done, Indica!

- - -

Isa: Does school take all the time of students, or do they have enough time for hobbies and other free time activity? That’s our subject today.

- - -

Miska: How about you, Jenny? Did your hobbies take more time than studying?

Jenny: Well, there was a lot of activity in our school, so it kept me busy. It was difficult to have enough time for band rehearsals, school classes and music institute lessons, but I managed it well. I didn’t get a huge burn-out.

Miska: So the school was flexible?

Jenny: Yes it was.
- - -

[Part 4]
- - -
Miska: It’s probably important to be able to plan the studying, for example, to be able to read for an exam beforehand. Or do you leave it for the last possible moment?

Jenny: At least I always do everything at the last possible moment. I can’t plan it beforehand. I trust that I manage to learn something on the last evening.

- - -

Miska: Next we’ll have the band interview.

Isa: Indica’s debut album Ikuinen virta was released on August 16, 2004 and now it’s on Finland’s album chart. Congratulations for that, girls.

Jonsu: Thank you.

Isa: You founded the band three years ago and now you’ve published the debut album. Does this album sound like what you expected it to sound three years ago?

Jenny: Yes, it does sound like us.

Jonsu: Of course the sound of the band has improved a lot during those three years and we’ve also got more ideas, but the original vision has remained pretty much intact.

Isa: Great. Jonsu, you’re the composer and lyricist of the band. You’ve mentioned fairy tales and movie music as your sources of inspiration. Is some particular fairy tale near your heart?

Jonsu: The best fairy tales I’ve read are The Little Mermaid and The Little Match Girl. And I have to recommend everyone The Brothers Lionheart, and for adults The Little Prince. And from movies, in my opinion, The Wizard of Oz is excellent and all David Lynch’s movies and Angelo Badalamenti’s movie soundtracks are great.

Isa: Have you used all these fairy tales and movies on the lyrics of this album?

Jonsu: No I haven’t. Actually, the only characters that are mentioned directly in the lyrics are Scarlett and Rhett. It’s more like that I’ve got inspiration from the magical feeling of the fairy tales.

Isa: Was the Finnish language a clear choice for you or did you consider writing English lyrics?

Jonsu: It wasn’t a clear choice. In the beginning, we made songs in English and Finnish, but when we started to make the album the record label guys told us that it would be nice if we chose which language we are going to use. Then we pondered it for a couple of weeks and decided to at least start in Finnish. In my opinion, you can say many things more beautifully in Finnish than in English, and it’s my mother tongue, so it felt the right choice at the moment.

Isa: Is it true that you composed your first symphony when you were six years old?

Jonsu: Well, it was a “symphony”. When I was six, I always wrote a fancy title for my compositions, such as symphony or sonata, but the compositions were about three bars long.

Isa: But at least you’ve set the bar high from the beginning. One more question. Your singing sound has often been compared to Maija Vilkkumaa and I have to say that when I was listening to this album, it reminded me of Maija. Have you listened to Maija’s music a lot?

Jonsu: Not really. Of course I’ve heard some of her songs and think that she’s a great musician, but it was a surprise to our band that we have been compared to her because she’s not our idol and I don’t have her albums. But it’s not a bad comparison.

Isa: Great. Thank you very much, Indica girls.


A Four-Star Dinner


Translation by Niko

I decided to translate Sikke's episode
http://arkisto.ruutu.fi/video?vt=video_ ... vid=396814 DEAD LINK?
of Nelj?n t?hden illallinen (“A four-star dinner”) in which Jonsu was a guest. Jonsu was a guest in two other episodes too, but those episodes weren’t, in my opinion, particularly interesting or funny, so I’m not going to translate them, but if someone wants to watch them anyway, here's Jari's episode http://arkisto.ruutu.fi/video?vt=video_ ... vid=396806 DEAD LINK? and here's Jone's episode http://arkisto.ruutu.fi/video?vt=video_ ... vid=396818 DEAD LINK? I skipped the first half of Sikke's episode in which the guests are guessing what Sikke will cook and then Sikke makes the food. So the translated part begins at 09:45 on the video. The commentator’s voice is in italics.

Jonsu: I like to write, but beginning it is always difficult for me. I think I was never able to finish an essay in high school, but in the matriculation exam*) I thought: “Okay, now I have six hours for this and I'm going to use that time as efficiently as I can and I’m going to enjoy this”. It was the only time I got laudatur**) for an essay. Well, it was probably the only essay I was able to write in high school. It’s nice to sit down and start to write, but part of me always resists first and says “no, no, no”.

Jone: For me the deadline is an extremely good stimulus.

Jonsu: It's the best indeed.

(Sikke welcomes the guests and offers Negroni cocktail as an aperitif. Jone praises the drink.)

Jonsu: This is surprisingly strong. I think I’ll straggle when I walk in.

Sikke: I’ve used herbs in all these dishes. Your mission is to guess which herb is in which dish while you taste or eat the food.

Jonsu: It was a funny task because it stressed my little brain cells amazingly much and I realized that I don’t know herbs very well.

(They talk about bread and Sikke serves red wine.)

Jonsu: I’m so confused about this (herb identification).

Sikke: Don’t worry. You have whole evening to think about them.

Have you identified the herbs, Jari?

Jari: I wrote here: parsley, basil... it's some weird basil, probably sweet basil...

Jonsu: I sneaked a look at Jari’s answers, but I think he’s wrong. I think the first one is coriander, not parsley. If I fail to identify this, it would be a shame because coriander is my favourite herb.

Jonsu’s answers paper:

1. Coriander
2. Dark basil
3. (a picture of a cat)
4. Mint
5. Lemon balm
1. Zucchini -> no it isn’t

(Sikke serves the starter. They talk about olive oil. Sikke says it can be used in hair too in order to make it shine. Jonsu suggests that they should oil Jone’s whole body. Jone says that oiling Jesus-looking guys is no longer in fashion.)

Jonsu: Filled bell peppers aren’t my favourite food, but these bell peppers are among the top-5 bell peppers I’ve ever eaten.

That’s a big compliment.

Jonsu: Yes it is. I’ve eaten many, many, many bell peppers in my life.

Jone: I don’t have a clue (about the herbs). If I happened to win this, I probably shouldn’t buy a lottery ticket this week because it would mean that I would have spent all my lucky guesses already.

(Sikke serves the main dish. They eat and praise the food.)

Jonsu: In the beginning I was a bit worried because there wasn’t cheese on table. I prefer to have at least as much cheese in my pasta as there is the actual pasta.


What?

(Sikke offers cheese.)


Jonsu: I tried to be civilized and put just a little amount of cheese, but it tasted good.


(Sikke has made tomato sauce “for the vegetarian”, but teases Jonsu with a piece of meat)

Sikke: Don’t you even want to taste this beef?

Jonsu: I prefer your tomato sauce.

Sikke: Take some beef, take this good beef.

Jonsu: No, no, no!

Jari: Taste some beef. It’s a little baby cow.


(Sikke praises Jone who has eaten a lot. They talk this and that and laugh. Then Sikke serves the dessert.)

Jonsu: These fruit skewers are visually the best thing I’ve seen during our week in this programme.

Jari: Nonsense.

Jonsu: Oh, I mean that you, Jari, are visually the best thing I’ve seen in this program.

Jari: Thank you.

(They continue to talk about the dessert.)

Jonsu: If there had been as big a bowl of white chocolate rum sauce as there was pasta, I would have probably taken four times more of it. But maybe that was the right amount because now I don’t feel queasy.

Sikke: What do you think is this first herb?

Jonsu: Coriander!

Jari: Parsley. It’s leaf parsley.

Jone: Coriander.

Sikke: It is parsley.

Jonsu: It can’t be!

Sikke: How can you confuse coriander to parsley?

Jari: You can’t.

Jonsu: I don’t understand how I confused parsley to coriander, which is my favourite herb.

Jone: My answer is oregano.

Jari: Does your pizza smell like that?

Jone: Well, I never order pizza with oregano.

Sikke: What was your answer to the last one, Jonsu?

Jonsu: Lemon balm.

Sikke: It’s sage.

Jari: It is? Wonderful, I was right!

Sikke: How many correct answers did you have, Jonsu?

Jonsu: Two.

Jari: I had three.

Jonsu: I thought you had four.

Jone: I had none.

Sikke: None? Okay, I announce that Jari is the winner of this herb identification competition because he identified more herbs than the others and also dared to taste them all. Congratulations Jari, the king of herbs. As a reward, you can keep all these herbs.

Jari: Wonderful!

Jonsu: (sarcastically) Oh, what a wonderful reward.

*laughter*

(Then they give points for food.)

Jonsu: Some of the dishes were excellent and some just OK. The excellent ones would have been worth six points, but those OK’s were maybe worth four points, so I give five points for food.

(Then they give points for atmosphere.)

Jonsu: My five means “very good”, so I give five points also for atmosphere.

*) Matriculation exam is the Finnish equivalent for the GED test in the US and A-levels in the UK.
**) Laudatur is the maximum grade in the matriculation exam.
Oh, I didn't know that the video is geoblocked. Nelj?n t?hden illallinen is based on an international format, so maybe the copyright owners of the format don't allow publishing the Finnish show online outside Finland. Or maybe the Finnish television channel didn’t want to pay extra for that.

Anyway, there are actually a couple of funny things in Jari's and Jone's episodes too, so I'll post them here.

(In Jari’s episode)


Jari: I googled you, Jonsu, because I didn’t know whether… I had an impression that you’re probably a vegan or vegetarian because I think that modern youth… all modern pop singers are… *laughs*

Jonsu: Rabbit food eaters?

Jari: …vegetarians.

Jonsu: I don’t usually eat meat, but I could taste a bit of it.

(In Jone’s episode, Jonsu refused to eat beef stroganoff)

Jonsu: The beef stroganoff reminded me of the days in my childhood when my mom wasn’t home and dad had to make food. He used to buy candies for an encouragement and we weren’t allowed to touch the candies before eating a plateful of stroganoff. And it tasted awful. I don’t know if Jone’s stroganoff had been any better, but my traumas are so deep that I decided not to take the risk.

A Joke Interview With Jonsu in The TV Programme Radio Millennium (October 2009)

http://areena.yle.fi/tv/1291589

transaltion -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AU838wKS ... ults_video

TALLINNA

Translation by Niko

Translation of the first episode of Tallinna. I translated only the Indica-related parts. E means the male narrator Eppu Salminen and S means the female narrator Sanna Saarij?rvi.

S: Jonsu, the sweet fairy from Indica and from the competing channel’s Kuorosota, and her bandmate Laura are going to a riding trip to the Muhu island in Saare County. And since you have to smell good while riding, let’s go to the Tax Free shop and see if we can find “Odour Horse” for the ladies.

Jonsu: I’ve found many good perfumes during make-up sessions. For example, once the make-up artist smelled just like My Little Pony, the perfumed doll I had as a child. And I asked: “What is this scent? Have you touched ponies recently?” But she hadn’t. She had certain Chlo? perfume.

Laura: Maybe we should next go to smell that, although I don’t want to smell My Little Pony.

Jonsu: I would want to.

Laura: I’m excited to know what kind of a trip you’ve planned for us. I don’t know at all what’s going to happen during our trip.

Jonsu: This will be a wonderful trip. The producer just said: “Jonsu, what would you like to do? Plan a dream day for yourself.” I asked: “A weekend trip? Okay. I want to go riding to the Muhu island.” I planned to visit Sikke Sumari there. We were in Neljдn tдhden illallinen together and she then told about her house and said that the island is a wonderful place. And I was supposed to visit there in summer, but somehow the summer went too fast. And now I would have time, but Sikke isn’t there at the moment. So let’s visit a nearby horse farm.

- - -

Laura: I wonder which one is our car.

Jonsu: I think it’s that one.

S: Indica’s Jonsu and Laura have arrived at Tallinn and now they should find a way to Muhu. E: It’s easy. It goes through your mouth. (In Finnish “muhun” means “to me”) S: Very funny.

Laura: You want to be the navigator?

Jonsu: I think our chances to survive are better if you drive, but we will probably get lost if I read the map.

Laura: Argh

Jonsu: What’s happening?

Laura: I don’t know how to get in.

E: Laura, it’s the rear door. Try the front door.

Laura: Oh, it works like this. Very nice.

Laura: Apparently this car is made for a giant.

Jonsu: It would require the length of our legs combined.

Laura: Why the hell is it beeping?

Laura: Let’s see. Now it’s running.

Jonsu: Can you drive with automatic gear?

Laura: Yes I can.

Jonsu: Yeah, right.

Laura: Well, I’ve never used this kind of a gear system. Which one controls the gear? I see which gear is on, but…

Jonsu: Maybe we should try together.

E: So the gear was found.

Laura: Aha. It goes like this.

Jonsu: It says “drive”.

Laura: I don’t even have the handbrake on.

Jonsu: I’ve driven a car the handbrake on many times, even long distances.

Laura: Maybe it’s because all your cars have been old.

S: This will be an exciting trip.

- - -

S: Jonsu and Laura have held the road. E: Jonsu reads the map, sort of.

Jonsu: Let’s follow that car.

Jonsu: I’m actually a good driver nowadays. Have you, Laura, been my passenger recently?

Laura: No, because usually if we’re in the same car, you’re talking to your cell phone and I’m driving your car.

Jonsu: Yeah, sometimes it goes like that.

Laura: Well, you’re now quite a good driver. There were a couple of police episodes in the past, but you’ve become a good driver.

Jonsu: I was picking up Laura, but the police stopped me because someone had reported them a suspected drunken driver. I definitely wasn’t drunk at all. I think police has stopped me two times. But nowadays I try to focus well when I’m driving.

Laura: Now I’m even proud of your driving skills, but you should practise reading the map. But I suppose you’re just not interested about the map.

Jonsu: That’s true. But in the other police episode I drove badly on purpose because I saw some dark car following me for a long time and thought that there are some dangerous gangsters on that car and wanted to show them that I’m tougher than them. I was speeding and changed the lanes quickly. I didn’t risk anyone’s life, but I just wanted to show them that I’m a toughie and dangerous. Then suddenly the car turned the siren on and stopped me. And I was like “I can’t believe this”. I tried to explain the policemen that I was just trying to intimidate them. And fortunately, just when they were writing a fine for me, one of the policemen got a call and was told that “it’s not that car”. So they were looking for a thief or something and didn’t give me the fine.

Laura: But weren’t you stopped once at the centre too?

Jonsu: Yes, but that was the suspected drunken driver thing.

Laura: But that’s not the same occasion. The police have twice suspected you being a drunken driver.

S: Now we have to leave Jonsu and Laura before police stops them.

- - -

S: Welcome back from the break. E: Thank you.

Laura: Did you pack your swimsuit? If the weather stays like this, you could ride a horse in a swimsuit.

Jonsu: I actually have my bikinis with me. On many concert trips I’ve made a mistake by leaving them home, and then there has been a wonderful swimming pool. So now I don’t have to swim naked like the last time.

E: What? Naked? Where were we then?

Jonsu: Was it with you or Heini? I think I did it with you.

Laura: I’ve never swum naked with you.

Jonsu: You even had a camera.

Laura: That’s not true.

Jonsu: Stop putting me on! I have swum naked with you in front of the camera. But this time I have bikinis with me.

Laura: I meant that are you ready to ride on bikinis if the weather stays like this?

Jonsu: No I’m not. But the peak of a riding helmet is almost like an umbrella, a little umbrella.

Laura: So you think it would cover your whole body. Jonsu, you’re little, but not that little.

Jonsu: I’ll pick a big helmet.

E: That sounds good: Jonsu riding a horse naked with a big helmet.

Laura: There are no signposts.

Jonsu: Hey, there was a man. There are benches by the road and there was a man sitting on one.

S: They found a man.

Laura: I can’t stop the car from 100 km/h if you see a bench.

Jonsu: What can we do then? We will drive by all the houses if you can’t stop the car. I’ll try to look at the horizon so I could notify you in time.

Laura: Do you seriously want to ask for help from some house?

Jonsu: Yes. Let’s just park the car in front of the door and knock the door from the car and say “hi”.

Laura: Oh lord!

Laura: You should have bought a map in the gas station.

Jonsu: Let’s see what we have here. Hey! *Finds two maps*. “Northern Europe” and “Estonia”.

E: In my opinion it would have been a better idea to find a house than a map. Just knock the door and ask: “Where are we and where should we go?”

Jonsu: Look! We are somewhere near Haapsalu. This is quite a large-scale map. Let’s see if I can find a smaller-scale map.

- - -

S: There’s something going on with Jonsu and Laura. E: They’re following my advice. The ladies intend to stop and ask for help.

Jonsu: They were very friendly. There was a man and a child. I knew they would be nice because they have that colourful spinning top on the fence. People who have such a top will definitely be willing to help you. He said that we haven’t driven too far. So let’s continue forward. We didn’t speak the same language, but we just communicated.

Laura: So are we going to Haapsalu?

Jonsu: Yes. We are here. And we should go from Haapsalu to Virtsu through Lihula.

Laura: Through Lihula.

Jonsu: So we still have to drive quite some time.

Jonsu: Virtsu is 75 kilometres away and our ferry leaves in 15 minutes.

Laura: Look how they drive here! Seriously!

Jonsu: We have to hurry up. Let me think. 75 kilometres in 15 minutes, so you have to… if I calculated correctly… you have to drive 300 km/h.

Laura: Okay. It’s not that I wouldn’t dare to, but…

Jonsu: Oh, I see. The speed meter ends at 220 km/h, so this car probably can’t go faster than that.

- - -

E: Let’s see if Jonsu is wearing bikinis already. S: No she isn’t, but they’ve arrived at the port. And they’re late from the Muhu ferry. Fortunately the ferry will come back soon.

Laura: High five.

Jonsu: We were supposed to drive like this *points the route*, but we drove like this *points again*. But finally we made it anyway.


E: Hey! Is this the theme song of Titanic? S: Yes it is. My Heart Will Go On.

Jonsu: I feel how strong the forces of nature are and how small a human being is.

Laura: So you’re in that mood again.

Jonsu: Let’s play Titanic. How does it go? *Hums the theme song*. Laura, come to play Titanic with me!

E: A wonderful woman. Wind caressing her hair, wind caressing her face, wind lifting nicely the tail of her coat…
S: Shut up! Hey, there are the lights of the Muhu island on the other side. And there’s Tihunen’s horse farm out there. We will go there, but only on the next episode.

++
translation of the second episode of Tallinna:

E: In the previous episode we left Jonsu and Laura from Indica to the ferry that was on its way to Muhu. S Now they’ve arrived at the Muhu island and they should find their way to the horse farm, but finding things isn’t Jonsu’s and Laura’s strongest ability. And they are asking for help, of course, from a wino.

Jonsu: So, Laura, now we are on the Muhu island and I’ve no idea about the address, but I know the description. An old man with long beard, pony-size horses, withers between 135 and 150 cm and the name is Tihunen.

Laura: Tihunen?

Jonsu: Tihunen is the name of that man.

Laura: Isn’t it the name of the farm? It seems that we have to sleep in the car this night.

Jonsu: That may be the case. Hey, stop! Ask for him.

Laura: Maybe you should ask.

Jonsu: Okay, I’ll ask.

Laura: Okay, I’ll drive here.

Jonsu: Do I dare to ask?

Laura: He’s drunk. But ask him anyway.

Jonsu: (In Finnish): Excuse me, Tihunen farm. (In English): Excuse me, Tihuset.

E: This is Baltic hospitality. Maybe you should just continue driving.

Jonsu: Maybe we will. (In English to the man): Sorry.

Jonsu: (whispering) That was spooky.

Jonsu: It’s too early to say that I see light, but there seems to be some kind of an inn.

Laura: What if it’s closed and the old man is sleeping?

Jonsu: Maybe the old man has butchered the horses and went to rest...

Laura: …and has put German sausage to the table.

Martin: Good evening.

Jonsu: Good evening. We got a bit lost. We had a small adventure.

Martin: Where did you get lost?

S: If they knew where they got lost, they wouldn’t have got lost.

Jonsu: Grasshoppers are singing. This seems to be a wonderful place, although it’s hard to tell because it’s dark outside.

- - -

S: Let’s get back to Jonsu and Laura on Muhu. Muhu is an idyllic place. Foggy fields, morning dew, beautiful horses running on the grass…

E: And beautiful women.

S: Indeed.

Jonsu: Laura, did you wake up when these horses galloped? There were probably about hundred horses running.

Laura: Maybe there were all 300 horses of this farm running.

Jonsu: I woke up to the loud stump of the hooves. I opened the curtains and saw them galloping through the field as if they were a pack of wild horses.

Laura: This is a bit different place where we were yesterday.

S: Jonsu and Laura go to eat breakfast and find Martin Kivisoo having a lecture about a tree - which is in the middle of the room.

Martin: The culture of forest folks has been very similar through Spain to Siberia. The world tree of ancient Germans was ash. In that old culture the most important thing was cognition. On three directions there are earth folks and on east are the cosmic folk. We call him Ukku, the god of lightning, and you (the Finns) call him Ukko, the high god. The fire represents him. It’s a sign of co-operation and friendship if a human being comes to seek power and connection from nature. This is the mark of human.

E: Let’s leave the girls to hug the tree for a while.

- - -

Jonsu: Look, there’s a wonderful little foal too.

E: Welcome back. S Indica’s Jonsu and Laura have a taste of horsepower in the horse farm on Muhu.

Jonsu: You look very kind. This one definitely doesn’t eat anyone. Wouldn’t it be nice to take this with us to the ship? Would you come with us?

E: “No I wouldn’t. Or maybe I will if you let me smell your neckline.”

Jonsu: Let’s take the chaps. Laura, I recommend that you use them too because sometimes I’ve ridden without them and got huge bruises from the stirrup leather. Gloves are useful in longer trips. Last time I lost skin from my finger because the horse was pulling with its head. What else do we need? We have the gloves, the helmets and the chaps. And it’s good to have shoes that have a small heel. That way your feet don’t slip away from the stirrup and you don’t get stuck from your foot.

Martin: Perhaps a more fervent horse would do justice to your skills…

Jonsu: A more fiery horse?

Martin: …but let’s start with this “fully automatic” horse so I can see your level of skills. After that I can give you a more fervent horse.

Jonsu: Okay. Let’s see if I can sit on an automatic horse. Can I jump now?

Martin: Yes.

Jonsu: Is the saddle attached firmly? I suppose it is.

Katrin: Do you remember your horse name?

Laura: No.

Katrin: Valsi.

Laura: Valsi. Thank you.

S: Jonsu hugs the horse in order to get acceptance. We’ll get going soon, as long as Martin gets a cart for himself. The assistant Katrin goes along.

- - -

S: On Muhu, Martin, Jonsu and Laura who has turned out to be allergic to horses are arriving at the crossing of seven roads, which is the first place to stop. Once again, Martin has a pathological need to lecture. This time he’s talking about forest spirits. Ho-hum.

Laura: Jonsu forced me here even though she knows that I’m allergic to horses.

Jonsu: But this is the sweetest place in the world. I could move here.

Martin: Dear girls, we have arrived at the crossing of seven roads. This is a place where it’s pleasant to be and also the forest folk loved places like this.

E: Jonsu is a lovely forest bunny and Laura is luckily allergic to animals.

Martin: We are visiting Tapio, the god of forest. In order to refresh and get good power from the forest, we have to give a gift to Tapio. Let’s offer seeds of life for Tapio. This is enough.

E: Next on TV5: a nature documentary. On the route of earth religion on Muhu you will get a close touch to old beliefs. The culture of ancient forest people and earth religion are very important for Estonians and Estonia is one of few countries where they have remained. Earlier, people had an ability to identify to nature and, when necessary, seek peace and energy from it. Humans used to ask for an advice or help from nature. In the magical crossing of seven roads you can knock a stone and present one personal wish to the stone spirit. Whether the wish will come true, it depends on how well you empathize to the ritual.

Martin: Dear friends, our adventure will continue.

- - -

E: On Muhu, worshipping the spirits of earth has gone out of control.

Martin: In this place you can give a gift to the spirits of earth. The gift is placed on east side, and you can also make the human mark. It’s done by moving your hand from up to down, from right to left and then a circle around it. This way we can greet the spirits of earth and give them a gift.

S: Now they are sliding on a stone. This is the weirdest riding trip I’ve ever seen.

Jonsu: Apparently my bottom isn’t very slick.

S: Let’s leave the girls to the forest for a while.

3rd part

translation of the third episode:


S: In previous episodes Indica’s Jonsu and Laura found their way to the Muhu island after some twists. The girls enjoy being in the Tihunen horse farm whose leader/guide, the big personality Martin Kivisoo has taken Jonsu and Laura to the riding trip and introduced them to ancient religions. Laura is not only allergic to horses, but also a total gallop virgin.

Martin: Dear friends, today we will have an extraordinary day. Today, one human being has galloped for the first time. We have to sing to her and congratulate her. Give me your hand.

*Sings and dances with Laura*.

Congratulations!

Laura: Thank you. It was easy to dance because I had a good leader.

Jonsu: Yeah. Unfortunately he didn’t congratulate me for anything.

S: Laura and Jonsu have been riding whole morning, so it’s time to eat.

E: Martin as a gentleman has reserved a beautiful place for beautiful women.

Laura: This is an incredibly beautiful place. And we’ve been lucky to spend the whole day in sunshine instead of rain.

Jonsu: Indeed. Maybe we should come back some day with the other girls, maybe in our anniversary, which will be after one month.

Jonsu: We’ve had one gig in Estonia. Was it at the Viru hotel?

Laura: Yes, at the Viru hotel.

Jonsu: So the gig wasn’t far from Finland. The Viru hotel is almost like a part of Finland.

Laura: Yeah, I think the audience was mainly Finnish there.

Jonsu: Yeah. It would be wonderful to have gigs somewhere else in Estonia, perhaps here on the Muhu island.

Laura: Perhaps on Muhu indeed.

Jonsu: The Viru gig was fun, but it was quite a typical club gig. It didn’t differ much from the gigs in Finland.

Laura: I don’t think that it differed in any way.

Jonsu: Actually, one thing was different. Unfortunately someone rolled down the stairs. Although… Well, I don’t know that person’s nationality.

Laura: But you have a suspicion?

Jonsu: Yes I have, but I’m not going to say it aloud.

E: Wasn’t Indica’s first hit Ikuinen virta? S: Yes it was. What do you mean? E: I’ve been in the Viru hotel and can confirm that there’s an eternal stream of booze. (In Finnish “ikuinen virta” means “eternal stream”).

S: Apparently you have an eternal stream of bad jokes.

- - -

E: Dear watchers, now I can promise that the mood is different than it was before the break. We’ll visit the Muhu island listening to Indica’s music. Enjoy!

- - -

S: It’s time to calm down in the serene company of Jonsu and Laura. E: The girls are returning to the horse farm. The riding trip took six hours, which would be a tough challenge even to more experienced buttocks.

Jonsu: Now you have a chance to eat grass at pasture. I would want to take you both with me, but I know that there is no place better than this for you in Espoo. You wouldn’t enjoy being there.

Laura: Well done. You didn’t drop me, although I was afraid that you would.

Jonsu: It feels weird to walk legs together now. It would be easier to walk like this.

Martin: Tomorrow you could place two chairs like this and sit between them.

Laura: It’s embarrassing to return from the Estonian ship walking like this.

Jonsu: “Hi! I’ve just been riding. I didn’t drink any alcohol.”

Martin: In my opinion, people who survive from such a tough day are heroes. And those, who even smile cheerfully after all this, are cheerful heroes. And I want to sing to you. And it goes:

*Sings and dances with Jonsu and Laura*.

S: The same song again. Apparently it suits to any situation. But where does he get his aphorisms from?

Jonsu: Thank you, Martin. We’ll see again a bit later.

Martin: Thank you for your cheerful mood.

E: What can you say?

S: I’ll say: *imitates the lyrics*.

E: And I say that it’s time to have a break because everyone starts to get crazy here.

Jonsu: Don’t push me.

- - -

S: Let’s visit Jonsu and Laura on Muhu again. The girls are having an evening walk in order to relax their thighs and say goodbye to the cause of the pain in their thighs: the horses.

Jonsu: That fence looks nice. It’s made of billets.

Laura: Are you sure it isn’t just a stack of billets?

Jonsu: I’m not sure, but it looks so organized and don’t have any holes, so I believe that this is a fence. Let’s try if they are attached to each other.

Laura: Well?

Jonsu: It may be just a stack of billets.

Laura: Or maybe it’s both.

Jonsu: Yeah.

Jonsu: Guess what came into my mind when we talked about occupations?

Laura: What?

Jonsu: When I was little, I dreamed of living with a pack of wild horses.

Laura: Do you mean as a member of the pack or as their caretaker?

Jonsu: Well, mainly as a member.

Laura: Like Tarzan?

Jonsu: Yeah, like Tarzan.

Jonsu: Okay. We can enter here. The Moon looks nice.

E: Jonsu has to sentimentalize with the horses alone because Laura’s allergy doesn’t allow her to go near the hay burners.

Jonsu: I believe in love. And I believe that every living creature has some kind of a spirit. I’m not superstitious in a way that I would do a ritual if a black cat crossed a road, but I believe that there are a lot more things that we can see or experience with our senses.

Jonsu: Somehow I feel that here everything is in harmony.

Jonsu: I think that humans are happy when they try to live as well as they can and respect other people and things around them. And nature is a very important thing. I don’t think that humans can live in balance if they are selfish and ignore all the other creatures.

S: During the sentimentalizing the evening changes to morning.

Jonsu: It's about seven o'clock now. I woke up after six and Laura just slept, although I tried to talk to her. So I decided to come to meet the horses. I’ll check how they have slept.

Jonsu: This is the last time I see these horses on this trip, the last greeting. Then I’ll have a quick breakfast if Laura is awake. And then it’s time to go to the ferry.

S: Phew! That was nice. For once I wanted to be quiet and just watched and listened.

4th part

translation of the fourth episode of Tallinna, which is the last one with the Indica girls:


S: Now we’ll go to the island of Muhu in Saare County, where Indica’s Jonsu woke up fresh early in the morning and went to meet the horses on the last day of the trip. The travel companion Laura is still sleeping.

Jonsu: … the pack of horses galloping. There comes Martin. The only little, very little, negative thing is that now my feet are wet up to my knees because they’ve sucked all water from the grass.

Jonsu: I’ll go to wake up Laura at some point and change my socks and shoes. And after a cup of tea everything is perfect.

E: Perfect is also Martin’s laugh. Martin is the owner of the horse farm where Jonsu and Laura are visiting.

Jonsu: It was so cool. We took the horses outside and the whole pack galloped through the field.

Laura: It looked nice indeed when I saw them yesterday morning.

Jonsu: Didn’t you wake up today to that sound?

Laura: No I didn’t.

Jonsu: Okay. It’s a bit wistful to leave. I want to come back soon.

Laura: Have you bought a map to help us find the way back to Tallinn?

Jonsu: No, I still trust to the house with the spinning top.

Laura: But it isn’t on the route we’re supposed to drive.

Jonsu: Oh, I didn’t realize that. It makes this more difficult. Well, if we don’t find a house with a colourful spinning top, children’s shoes are another good sign.

Laura: You start to sound scary.

Jonsu: Let’s try to use a different route this time. We should avoid making that extra circuit. By the way, I have to pack my stuff first. I’ll go packing soon.

Laura: Jonsu, let’s have a competition on who packs faster. I love competitions.

Jonsu: Come on.

Laura: You know how much I love winning.

Jonsu: I have awkward wet pantyhose and all kinds of things.

Laura: Yey! I won! Okay, I cheated a bit.

Jonsu: You haven’t zipped up your bag yet.

Laura: But I’ll do it soon.

Jonsu: You cannot be beaten in any competition. I wonder why I have this many black pantyhoses.

Laura: Look, I’m ready.

Jonsu: While I’m packing, could you sing something to me?

Laura: Nope.

Jonsu: I recommend “I Will Always Love You”. It would be romantic. Please. Please, Laura. I need some romance in my life.

- - -

E: Welcome back. Now we’ll visit the horse farm on the island of Muhu. Jonsu and Laura are ready to go home.

S: But first they have to say goodbye to the grandfather of all lecturers and the promoter of ancient religions and organic lifestyle, Martin.

Jonsu: Hello!

Laura: Hi!

Martin: Hi! This will be your last coffee here.

Jonsu: Yes it will.

Martin: In my opinion, every person includes a small piece of god. And I’m glad that you girls have sunnily caressed that part of you here on the island of Muhu. The Sun is the most important thing to the residents of Muhu. This eight-sided ornament in our national costume represents the Sun and is the symbol of everything that develops and grows. It had the same meaning in Mesopotamia 3000 years ago. Therefore I hope that you will always remember this when you go back to Finland.

Martin: If there’s no sad farewell, there won’t be a cheerful reunion. Therefore:

*sings and dances with the girls*.

S: I told that he likes to lecture, but he also likes to sing. Martin is a super cute teddy bear.

E: A lovely little furry toy?

S: No, he’s simply a wonderful person.

- - -

E: In Saare County, Jonsu and Laura are driving and immediately they’re not sure where they are.

S: The twists of the outward journey seem to repeat.

Laura: You’re an excellent navigator. When we come to a crossing, you ask me where we should drive.

Jonsu: Well, look at this map. For example, Muhu has four red lines and a couple of white lines, so how am I supposed to navigate with this map? I don’t even know which direction we are driving.

Laura: When you go to a map shop next time, I recommend buying a specific map of the destination area.

Jonsu: Laura, do you think I’ve ever been in a map shop?

Jonsu: It’s 13:10 and the next ferry will leave half past one. So we have to drive 8 kilometres in 20 minutes. I think you can do that.

Laura: I agree.

E: Let’s leave Jonsu and Laura speeding for a while.

- - -

E: In Saare County, the traffic experts Jonsu and Laura are, surprisingly, late from the ferry, just like on the outward journey. S: The return journey of these girls is perfect dejа vu.

Jonsu: Can it really be true that the next ferry will go at 14:40?

Laura: I don’t know, but it’s unbelievable that for once we are somewhere in time, something like this happens.

Jonsu: I didn’t realize that we should have arrived that much beforehand. We were here about ten minutes early.

Laura: But we wouldn’t have found our way here any faster anyway.

Jonsu: Yeah, but I didn’t know that you have to come to the queue so early.

Laura: Well, we will arrive home after this little twist.

Jonsu: The sign says 14:40. We won’t be at home in the evening.

E: Maybe you should sing something while you’re waiting. For example, My Heart Will Go On.

S: Let’s have a break before the next ferry will come.

- - -

E: Welcome back from the fascinating world of commercials.

S: On Muhu, the waiting is over and the girls are on their way to the continent.

S: And the trip went this fast on television. How long did it take? About 15 seconds?

E: Quicker than by helicopter. But the girls’ difficulties aren’t over. Now they should be able to guess the right way to Tallinn and go to the next ferry.

S: They will probably slightly miss it.

Jonsu: Probably.

Laura: What time is it?

Jonsu: We have to drive 170 kilometres in 2 hours and 20 minutes. It’s not entirely impossible. It depends on how much beforehand we have to be there.

Laura: You’re talking nonsense, Jonsu. I asked what time it is. Please answer my question.

Jonsu: Ten past three, isn’t it? And the ship will leave at 17:30.

Laura: Is it really ten past three?

E: Now they can't even read a clock.

Jonsu: I think it is.

Jonsu: We don’t necessarily have to go by the highway 10.

Laura: This is the highway 10. I just wondered if it’s a good or a bad thing.

Jonsu: It says 10 here on the map, so it probably means the highway 10. I’d prefer to be on the highway 9.

E: She doesn’t quite get the logic of the map.

S: I wonder if they will find their way home from Tallinn before this will be shown on television. We’ll see.

- - -

S: Good news to Indica fans: Jonsu and Laura have found the right way. Now they’re talking about their fans.

Laura: It was a coincidence that I ended up being the drummer of Indica. I had earlier played drums a little, but at that point I played electric guitar and would have preferred to be a guitarist. Unfortunately they already had a guitarist and the drums were the only instrument that no sane person had accepted to play. So they threw me behind the drums. Jonsu writes all our songs and we arrange them together. I don’t know exactly how she writes them.

Jonsu: We have different fans in different countries.

Laura: Surprise.

Jonsu: There are Germans in Germany, a bit darker people in Italy… I don’t know. I think that every band answers to this question in the same way, so we have fans from all age groups and so on.

Laura: The previous time we released new material was in the year two thousand and…
*laughs*

E: In the year 2000? You were probably about ten years old then.

Jonsu: Has someone given her laughing gas or what’s wrong with her?

Laura: It was two thousand and… what was the year?

Jonsu: Two thousand and…

Laura: Nine.

Jonsu: I suppose it was then.

Laura: And after that we released… *laughs*.

Jonsu: Come on, what’s wrong with her? Laura, have you eaten mushrooms or what’s wrong with you?

Laura: I’m just… *laughs*.

Jonsu: I know a good therapist for you. When I was young I had to go to therapy because I couldn’t stop laughing at places where you aren’t supposed to laugh, such as…

Laura: I’ve never laughed this much.

Jonsu: You’re laughing with tears. I used to laugh, for example, at funerals.

Laura: I’ve never laughed at a funeral.

Jonsu: So the therapist hypnotized me…

Laura: Yeah, you’ve told this to me before.

E: If they are having so much fun, I want to join the band.

S: *laughs*. Their laughter is very catching.
*laughs*

the links to Tallinna videos seem to be dead, probably later I'll download them at youtube

The reposting of media stuff from the former forum topic "Media" will be continued

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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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 Post subject: Re: Media
PostPosted: Mon 21. Jan 2013, 17:09 
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INTERVIEWS ON YOUTUBE IN ENGLISH (A WAY AWAY PERIOD)

Interview Indica in Paris
by Magalik1 and Wagnawok


Magalik1 wrote:

Jonsu came a bit late to answer the last questions ^^ It was on May 31st when they were in Paris

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHCkJdMsag4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOiCFwRxqeM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHoeQHU41vU&NR


Interview with Indica
by SpazioRock




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCbM_r4AE8g

Intervista alle INDICA
by Radiodeinavigli


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0xxe5erPrk

Important comments from the former forum concerning thsi interview

Taikata
Posted 25 June 2010 - 22:56


Did I hear in the second interview that they're going to release a way away later on with 3 additional songs..?
=S *doesn't want to have to buy the album twice for 3 new songs* [yea.. I could just get the digital releases if they'll do them, but I much prefer to have a CD..]
Someone correct me if I misheard!

Kold
Posted 25 June 2010 - 23:26


I heard it too, the is Outside in (Ulkona) on the CDs, don't know if its only on the deluxe version. On the LP there is Nursery Crimes, and Jonsu said there would be a be 2 bonus songs on the LP, but I can only find Nursery Crimes(Noita). The second song was called Breathe

Wishmaster
Posted 25 June 2010 - 23:43


Yes, I got Outside In with Digi-Pack (I think that just 'regular' CD doesn't have it), Nursery Crimes, as Kold said is only on LP and last one (Breathe) is probably planned for Japanese release because they usually get some extra bonus because of higher price on music albums.
(I'm just guessing for the last bonus song)

Interview mit Indica
By HitaminPur


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTAWiVsL-wc

Other interviews will be reposted later

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Interview In the Orkus Magazine 06.2010

translation by Moonchild

Virgin Soil

We’re meeting the musicians after an exhausting day in the foyer of the Hyatt-Hotel in Berlin. They went through press conferences and interviews without any break – it has become very late. Nevertheless singer Jonsu and bass-player Heini prove to be lively, bright and inseparable dialogue partners.

Orkus: While being really successful in Finland, you’re not that well known in this country. With which feelings did you enter the stage today?

Jonsu: It wasn’t that easy of course. It was a huge challenge – even more, because we Indicans have to accomplish much more on stage than in Finland where the people know us and our songs. Yet, thanks to the support-tour for Nightwish it wasn’t such a new feeling to be the “new band”.

O: Did you enjoy making a new start in foreign countries – after the breakthrough in Finland?

J: I dread the first step in foreign countries. Long ago, before the first Nightwish-Tour I suffered from nightmares and had the feeling as if I wasn’t ready for this step. In one dream I stand naked in the backstage area and had to go on stage…

H: Hey, that happened in reality!

J: Oh my god, you’re right! (both laughing) Yet, I went on the stage in my dream. Well, I just heard too many horror stories from other bands, how they were pelted with bottles and booed.

H: And yet nothing like that happened. We weren’t even pelted with tomatoes – only with money.

O: With money?

J: Yes, that happened in Denmark for real! I told the audience that we would like to see the Legoland but we weren’t given money by our parents. Suddenly coins flew to us on the stage and I was annoyed that I didn’t try this trick earlier. (grins) Still the uncertainty stayed especially since Nightwish is a little bit more metallic.

O: Nevertheless Indica fits the support-act because of their Finnish melancholy and hymnical refrains.

J: That’s what we think, and many people obviously liked our shows – compared to their reactions after the shows. Yet, with 5.000 to 10.000 fans there have to be some that like us.

O: When did you decide to give the rest of the world a proper talking to?

J: There was no particular point when we decided. We wrote A Way Away though we didn’t have a record deal in foreign country yet. Things changed with the Nightwish-tour were many people came to us and told us that we really should do something in English so that they can understand what we’re delivering. It was a matter of time and Tuomas gave us the encouragement we needed.

O: A real patron of your art as it seems. Do you have this good rapport with Mr Holopainen because of geographical reasons?

H: No, not a bit. He’s living five hours away from us.

J: Some years ago we had a gig at the Tavastia in Helsinki, were Tuomas was present. After the show he came to me and told me that he is a big Indica fan, what was mind-blowing for me at a moment. The contact never broke since that moment and someday he asked us whether we want to support the Scandinavian tour of Nightwish. What a question! (laughs)

H: It was on this same tour that we were sitting drunken together in one night and Tuomas was telling us at about 4 o’clock that we wanted to produce our next album. According to the time we were fuzzy-headed and thought it was a great idea. We never thought that he was serious.

J: The best ideas always come at 4 o’clock at night in Lappland! After this night we became close friends. We’re sharing similar opinions and thoughts about music , what was very important for the creative process in Indica – in which Tuomas is involved since some time past.

O: A Way Away therefore was indeed formed under the aegis of Tuomas?

H: Yes, Tuomas long since became the 6th member of the band. He accompanied the whole one and a half years that took the album to be formed, visited us in our rehearsal room and was in contact with us.

Soul of a child

A friendly Finnish roady brings us new, much more colourful cocktail creations. The three of them talk in Finnish for a while, that sonorous and melodic yet hopelessly complicated language, with which you can curse as passionate as in Italian and as well passionate romanticize as in French. Also the first albums of Indica were written in the mother tongue of the members.

O: Your English debut consists of new and new arranged songs. What was more difficult for you?

J: Surprisingly the new arranging. Those old songs are accompanying us for so many years, were played live so many times that we have a totally different relationship to them than to new songs. You like them the way they are, everyone likes different parts of our old songs most. And now we had the task to improve those old songs since we didn’t want to release the same or a weaker version of a well-known Indica song.

O: Jonsu, your lyrics are characterized by a very poetic and melancholic choice of words. Wasn’t it difficult to translate the old lyrics into a new language?

J: It is impossible to translate poetry into a different language. Every try is condemned to failure. Therefore I had to change the lyrics. While doing so I noticed that I still find myself in some of the songs I wrote 6-7 years ago. The scenery of my soul has stayed the same.

H: Fortunately you won’t find yourself in the melodies of your old songs, Jonsu! (giggles)

J: (indignant) She’s doing it again, you see? They are always making fun of me, because the one or other melody of my very old songs sounds of course very childish. I’m admitting it! (grins) Nevertheless you could find a certain thoughtfulness in those lyrics.

O: Do you think that is connected to your Finnish origin? The Fins are not for nothing classified as melancholycultivatives.

J: Sure, the soul of a child is affected by the surroundings where it’s been raised but I wouldn’t call myself “typical Finnish”. I see it more as a proof that you remain true to yourself in the core and that you hear the child resonating in yourself as an adult.

O: And you remained true to yourself considering that you composed your first songs in junior school age. Was it your dream, on from the start to become a musician?

J: Yes, as long as I can reminisce there was always only music for me. Six year old I composed concerts or symphonies – however only one line until I lost interest and immediately wanted to start the next composition. (laughs) At least I have more endurance nowadays.


Second part:


A life for the music

Jonsu likes to call music her “lover”. “Of course music is not my only lover”, she says with a twinkle in her eye. “But it’s by far the most faithful!” Heini and Jonsu look at each other understanding – no man would want to interpose himself between them and the music.

O: Jonsu, how did your musical career start?

J: I started playing the violin at the age of four. I was whining at my mother to by me a violin until she finally gave in. When she asked me, what I like about this instrument so much that I had to have it I said: “The name sounds so beautiful!” And doesn’t it sound good to say now, 20 years later, that even at that time I really cared about the sound of special words…?

O: Heini, were you also that young when you came in contact with music the first time?

H: I began playing the piano at the age of five and also played cello some time later. I met Jonsu in the music-school were we went when we were little children. We spend a lot of time together and became close friends. Ever since then we’re making music together.

O: Since 2001 under the name Indica. How did the band change in the almost 10 years of existing?

J: Well… (thinks) Alright, of course we were less talented with our instruments than we are now and we weren’t taking it so seriously. We were teenagers who simply played classical-music for too long and finally wanted to start playing Rock’n’Roll. And this is what we still want today.

H: Damn right! (laughs) We wanted to play on festivals and meet the bands we admired ardently. At the time we started Indica we were still fans whose biggest dream was to get to know certain musicians.

J: Oh my god, I still remember how we captured even small pieces from television when a certain band or singer gave a performance. Once I totally freaked out because my mother accidently overrode (??) one of these video tapes. I was maybe 13 and tore apart my t-shirt due to frustration. I was very dramatic at that time… (smiles)

H: (raises her eyebrows) You were?

J: Alright, I’m still dramatic…

H: Another story comes to my mind… Being a young girl, Jonsu sent the singer of a Finnish rockband – with whom she totally fell in love with – a cigarette and asked him in a love-letter to smoke the half of it and then send it back to her.

J: (laughs) I never got it back! The only problem is that Finland is a very small country and that now I even know the singer in person! My only hope is that he won’t remember…

O: Meanwhile, the situation changed and now you are the reason for love-letters and runs on concerts. How did you experience the increasing popularity?

J: It all went on in very slow steps. We’re in a similar situation now – we have to start again as an unknown band, I have to work on my English pronunciation and we have to plan our success in little steps. One always has enough time to accustom himself to the growing attention. The strange thing was that our album was never in the top 10 but nevertheless it reached platinum. The people bought our album over many months, what satisfied me much more.

O: This long-term effect also characterizes A Way Away, an album between yearning rock, gloomy pop and much Scandinavian melancholy. Of how much escapism does the fairytale-like title of the album consist?

J: We chose the title A Way Away, because all songs on the album are dealing with people who stay in alternative realities. All those keys and doors in the artwork support the issue of escaping. Therefore it can be truly understood as escapism, yes. For me music was always a world where you could sink into, draw back and where I could hold on to. Music gave me the possibility to leave everything behind and live in my own world.

H: At the same time, the album deals with discovering new worlds for oneself. It is not only about leaving something behind but to find another, more free world, in which one can unfold himself.

O: A Way Away is therefore the key to wonderland after falling through the rabbit’s burrow?

H: That’s how you could say it, yes.

J: Everything what we are doing with Indica helps us to realise this free world. While composing I’m much more myself. If this was different, the key wouldn’t fit the lock.

Television Interview With Jonsu And Heini On Yle Aamu-TV In June 3, 2010:

LINK?

Quoted from Nightwish forum

translation by Niko

The famous band Indica has just released the album A Way Away in Finland and it will be released in the rest of Europe in midsummer. Welcome, the singer/songwriter Jonsu and the bassist Heini, the founders of the band.

J: Thank you.

H: Thank you.

How did your morning start today?

H: Mine started well by walking my dog.


You'll have an album release concert today.


J: Yes, we'll play at On the Rocks at 10 PM. Welcome there.

This time your album will be released for a bigger audience. What kind of a breakthrough do you expect?

J: Our biggest stress and focus was to make the album. We'll have to wait and see whether it will be bought by a hundred or a million people. We live from day to day.

H: It's wonderful that it will finally be released, so we can move on and have gigs.

But there must be some expectations, because right now there are two journalists from Switzerland waiting for you in the greenroom. How does it feel when people have such a big expectations on your album?

J: It's great to find out that people all over Europe are interested about us and our song has been played on radio and the video has been played on television.

H: I find it nice that our record company has the same passion to our music than we have.

J: Bands always think that their new album will save the world and is the best album ever, but it's great that this time someone else believes in it too.


You two are the founders of the band. Could you describe the other band members too?

J: We have a tough black haired drummer Laura, a blond dirty-minded keyboardist Sirkku and a sport enthusiast guitarist Jenny.

Nice descriptions. Most people are familiar with Indica, but for those who aren’t, let’s watch a short video clip of your new material.

(In Passing)

Jonsu, that's quite different from your previous three albums, because now you sing in English.

J: In fact, we've made four albums before this one.


Okay. Why did you switch language right now?


J: An important factor was that Nightwish asked us to be their supporters in their Scandinavian and European tours (in 2007) and people began to get interested of us outside of Finland too. And it's better to sing in a language that they understand.

H: In fact, when we founded the band in - was it 2001 - we had both Finnish and English songs before we decided which language we’ll use.


So this is a return to your old style?


H: We've always had in mind that at some point we'll make an English album and this was a convenient time.

How do you expect your Finnish fans to receive this change?

J: At first I was scared that they'll slaughter us, but they've taken it surprisingly well and we've received a lot of positive feedback. And there are many listeners who have said that the old material was boring but the new material is great.

H: Even the Finnish media has taken it well. Usually when a Finnish band switches to English, the album will be knocked down immediately, but our album has got positive reviews.


Will this open your market to the whole Europe and perhaps to the whole world?


J: At least it will have a better chance to do so than our previous albums. It will be published in Europe, Australia and Japan about the same time and it may also be published somewhere else later. But we’ll have a lot of work already.

H: We’ll start from these countries.

Jonsu, how did the language switch affect to your songwriting?

J: It changed several things, because the English words have such a different rhythm and sound than the Finnish words. It was a long process which took probably ten times longer than writing Finnish lyrics. I wrote the songs with a Canadian poet Rory Winston, because I wanted to have a native-speaker listening to the lyrics. And since we rearranged the whole songs, it probably affected to your bass playing too, Heini.

Did the language switch affect to the arrangement, Heini?

H: Actually the vocals were recorded after the bass, so it probably didn’t affect to my playing so much.

J: So you didn’t think about the English lyrics when you recorded the bass?

H: Well, of course they were in my mind.

J: But otherwise we rearranged everything and wanted to change things a bit.

You already mentioned Nightwish. You succeeded well as their supporters. Can you be classified as a warm-up band?

J: A warm-up band!?

H: We started our international career as a warm-up band of Nightwish and it was incredible to tour with such a great band. And it was a good stepping-stone for us.

J: Currently it seems that we’ll have our own European tour in autumn. In Finland we’ll do our own gigs, but if we get a chance to do a big tour in Europe as a supporter in autumn, we’ll consider. It would be nice to play in front of ten thousand people again.

H: We probably can’t get such a big audience on our own.

J: You never know *grins*.

Are you now searching for a warm-up for yourself?

J: You could warm us up. Girls always need a warm-up.

Well, I meant a warm-up band… Your music video looks great even on international scale. You all are beautiful women and there is a lot of shine and glamour in the video. What’s behind all this glamour? Have you had this style from the beginning?

J: Our music has always been there behind the visual stuff. We’re just the slaves of our music and do what the music requires.

So thinking about the chicken or the egg, the music came first but you’ve also looked good from the beginning.

J: Thank you. You’re very handsome too *grins*.


Is this your regular look when you go out?


J: At least you, Heini, look pretty much like that every day.

H: There is no big difference, except that of course I try to choose better looking clothes when I’m going to stage than when I’m going for a walk with my dog.

J: Some extra diamonds.

When the band consists of five beautiful women, it’s called a girl band. Does the title “girl band” bother you?

H: Not necessarily. Someone has commented that this is what Spice Girls would sound like if they had instruments.

J: I think the comment was on some hate forum. This is happening again now when we are starting our career in Europe. It was similar in Finland in the beginning when people were surprised that we can actually play our instruments. But when we released the second album, people started to ask questions about our music. I suppose it’s normal that people will react in this way in the beginning.

H: I’ve already got used to it, so it doesn’t bother me much.

So it’s not a bad thing in pop or rock if you can actually play the instruments?

H: It’s a plus, at least in live concerts.

Have the music journalists given you feedback about your playing skills or have you received feedback only from your fans?

J: We’ve done this job such a long time that we’ve got feedback from everywhere. We’ve got both positive and negative feedback, but it’s normal in this business. You can’t expect that everyone loves you.

We mentioned Nightwish earlier. Let’s talk about Tuomas Holopainen, who produced your latest album. What has it been like working with him?

H: It’s been awesome. Tuomas is more like the sixth member of the band than a producer. He managed to disclose our best skills while making the album. He’s a great person and a great friend.

J: Yes, I agree.

What kind of help do you need from the producer while you can handle many things yourself? How did he improve your album?

J: Our producer has to be very co-operative because all of us have strong opinions and we wanted to be the co-producers of the album. I think that the producer is a kind of a mental leader in the studio. It’s common that the band members have musical disagreements, and it was nice to have someone telling “why don’t you girls do it this way”.

H: It’s also important that the producer can draw limits and can tell his own opinion if the band members have disagreements.

J: Tuomas also had his own great ideas during the process. He’s a talented guy.

Did I understand correctly that you made this album for a long time?

H: One and half years.

How can it take so long?

H: A good question. This album has been mastered in New York, London, Germany and Finland.

How many people did listen to it?

J: Many. We wanted to make the album without a record company, so we paid it ourselves and made it as perfect as we could. And when six fools start to make a perfect album, it will take some time.

H: It’s a surprise that it will be published already now.

J: We used all the money our band had, because I believe that you can invest the money to the same thing where it came from. And we didn’t have any restricting timetables either. It didn’t matter whether the album will be released in 2012 or 2008, as long as the album is something in which we believe.

But it’s good that you managed to publish the album when you’re still young and pretty.

J: Yeah. I’m glad that the day came when everyone said that “now it’s perfect”. But we had to wait for that day for a while.


I’ll ask a few basic questions in the end. Where does the name Indica come from?


J: Many people ask whether it’s related to cannabis, but that’s not true. When we were deciding the name of our band we were staring at stars and the sky was indigo blue. And we just altered the word a bit.

Are those tights and scarf indigo blue? I’m a bit color-blind.

J: I don’t think they are.

H: They’re turquoise. Indigo is darker blue.

J: We have to check this later. But even if we were wrong, the color we had in mind was dark blue.

You’ve said that your band is a group of friends. Are you all five truly friends?

H: Yes, we all are best friends.

J: Yes, and I’ve known Heini since we were very little.

And the fame hasn’t gone to your head?

J: No it hasn’t. I think it’s funny when people ask whether the fame has gone to our head. In this business? The whole band has worked hard the past six months and slept only five hours a day. It’s hard work.

H: And when you tour in small Finnish restaurants and go to the backstage, it’s usually very dirty and small…

J: …and you have to eat the cold pizza they have in the fridge. There is no glamour in this country. But it’s great. I’ve never wished for more and neither have the other band members.

Thank you. This was a good way to finish.

J: Thank you.

H: Thank you.



Still many interviews are to be reposted here...

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Radio Interview of Jonsu in YleX in June 10, 2010

translation by Niko

It's online in two parts
DEAD LINKS
and they are somehow edited wrong. For example, one of the ten questions is missing. I tried to edit the translation in a way that it would make more sense, but I haven't heard the original broadcast, so I don't know what was the missing question.


This is YleX Spot Check.

- Oh no! I would need our drummer Laura to answer for me. Do you remember that black haired tough-looking girl? If you say something to her, she’ll remember it even after hundred years. Especially if you say or do something stupid, she’ll remind you later.

I have ten quiz questions about Indica. The maximum amount of points is 12. It includes one point per question and two bonus points. How many points do you expect to get?

- I live in a moment, so I’ll probably get about five points.


Let’s find out. Let’s start from the beginning.


- Okay.

You were interviewed in the Free Your Mind website in 2003...

- *giggles*

What did you tell that you expect from the Indica career?

- I probably told then that I’m expecting - well, at least not a lot of money - I probably said that I’m looking forward to tour around Finland and make a lot of good albums.

You mentioned one particular thing: “I’d like to have as many gigs as possible and have a chance to play at...” Which place did you mention?

- Now I know! Wonderful, I have a very good memory. I wanted to play on the main stage at Provinssirock.

No you didn’t.

- I didn’t?

There goes your very good memory.

- Then it must have been Tavastia.

Yes.

- Well, I have a quite good memory.

I’ll give you half a point.

- Because it was my second guess?

Yeah. In which month was Indica’s second album Tuuliset tienoot published? And you’ll get a bonus point if you remember the exact date.

- The first album was released in autumn. We made this in summer and it was released at some point before Christmas. It was probably in September, October or November. One of those.

It is one of those.

- I’ll answer October.

Correct.

- Oh dear.

Try to guess the date too.

- 21st October seems somehow familiar to me.

That was close. It was 26th October.

- Oh no.

But you’ll get one point for the correct month.

- A whole point?

Yes. The next one will be a tricky question.

- Have I said something silly?

How many singles has Indica released during the career, including radio promos?

- Including radio promos? I’ll start from our first album. We released Ikuinen virta, Scarlett and the last single was Vettä vasten. The band demanded to publish it, although the record company was sure that it won’t be played on radio even once. But Indica believed that it might change the criteria that the radio channels use while choosing the songs. In reality, Vettä vasten wasn’t played on radio even once. But it was already the third single of the album. When Indica released the second album, we decided to keep our mouths shut and let the record company choose the radio singles. And the singles were Vuorien taa and the second single was... this is difficult... what was it... Pidä kädestä. So, now we have five singles in total. The third single was... Niin tuleni teen. That makes six in total. The first single of the third album was Linnansa vanki. What was the second single? Did we release more? I think we did. Could it have been Ikävänkantaja? So that was the single number eight. Then from the compilation album... wait a minute, we have released a huge amount of albums. There was also Valoissa before the compilation album. What did we release from that album? We released Valoissa... and something else... Pahinta tänään. I think that these two were the only ones. So, now we have ten in total. From the compilation album we released...

I’m already very impressed.

- ...Valokeilojen vampyyri was the first single of the compilation album. The second single was Murheiden maa. I think that it was released as a single. So, now we have 12 in total. And from the latest album, A Way Away, we have released one single so far, In Passing. So if I calculated correctly, we have released at least 13 singles, or maybe 14 or at maximum 15. I’ll say 13.

The correct answer is 15. But I’ll give you the point anyway, because the way in which you listed the singles was very impressing.

- Apparently I don’t suffer from dementia yet.

No you don’t. When you visited YleX Aamu in the December of the last year, you promised something to Juuso and Matti in the beginning of the interview. What did you promise?

- I think that at that time I promised that we’ll start to sell Indica boxer shorts.

Correct.

- I’m a girl who keeps her promises.

Is there now Indica boxer shorts in your merchandise section?

- I’m not sure if they are already on sale, but I talked about it with our German merchandise team and at least they promised to make those. So Indica boxer shorts will be on sale about the same time as A Way Away. We’ll see if they will be available at On the Rocks (June 3, 2010). I’ve received four packets of merchandise samples. Last time I got heart shaped Indica candies. Maybe next time I’ll get naughty Indica underpants.

The next question. How much does A Way Away CD+DVD cost in Nuclear Blast’s online shop? I mean the regular CD+DVD.

- I think that normal price of a CD is 19.90 euros, but since this one includes the DVD, could it be 25.90 euros?

I thought it would cost something like that. I my opinion it’s ridiculously cheap: 15.99 euros.

- Okay. They seem to be very consumer friendly. Well done, Nuclear Blast.

Do you pay much attention to the prices of your merchandise?

- I don’t have the price catalog in my head, but I’ve been surprised to see how different this merchandise and special edition culture is in Europe compared to what we have had in Finland. I talked with some fans and they were like “it’s wonderful that you’ll release the album, but I don’t know what to do, because it has seven different versions and they all contain some special extras. Nuclear Blast is known from this. They put in a lot of work in order to provide all kinds of funny and great things for the fans. The fans also told that they are taking part of some wrapping competition in which they could win some special version of our album. I think it’s great that the record company puts in a lot of work for the fans.

What’s the fourth track of your first album?

- The album begins with Ikuinen virta. The next one is probably Scarlett. After that... The fourth and fifth songs are usually my favorites... Could it be... I don’t know, but I’ll guess Surusilmä. No, that’s probably a wrong answer. I wonder if it’s even on that album. My gray brain cells hardly even remember what songs there are. Could it be Saalistaja?

It’s Valehtelen.

- Of course.

You feature Nightwish in the song Erämaan viimeinen, which was released as a single in December 2007. In which words does the chorus start?

- Tää jylhä kauneus... wait... Tää jylhä kauneus ja ääretön yksinäisyyteni... Do I have to continue?

That’s enough. You remembered!

- It’s such a great song and great lyrics that how could I forget it? I would remember every word of that song.

How many stars did Indica’s third album Kadonnut puutarha get in the review of Findance.com? And you’ll get a bonus point if you remember the name of the reviewer.

- This is a very difficult question. I think that the first name of all reviewers is Antti...

That’s a correct answer.

- It can’t be! I wonder why so many reviewers are called Antti. Findance.com, how much could they have given? Since you ask this, it’s probably not one star. Could it be six out of ten? I’ll say eight.

He gave ten out of ten.

- Oh my god! Thank you, Antti. Now I’ll remember that review forever. By the way, maybe the funniest review of our new album is in Slovenian Playboy. I got a message from them and thought that they are asking us to pose in the magazine. And our keyboardist Sirkku got excited and would have wanted to go, but it appeared to be an album review in which our A Way Away album had got four bunnies out of five. So now we are definitely on top of the world.

Would the band accept to go to Playboy photo shootings if you were invited there? Or would you personally accept the offer?

- I wouldn’t go to nude photos. If they made an article about our music then I would consider. But we could send our keyboardist Sirkku there, because we always have to beg her to keep her clothes on when we are on stage.

This isn’t the first memory-related interview of Indica. In August 2007 the whole band participated in a memory-related theme issue of online media Juoni. You played the Moomin memory game, at least some of the band members played it. The journalist asked what kind of things you girls usually forget. According to Heini, the funniest thing was when Sirkku forgot something. What was Heini talking about?

- Knowing Sirkku, she has probably forgotten her home address and woke up in a wrong house, but Heini wouldn’t have dared to tell this. Heini was so cautious and decent at the beginning of our career that she probably told some nice story about Sirkku. It was probably... Now I know! It must have been this. When we had been invited to a party in which we were given the gold records, Sirkku forgot to come there.

Correct.

- Great!

You told in the same interview that the worst thing you could lose would be your diary...

- Yes! And it has happened once.

Really?

- It was awful. By the way, one funny forgetting happened during our European tour when we forgot our guitarist to a wrong bus. We were having a huge party and she wanted to go sleeping and we asked her to go to another bus. And in the morning we got a really angry phone call: “Where the hell are you?” We were like “Oops”, because we had already left the venue and the guitarist was still there. During the rest of the journey we had to carry the breakfast to her in the bed and massage her feet in order to make her forgive. But forgetting the diary was a horrible thing. I should destroy all my diaries. My calendar is practically my diary - I hope I have it with me now - I always write everything that comes in my mind to the calendar. My most stupid worries and stories are there. We performed in Kosovo for Finnish peacekeepers. When I came home, I thought that “Oh no, where’s my calendar”. I couldn’t find it anywhere and I realized that there were 700 men in the barracks and I left my diary there, the diary that includes all filthy stuff about me.

Did it include things like Xs to indicate how many times you’ve had sex with someone, such as Petri XXX?

- Or things like “The third soldier from the right was very handsome. He made me horny and I winked my eye at him.” Not really. But all kinds of crazy things I wouldn’t want the others to read. So I called there and said: “Hi, this is Jonsu from Indica. One of our girls, not me, might have forgotten her yellow calendar there, the one that has flower pictures on the cover. So if you find it, could you please send it back and please, please, please don’t read it.” And I didn’t even give them my home address in order to make sure that if they had read it they wouldn’t know that it was mine. And they were so wonderful that at least they claimed that they hadn’t read it and I got it back. But then I decided that I must have to start being more careful. After this interview I’ll delete all filthy pictures and messages from my cell phone, because the phone would be another thing I would hate to lose.

Now comes the moment of truth. I’ll count your points...

- Okay. Now we’ll see how honestly I’m able to estimate my knowledge.

One, two, three, four, five, six... You got six and half points.

- Okay. So I estimated myself a bit worse than I actually am.

Do you normally do that?

- Isn’t it what all Finns do? We tend to keep our feet on the ground and look down. That’s the traditional way to behave in Finland. Like someone said: “I’ll keep my jaw against my chest and get ready for the new disappointments”.

Important remark concerning the interview

Niko
Posted 23 June 2010 - 23:51


About Vettä vasten never been played on radio, Jonsu got her "revenge" when she and Heini were giving a radio interview after releasing A Way Away. The interviewer asked in the end, which song they want to be played on radio. Heini suggested Children of Frost, but Jonsu said something like "Let's not play it in summer." She asked them to play Eerie Eden, which is the English version of Vettä vasten. And it was played on radio, at least for that one time.


Interview with Jonsu in City-lehti 13/2010


translation by Niko

http://www.city.fi/artikkeli/Hevikeiju+Jonsu/3494/


By the way, they use the word Koura several times in the interview. I translated it to “the Arm”, because I interpret it as the arm of destiny or something. Other Finns, if Koura refers to some specific thing that has some specific word in English, please let me know.

Heavy metal fairy Jonsu

Jaana Rinne meets the Indica matriarch. Reviewers meet Indica’s album.

Still as a 12 years old Indica’s Jonsu, now 26, was so afraid of dark that she slept next to her mom and dad, and once his professor dad frightened her. Now she intends to conquer the world with her band and is looking for peace in the sea and forest. She is no longer afraid of dark.

I’ve spent the morning by listening to Indica’s In Passing. “That bad bad lake’s okay; it washed my hair”. It sounds like the fairies are beating the Arm.

Did you notice that those guys turned their heads when you walked by them?


- Oh. I didn’t notice anything.


I suppose people are often caressing you with long gazes.


- Noooooo. The Finns are so tactful that they won’t harass me. In other countries people are more intrusive.

We sit in Café Carusel. Why here near the sea?

- Sea and forest will flush all nonsense away. When you see a sea you’ll automatically start to breathe deeper. All mental hospitals should be built near a sea. I’ve said to my friends that if I some day become crazy, please send me to the sea in a sail boat.

The sea has the freedom that you lose when you get oppressed. And in the end, we are made of water. Your father is a nuclear physicist and you composed your first symphonies when you were six years old. Have you inherited your father’s mathematical talent?

- Composing and mathematical talent go together. But no. Although math was quite easy for me at school, I wasn’t particularly interested about math, chemistry or physics. My father is a mad professor. Once I asked him to give me a lecture, because I wanted to know what he does at work. I didn’t understand much of his two-hour lecture, but the stuff sounded interesting.

Mad professors and artists create kind of dreamlands which expand to dream universes.

- True. When you glaze long enough one spot, you won’t see anything else.

Your native town is Espoo. What colour is Espoo in your mind?

- Green. I spent my childhood in a green magic forest. I got awful traumas there. One of the worst was eating an earthworm. I did it in order to become a member of my sister’s witch club. Another scary experience was when my mad professor dad decided to frighten us. He was hiding with a dog. We heard growling and run away. After the incident I didn’t talk to my dad in two weeks. Mother was angry.

You were afraid of dark and you slept in your parents’ bed until you were 12 years old. Did you enjoy being afraid?

- Yeah. When I was a kid I liked the adrenaline that was caused by fear, but when I think about it now, I think that it was silly, because there are truly scary things in this world. Our favourite play was a horror house where we threw dolls against the wall. When our parents weren’t home, we persuaded our big brother to rent horror movies for us. I got rid of my fear of dark only a few months ago. I was alone in a cottage in the middle of a forest. I was so scared that I almost got crazy. It was a hysterical situation: a mad redheaded woman singing children’s songs in a small cottage. I sang until the fear faded away. After that the fear hasn’t come back.

I’m afraid of forests. I fear that the Arm would grab me and no one would find me.

- Being afraid of a dark forest is a funny thing, because forest is a safe place. You can hide from the Arm there. I’d been wondering whether you can become crazy because of fear. I didn’t. I woke up as the same person in the morning.

Let’s talk about music. Could you tell me about your violin and symphonies?

- I wanted a violin, because it’s such a beautiful word. My mother gave me a violin when I was four. I believe in destiny, and becoming a musician is related to certain fatal coincidences. I was already at the age of six so afraid of entrance examinations that I wanted to become a professional musician. So the Arm was there. The first record I got included Chopin’s waltzes and I loved them. I practically only listened to classical music until the age of 13 and I went to concerts with my mother. The mother has told that when the concert started I fell asleep in half an hour. The music lulled me to sleep. The Arm has no ground in music.

So there is no place for evil in Indica’s music?

- You may feel down, but there’s hope in our melancholy. One of the biggest reasons in my career choice is the healing power of music. Certain life situations can be so shocking that words can’t describe it. Then you can feel upset through music.

Could you consider having a concert for fun in a mental hospital or a drug rehab house for a marginal audience?

- Certainly. I could also consider performing to old people. I visited my 97 years old grandaunt two weeks ago. When I sung Sateenkaaren tuolla puolen (Over the Rainbow) I saw joy spreading all over her. My grandaunt is an awesome person. When she was 93 years old she said that she had smoked so long that it’s time to stop. Now she sighs that she can’t get rid of life. Nowadays people are afraid of unhealthy life. Fear of death?

You come from the old world, from the warmth of a fireplace. Modern musicians run by diesel and prefer mechanical air conditioning. How do you avoid becoming a product?

- Music is the chief of everything. I’m a servant of the music. I look like my music and want to live like my music.

How do you manage schedules?

- When I was at the airport in Paris I realized that I had left my 250 years old, helpless, dear violin to a cafeteria. I thought that I’m moving too fast. It’s too easy to drink a lot of coffee in order to sleep only a few hours at night, but at some point there is a limit. I learned to say no. There is a good reason for people having two free days every week. When you work seven days in a row, your brain starts to work slower and you’ll work slower and worse.

If someone doesn’t already know, Indica has just released their first English album A Way Away through a German heavy metal record company Nuclear Blast. The band paid the making of the album and sold the album to Markus Staiger. The record company uses 500,000 euros for marketing. Indica has been in the covers of German magazines, you work together with the Witches & Vampires game and the UCI movie company.

- Oh no. Those things were organized by the record company. The most important thing is that the album is exactly like we wanted it to be and that we have a European tour in autumn. Earlier we’ve had one European and one Scandinavian tour with Nightwish.

How did it go in Germany, at Rock Am Ring concerts in Nuremberg? I heard that German youngsters organize “drink alcohol as much as you can” events. Was the Nuremberg audience in a good condition?

- For a Finn it looked familiar. I haven’t drunk much alcohol lately. My work includes a lot of promotion and representation abroad and I don’t want to hug people too hard and snarl in those events. But I intoxicated myself in the album release party at On the Rocks in the safe ground of Helsinki. But the good thing is that when you don’t have time to party, you’ll stay healthy.

Why so many girls stop trusting their abilities as a songwriter and start supporting their boyfriend?

- In fairy tales the princess is unhappy until the prince rides there and makes her happy. That’s a crappy illusion. You’ll be happy if the voice between your ears is happy. I just watched a movie in which the girls were unhappy until they found Mr. Right. Pleasing men makes you smaller. At some point I had become so small that I almost disappeared. I wouldn’t do so anymore.

Indica has played ten years in Finland having hundred concerts per year. What kind of a rider do you have?

- I’ve told the Germans that I’ll work from morning to night, but I need food in every five hours. Without food I’ll become peevish and I’ll faint. When the Germans rented a suite for me the first time, I told them not to waste money to that kind of things. I don’t long for luxury. I just want to have gigs. Nothing is as important as being close to people. Generally: the higher walls you build, the lonelier you are.


Reviewers’ comments

We asked music experts to evaluate Indica’s new album.

We asked:
1. How does the album differ from Indica’s earlier albums?
2. What’s your school grade for the album (4 being the lowest, 10 being the highest)?
3. Will Indica get a breakthrough abroad?

Finnish Idol referee Jone Nikula
1. The album is composed more professionally. You can hear their experience. And it’s a positive thing.
2. Excellent.
3. Yes. If I had to bet some band, I would bet Indica.

City’s music journalist Juhani Sirén
1. It fits to European mainstream and has a rockier production. You can hear Holopainen’s visions and Jonsu’s advanced singing voice.
2. 9+
3. Yes they will (hopefully).

Rumba’s album reviewer Samuli Knuuti
1. Indica’s women have been made supernumeraries in their own music.
2. 5-
3. Even David Hasselhoff and knödels are popular in Germany, so everything is possible.

Voice’s music executive Sami Virtanen
1. It’s more heroic. Tuomas Holopainen has enlarged the songs well. The songs are rockier.
2. 8
3. They have potential to get a breakthrough.


The article includes a short video clip DEAD LINK? too. http://www.city.fi/antitv/klippi/26707/

Here’s the translation:

Can I start now? Hi! We’ve taken photographs for the City magazine in a forest and there were at least a million thousand mosquitoes. Now I’ve liquored my whole body by cortisone. I still look like I had the plague or something. The clock is 12 and in four hours I’ll fly to Germany again. I hope that the photographer Ville will find a nice picture so that I could pack my stuff and go to sleep. I hope you all have a great summer. Remember to rest. Bye-bye!

(You can see the picture if you click the link in the beginning of this post.)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:
You were interviewed in the Free Your Mind website in 2003...


So, there was an interview already in 2003, before the release of the first album, wasn't there?

Still much stuff waits for reposting in this topic...

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PostPosted: Sat 26. Jan 2013, 12:39 
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it seems this interview (2003, before the release of the first album "Ikuinen Virta") was never translated. Will anybody be so kind to translate it?

http://www.freeyourmind.fi/jutut/2003/b ... indica.php

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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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PostPosted: Sat 26. Jan 2013, 14:39 
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So here's the FreeYourMind interview. After reading it I couldn't help thinking that ~9 years is a very long time. I put some links into it, as it seems to contain a lot of Finland-specific things that only make sense with some background information.



We interviewed the band that will soon be the talk of the scene. They're 17-18 years old, yet very professional musicians considering their age. And that's not all: they write their own songs! The girl band Indica made a recording contract with Sony Music in the spring. Their debut album is hitting the shelves next spring. The band is already working on the album. The backing tracks for three songs have already been recorded. The singer-guitarist Jonsu and the bass player Heini that we interviewed have had a good time making their first album. They're very excited and motivated to work in a new studio environment.

They've been playing at the Band School of Northern Helsinki as a band for 4 years now. They actually write their own songs. Jonsu composes and writes lyrics, and the band does the arrangements together.

J: The songs are mostly about life and people.

Jonsu hasn't had great trouble with composing; she seems to be able to write songs in a steady stream. What's her best time for songwriting?

J: Well, I like to write songs at night, because I'm more in the zone. It seems I can't write songs in the morning.

The band has a fair distribution of workload in the song-making process.

H: Jonsu writer the songs and the lyrics, and together we all do the arrangements.

Describe your debut album: what can we expect?

J: Well, I'd say it's Finnish pop-rock in the minor key. Someone smartly described our music as progressive pop.

The music they listen to is not quite as Finnish or pop-rock as their own work. Jonsu likes The Cranberries* while Heini likes The Ark and especially their live shows. Do these bands affect your own work?

J: Well, I guess we're influenced by everything that happens around us subconsciously all the time. We have background in classical music to draw influences from. None of us has any particular idols.

Would you say that Indica is from "stadi"**?

H: Maybe we are now that we practise in Suutarila and three of us live in Helsinki.

J: NO! I'm rooting for Olari city.

Heini, Jonsu and Sirkku are secondary school graduates. Jenny and Laura are still studying at a gymnasium.

What will you do when you grow up?

J: Probably a musician/composer.

They all think they're going to spend their time on music in the future.

What do you expect from your Indica career?

J: As many gigs as possible and of course a chance to play at Tavastia.

Tours and especially festivals pique Heini's interest. They've already had some experience on travelling.

H: We were in Tallinn for a photo shootout. That trip was great fun.

J: It was alright. We ate, and occasionally stood up in one place or sat down. We were there for a couple of days, but our schedule left little time for partying.

Will there be music videos due to the album?

H: There will be one for the first single, but we haven't really thought about that yet.

Jonsu and Heini think it's horrible that Jyrki was cancelled.

J: It's terrible!

H: It's shocking, because you don't have too many chances to see music videos regularly. There's Sessions on SubTV, Levyraati on MTV3, and NRJ Top10 at Nelonen.

J: And for example sports gets too much TV time. I'd like to see at least three hours of music per week, or per day.

In general these two don't seem like girls that are glued to the TV screen.

H: I watch Levyraati and the occasional interesting documentary. There are no series that I really watch.

J: I'm not an addict for The Bold and the Beautiful yet, and I hope I'll never be one. Sometimes I might watch a good movie.

Jonsu and Heini recommend the Band School for young people interested in music. There young people can find other young people interested in music. It's a good hobby and a great way to make new friends. Also it's fun, and even starting bands have a chance to perform in proper concerts. Jonsu and Heini met Laura and Jenny there. They knew Sirkku from gymnasium and asked her to join the band.

They have good facilities for practising at the Band School. Before, they had to use youth centers and other 4m^2 rooms, where they had great trouble cramming into. The Band School has provided them with greatly improved conditions and opportunities for practising.

How often do you practise?

J&H: About 4 times a week, 4 hours at a time.

In addition to the Band School Jonsu takes piano lessons at Espoo Music Institute. Sirkku also takes piano lessons, while Jenny takes guitar lessons. Laura and Heini don't take extra lessons.

Do you have the time for hobbies other than music?

H: Not really.

Do you think you'll be compared to Tiktak a lot?

J&H: Our music is completely different, and we make our own songs. But if you want similarities, then I guess we're all girls. And we're both real bands, i.e. we're the ones doing the playing.

* I assume it's The Cranberries. The article is full of linguistic errors and a steady stream of typos.

** As a non-local I find it difficult to describe it accurately, but basically Finland can be clearly split into two parts: "stadi" (i.e. the "city", a small area in/near the center of Helsinki) and "bönde" (i.e. the "countryside", the rest of Finland). Everyone who is worth more than the muck on the sole of your boots is from stadi, whereas people from bönde are pretty much cavemen - or so the most fervent of believers seem to think. Someone with more knowledge might want to correct me if it seems that I'm completely making this stuff up.

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PostPosted: Sun 27. Jan 2013, 11:24 
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Here are my translations of three old YleX radio interviews. The first one is a "previously unreleased" translation while the other two are old translations I originally posted on the old Nightwish forum (which is now offline).


October 2009 (YleX Radio Interview with Jonsu)

This interview was broadcast on October 21, 2009. I means the male interviewer Ile and P means the male interviewer Peltsi.

I: Once again, YleX Iltapäivä has a guest. Jonsu, you’re in a historical spot because the legendary ice-hockey coach Juhani “Tami” Tamminen was here before you and used the same headphones.
- Oh.

I: So, he has warmed-up the headphones and maybe also the seat for you.
- I see.

I: By the way, is the seat still warm?
- It feels good.

P: I have to say that your posture is much better than Tami’s. I: Yes it is.
- Okay.

I: He’s a former ice-hockey player, so he has got used to bend his knees and look at the ice. P: He should start stretching his inner hip muscles. As I said earlier, our guests are getting prettier and prettier. I: That’s true. We are going to the right direction. P: Indica’s compilation album Pahinta Tänään was released today. This one is a tough question: Jonsu, what has been the worst thing today for you?
- Unfortunately I have to blame your information department because I was told that your address was Radiokatu 5 and I got a drive to far, far away from here and had to walk here in that freezing breeze. So, I could say that I’ve had quite a perfect day since that has been my biggest worry.

I: Hopefully you don’t catch a cold because in that case we would share the blame.
- That’s true. I’m going to ask you to pay my sickness benefit.

P: Our economics department will handle your request. But there’s an explanation for the misinformation: our address has changed. I: For some reason, the name of the street was suddenly changed. P: Helsinki hasn’t even participated in a consolidation of municipalities, at least not yet. I: Jonsu, we’ve got used to associating Indica… if we described it as a legendary creature, Indica would be a fairy… an aerial fairy, or maybe even a siren, but not necessary a vampire. So, why is your new single called Valokeilojen Vampyyri? This is from a completely different genre.
- In fact, we may actually be vampires. I can tell you a secret. I used to have long vampire teeth, but they’ve been ground. Actually, they are still a bit vampire-like.

I: That’s true. You’ve got very sharp teeth. P: They’re sharp indeed.
- So be careful, boys.

I: Peltsi took a step backwards. P: Yes I did.
- And they used to be twice as long.

I: Why did you… P: So, you had natural vampire teeth?
- Yeah. I don’t know…

P: Have you ever asked your parents about this?
- Well, my dad doesn’t look like a vampire at all, so maybe some other man is responsible for this.

I: Do your parents sleep all days in an underground cellar? Anyway, why do the dentists grind people’s great-looking natural vampire teeth? In my opinion, it’s sad that they are shortened. P: Did they affect your bite or were they ground for cosmetic reasons?
- Actually, I don’t know for sure. I started to regret it a bit when I got older. When I was a kid I naturally wanted to get rid of anything that was unusual or personal and wanted to look the same as my friends. But now they could be a cool detail. And I could use them to tear people’s necks.

I: Yeah. P: Yes. I: So, Indica’s compilation album Pahinta Tänään was released today and the first... the new song is Valokeilojen Vampyyri. You’ve told that you wrote it when you were 13 years old and you don’t like the fact that you wrote it as a 13-year-old… or how did it go? Could you tell it in your own words
- Well, I don’t remember for sure whether I was 13 or 15, but I wrote it as a kid. And for some strange reason that song used to be our fans’ favorite song, although it’s not a typical Indica song. And the band members demanded to include it in the compilation album and in the end I agreed and it became a funny track.

- -

P: Jonsu, since musicians tend to be a bit ashamed of the songs they’ve written as a 13 or 15-year-old, did you feel the same about this song?
- Yes. I have to admit that when the girls first suggested recording this for the compilation album, I was a bit ashamed. I thought that I should rewrite the lyrics and change the arrangement and everything, but then I realized that it would be pointless. Compilations are made for fans and other listeners. They aren’t usually band members’ favorite albums. So, this is the only album on which that song could be published. And when I got over with thought that I was recording something I wrote as a 13 or 14-year-old, it was fun to make it.

P: So you felt that as an artist you have to accept your history?
- Yeah, and I also accepted that I can make something that differs from my normal style.

I: Releasing a compilation album is usually what old bands do. So, why do you beautiful young women want to release a compilation album?
- Well, we’ve already published four albums, so we are seniors in Finland. Just kidding. Seriously, the record label suggested this and the band went to have some coffee and listed the pros and cons, and in the end we decided to make it. So, many things affected our decision.

P: What were the main cons?
- Of course we considered whether it’s smart to publish a compilation album at this point of our career. And choosing the songs was tricky. Well, the timing was probably our biggest concern.

I: In my opinion, four albums is enough for a compilation album because I’ve seen compilation albums from bands that have barely published one or two albums. So, it doesn’t feel like a rip-off.
- That’s true. We wondered if this was too early, but we’ve released quite a lot of singles already and the song Ruusupensaat was dropped from the previous album although it was one of my favorite tracks. We wanted to publish it somewhere and we had two completely new songs as well, so this was a good channel for them too.

I: The vampire theme… I’m generalizing a bit now, but I think you’ve earlier had a “maid in a castle” theme. But it is a recession now and vampire movies are getting more popular. There are Twilight movies and so on. So, couldn’t the vampire theme be Indica’s new direction?
- Damn! I hadn’t thought about the Twilight movies. So, it was actually very well calculated to release this song right now.

P: Who knows, maybe your vampire teeth will grow back.
- Yeah. Maybe I should keep your suggestion in mind because we’re going to make a new album at some point. So, maybe.

I: At least you could make a music video with a vampire theme: long staring gazes, shining teeth.
- Well, our keyboardist Sirkku adds some vampire theme to this music video, although we can’t show everything on screen.

P: So it includes some secrets. But the whole band doesn’t necessary have to be vampires. It’s enough if some band members are. And isn’t it possible today that a vampire can be everyone’s friend?
- Yes it is. Vampires are hot now.

I: So, now you’ve released the compilation album. What is Indica going to do next, Jonsu?
- Well, we will have gigs round the compilation album until Christmas. And some gigs next year too. And then… we have plans up to next summer, but I’m not allowed to talk about it yet.

I: I see. You have to keep it on yourself. You mentioned that Valokeilojen Vampyyri has long been on your fans’ wish list. Since you’ve now released it on the compilation album, you can’t refuse to sing it live.
- That’s true. Singing this live is always fun and it was pretty wild at the studio when we recorded it because we felt many years younger, which made the topics of our discussions even lower. I don’t know… I tried to call Liina from our record label in order to ask whether our second single Murheiden Maa is released already. But she didn’t answer the phone, so maybe I revealed it too early, but the second single is coming soon.

I: Don’t worry. All kinds of revelations are allowed here. By the way, what is a stereotypical Indica fan like today?
- It’s hard to answer.

P: A 62 years old family man?
- A 62 years old pervert family man. Not really. It varies. There are about 10, 20 or 30 people who come to see almost every gig, but the rest of the audience varies depending on the place.

I: So you have some groupies too?
- Yeah. We have some fans that I know by name and recognize easily. Like probably all bands, we have gigs mainly at bars and other age-restricted places, but we try to have gigs for kids too.

P: The fans that follow the band all over the country would deserve to be in the limelight. As far as I know, the only (Finnish) artist whose fans have been on TV is Jari Sillanpää. No pop band has introduced their fans in public.
- True. Maybe there should be more TV programs about fans. And fans have become more important now when you get music from everywhere. So, people who buy albums today are supporting the band and expressing that they want the band to make more music in the future. So, maybe fans are now even more important than before.

P: So, when everyone is complaining that album sales are dropping because people download music from all kinds of websites, loyal fans are becoming more important?
- Exactly. And naturally fans are vital for any band. So, thank you to the people who maybe even buy this compilation album.

I: Jonsu, your band has toured in Europe with Nightwish. What kind of goals does Indica have for touring abroad in the future?
- In the future… we’ll probably have gigs both in Finland and abroad. And in my opinion, both Finnish and English languages have their own strengths. I can promise that we won’t abandon Finland completely, but we’ll reveal our plans a bit later.

P: Maybe you could invent your own secret language for your lyrics.
- Well, Sigur Rós did it already, so it would be an old idea.

I: Thank you for the visit, Jonsu.
- Thank you too.


December 2009 (YleX Radio Interview with Jonsu)

This interview was broadcast on December 15, 2009. There are two male interviewers, Juuso and Matti, but I can’t tell which one is which, so I wrote the translation as if there was only one interviewer.

Our guest is Indica’s Jonsu. Good morning. In order to continue our theme of the day, we’ve checked the merchandise section of your website and you have only few products for men. Why don’t you sell, for example, Indica boxer shorts?
- I promise that right after this interview I’ll make a couple of phone calls and they will be available within two weeks.

Yay, you saved my Christmas. My size is S or M.
- Any other requests?

Could they be loose ones? I don’t like tight underwear, no matter how sexy they are.
- Okay. Maybe we’ll start to sell both types.

They must have an ornamental finish along a seam and buttons *laughs*. What’s up with Indica?
- We’re fine. I slept well last night after spending the last week in Hamburg. On Saturday we had the record company’s Christmas party and on Friday a wonderful concert at Masala (in Kirkkonummi).

Was your trip to Hamburg a business trip?
- Yes, it was pretty much a business trip.

Indica is releasing a new album and this time the lyrics are surprisingly in English. Why did you switch language?
- When we started our career, we tried to write English lyrics too, but they were awful because I couldn’t speak much English then. We thought that maybe some day we’ll switch to English. And when we had the Scandinavian tour with Nightwish in 2007, we started to think about it more seriously. Tuomas said that he would like to produce the album and that was it. We thought that why not.

How good was your English when you decided to make the English album?
- At that point it was much worse than now. I had to work for it. I wrote the lyrics with a New Yorker poet, because I didn’t trust that as a Finn I would be able to write perfect English. And I think that it was a really good idea.

So you wanted to hear a native-speaker’s opinion?
- Yes. A native-speaker understands many things in a different way. Sometimes I thought that I'd written a perfect sentence, but that wasn’t always the case.

For sure, it’s important to pay attention to the content when you switch language. How well can you internalize the message of English lyrics?
- Nowadays well, but we have made this album for two years. And this was the first time I wrote the lyrics with someone else. It took some time before we started to understand each other’s thoughts.

You also said that your pronunciation wasn’t perfect earlier. Have you taken English courses or studied singing in English?
- I have practised English pronunciation, because singing with a strong Finnish accent isn’t a good idea. In some genres, like opera, the singer can have a strong accent, but in pop/rock a strong accent isn’t desirable. It could steal the listener’s attention.

Unless you happen to be Björk.
- It’s true. Some artists are able to use their accent as an advantage.

What’s the most difficult word that you have tried to learn to pronounce?
- Oh no. I can’t answer that question early in the morning.

You made a deal with Nuclear Blast. It’s known for heavy metal and your producer is Tuomas Holopainen. Is your new album going to be heavier than earlier albums?
- No, it won’t. That’s not our goal. The album was almost ready when we signed the contract with Nuclear Blast. I don’t think that heavy metal arrangements would improve Indica’s music.

We were worried about this. So, your mystical troll style is still there?
- Yes.

When you decided to switch language, was English your only choice? Or did you consider, say, German or Portuguese?
- *Laughs*. No. I can say only a couple of sentences in German and they wouldn’t be suitable on the album.

*Laughs*. I see. How have your fans reacted to the language switch?
- Let me think... Many new fans, who discovered Indica during the (Scandinavian) tour, are excited, but I’m sure that some fans are disappointed and wonder if Indica will ignore Finnish fans from now on. But that’s certainly not the case. We will continue to work in Finland with Sony BMG in the same way as earlier.

Will you sing in Finnish or English when you have concerts in Finland?
- In Finnish. I can’t think of us ever performing here in English. But you never know.

If Indica becomes famous abroad, will you translate your old songs to English? Eternal Stream (Ikuinen virta), for example.
- This album will include old songs that have been translated to English and arranged for the orchestra. But the next album will probably contain only new songs.

Can you reveal at this point what’s the leading thread of the new album?
- Well, I hate to talk about the songs before they are released. I could keep talking and talking, but people wouldn’t know what I’m talking about. So, I’ll come back in January or February and give you our new single. We can talk about the leading thread then.

You wrote the lyrics with a New Yorker poet. Did you manage to include the old Indica style, the mystique of the Finnish forests?
- In my opinion, there’s even more mystique than earlier. I think that our new music is even more atmospheric than before and closer to movie style. It’s definitely not heavy metal.

I would still like to ask about the leading thread. You mentioned the movie style. Which movie would describe the style of the album?
- I hope it would be one of David Lynch’s movies, because I’m a big fan of Angelo Badalamenti. But I don’t know. You have to listen to yourself when the album is released.

What kind of song names do you have on the new album?
- Let me think…

Eternal Stream?
- There is no Eternal Stream. One is Children of Frost. It could be… well, I can’t reveal you more, because I don’t know yet which song will be our first single.

Okay. We won’t bother you anymore with this subject. So, in February we will hear new Indica and you have to keep your promise to come back here. We’ll see you then.
- Yeah, let’s do that.

Thank you, Jonsu, for visiting us.
- Thank you.


April 2010 (YleX Radio Interview with Jonsu)

This interview was broadcast on April 15, 2010. I means the male interviewer Ile and J means the female interviewer Jenny.

I: Our guest is… Or let’s put it this way… If this happened in the 1500s I would be scared because there are two redheaded wit… women in the studio. So, our guest is Jonsu from Indica. Welcome.
- You should be scared of us also in the 2000s.

J: I’ll give you a pen, so you can throw it at Ile when he gets too annoying. I: Jenny likes to throw things. Yesterday she threw scissors at me. It was a bit scary.
- Oh!

J: The blade in front. I: Fortunately it was the other end of the scissors that hit me. Otherwise there would be someone else instead of me in the studio today. J: But Jonsu, hi!
- Hi.

J: Welcome. I: And now you have the pen firmly in your hand. Soon you’ll throw it…
- Are you aggressive towards women too, Jenny?

J: No I’m not. He’s just…
- So the red ones are allies?

J: And so are the ones who wear a cap. Wait a minute… you’re not wearing a cap. I: So you’re not allies after all. But hey, you switched to English. *In English*: So should we just do this all in English? Jonsu from Finland, how has your spring gone in this fine day?
- *In Finnish*: Let’s not do this in English because right now I remember only about ten English words, so I would have to repeat myself a lot. I’ve given a lot of interviews in English lately, so let’s do this one in Finnish.

I: Okay, we’ll do this in Finnish, but you’ve started to make songs in English. In my opinion, it’s great that Indica is trying something new. Why in English?
- Actually… Damn these headphones are annoying. I hear my own voice as an echo.

I: Adjust the volume lower.
- Okay... Actually when we formed the band about eight years ago, we made songs both in Finnish and in English, if the language of the early lyrics can be called English. But we had to choose which language we will use, and we chose Finnish. We started to consider English again when Nightwish asked us to support them in their Scandinavian and European tours (in 2007). We got more foreign fans and they demanded us to make material in a language that they understand.

I: So earlier you needed a dictionary in order to write English lyrics. J: And the result was probably something like a Google translation, not very understandable.
- Our dear fans have translated some lyrics to English and you may still find some of the translations on our website. I have to admit that it’s difficult to translate lyrics. If you do it word by word, the result will probably be tragicomic.

I: So you haven’t always been completely satisfied with your English lyrics. How about old songs? Have you translated them to English for concerts outside Finland? Or will you sing some of the songs in Finnish?
- The concerts outside Finland will probably be completely in English. Our first completely English concert will be in Berlin in May 5, 2010. Welcome there all hardcore fans, we’ll need you there. In Finland the album release concert is at On the Rocks in June 3, 2010. So, when in Rome do as the Romans do.

J: Have you translated any of your Finnish hits to English?
- Yes we have. Many of them are in the forthcoming English album.

I: What’s, for example, Linnansa vanki in English? J: Prisoner in her castle?
- We have performed Linnansa vanki in English during the tour and the song is called Snow White and Her Stalker. But unfortunately this song won’t be on the forthcoming album.

I: So that song won’t become on sale now?
- No it won’t, but you may find some low-quality video of it on YouTube.

- - -

I: So, our guest in YleX Iltapäivä is Indica’s Jonsu. What’s your biggest goal right now with Indica? You switched to English, so what kind of dreams does the band have?
- We’d like to be able to tour in many countries and let as many as possible to hear the evangel of our music. And things like that. We’ll start from scratch outside Finland and we have to work hard. This year we’ve probably spent more days abroad than in Finland. Next Monday we’ll go to Zurich in order to perform on radio. We’ll see. It’ll be interesting.

I: And people are anxious to see you in Germany. Being the supporter of Nightwish probably helped you become famous in Germany.
- I wouldn’t say that we are famous in Germany, but we released the single there a couple of weeks ago and the album will be released in June. But of course the tour with Nightwish was a big opportunity for us. We had a chance to reach a lot of people. And now we’ve already been signed to some big festivals in Europe.

I: According to the cover of your single In Passing, you play theremin in the song. And for the listeners who don’t know what it is: *quotes the Finnish Wikipedia* “Theremin is an electronic instrument designed by a Russian Léon Theremin in 1919. The instrument consists of a box that has typically two antennas.” How good a theremin player are you and how do you play this instrument?
- This makes me laugh, because if the Indica girls listen to this interview they’ll probably disagree, but in my opinion, I play it very well. I played it at Tavastia when we released our previous album. The girls tried to ban me from playing theremin, because in their opinion it sounded like a cat being tortured.

J: Could you demonstrate us how it sounds?
- It’s like *imitates the sound*. Actually it sounds like a musical saw.

J: It sounds beautiful. But do you need the instrument if you can produce the same sound yourself?
- Well, it’s the coolest instrument in the world. You’ll just move your fingers in the air and the sound somehow comes out of the box. Of course, I could try to sing like that my mouth closed and move my fingers in the air. Actually, this is a really good idea. If I won’t learn to play it correctly I can produce the sound this way.

I: Just keep humming and move your fingers. Where in Finland can you take theremin classes? Is this going to become a famous instrument in the future? If someone now wonders whether to start practising guitar playing or theremin playing, which one do you recommend?
- I recommend people to take theremin classes from me. The instrument will become very popular in Finland and I’ll promise to play it at On the Rocks, no matter what the girls say.

I: Excellent. So, the new single is In Passing. What’s passing, Jonsu?
- Probably my life. At least that’s how I feel right now. A while ago I said in an interview that it feels like we released the compilation album a week ago, although the album had been released four months ago. And I feel that I was 12 years old not so long ago. So, my life is passing.

J: So the childhood is over, as (the Finnish band) PMMP sings.

- - -

I: How did it sound like? The first time… Indica… Jonsu… in English?
- It wasn’t actually the first time I heard the song, if you meant the question for me.

I: But it was the first time for us. J: Ilkka and I almost started to cry. I: Or maybe it was your aching ear that made you want to cry. J: It’s true that my ear aches a lot right now, but not because of Indica. Actually, listening to Indica helped. It was like sappy nectar tricked to my ear in order to push the earwax away.
- Wonderful! I’ve always said that music has a healing power.

J: Yes it has. I: So, Jenny, did Indica heal you more than the garlic you tried before, the one that you pushed to your ear - when you were 23 years old - and needed a doctor to pull it away? J: In my opinion, they won’t neutralize each other. On the contrary, they support each other: Indica and garlic in the ear. I: Please send SMS messages and tell us what you think about the song. Jonsu will be here when we read your messages, so you can also send her questions.

- - -

J: “It sounded quite bright”, writes someone. I: “It works much better in English. In Finnish it sounds too much like Maija Vilkkumaa. Now you are more unique.” J: Vege writes: “Indica rules. I like this a lot. Jonsu, please come to play it in my 50 years birthday party.”
- Of course we’ll come, any time. Just contact Popgram’s Jake and we’ll come.

J: By the way, Vege continues that the birthday party is in January 31, 2013. I: At least you’ll have a lot of time to practise.
- Okay. Well, if I’m still alive then, I’ll be there, Vege. I’ll do my best.

I: Antti from Hämeenlinna writes: “Indica sounds good in English, as good as in Finnish. Jonsu has a sexy voice.” J: “English Indica sounds like the great Finnish band LAB.”
- Okay. This is the first time we’ve been compared to them.

J: What kind of comparisons have you heard earlier, besides Tori Amos?
- Usually we’ve been compared to artists like Maija Vilkkumaa, and outside Finland to Kate Bush.

I: “The song was like fairies’ jingle. It was really beautiful just like other Indica songs, but not quite as beautiful as the singer herself. Regards: your secret admirer.”
- These comments make me blush.

J: Let’s try this one. I: Read some negative feedback for a change. J: This one is actually a bit critical: “I love Indica, but this one sounds a bit weird. If you improved your pronunciation a bit, it would be better. Indica has always had beautiful lyrics, but your English doesn’t seem to be fluent enough.” How do you reply to that?
- I just say that you should have heard me singing this BEFORE I improved my pronunciation a bit.

I: “Indica works in English too: another great song from Indica. Thank you Indica and YleX.” You’re welcome. “A wonderful song. I’ve passed the time of my life during which I was able to live without worries. Now I have to stress about everything. Greetings to Jonsu”, writes Eltsu.
- Oh.

J: “Oh, when Jonsu started to sing, I got chills. I like Indica in Finnish too, but this version reached on a new level. It reminds me from LAB’s singer Ana. Wonderful, wonderful. Regards: Jonsu-looking Mea from Turku”. You have a competitor in Turku.
- Okay. Thank you, listeners, you are really cute, wonderful and sweet today. Or maybe these guys have just picked the most positive comments.

I: No, we haven’t. “Don’t tell my wife, but this wasn’t total crap at all. My work day has gone surprisingly fast”, comments Niko from a Scania truck. So, he likes this too.
- Thank you. Hugs and kisses to everyone.

I: Here’s a good question for you: “Is Indica going to perform also Sergeant Carolina (Kersantti Karoliina) in English during the European tour”, asks Sami from Imatra.
- We haven’t planned to do so, but never say never.

J: “The Baseballs should cover Indica too. A nice song”, writes someone. I: We also received the following message: “Greetings to Jonsu. There is no way that you would be allowed to play theremin at Rocks, unless you start practising it quickly. We’ll see you soon in Kirkkonummi”, comments the rest of Indica.
- *Laughs*. I’ll definitely play theremin there. I don’t remember if I already said it, but I received the third and final master tape today, so I, Tuomas, Tero and the girls are going to celebrate it in Kirkkonummi.

I: Have a nice party. Please give my regards to Tuomas and the girls. Thank you for visiting, Jonsu. J: Thank you.
- Thank you.

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Nico and Niko, thanks a looot!

Thanks also to Telajel for giving a link to 2003 year interview (it's she who's found it)

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"Dark art is not a devil thing, it's quite the opposite, it's a God thing. You truly find God on sadness, not on happiness. My darkest arts, my darkest thoughts are from heaven"
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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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Jonsu Interviewed by Scott Smith

http://www.maytherockbewithyou.com/May_ ... SU%29.html
I repost it here on case something happens to the above mentioned website

INDICA (JONSU)
Thursday, 5 August 2010

*Interviewed by: Scott Smith

Two tours with Nightwish, one platinum album and two golds in Finland, numerous top-ten singles - for Indica it seems that the only way is up. Tuomas Holopainen of Nightwish, who discovered the band and gave them his support, said: " Indica has such sights to show you! You will be spellbound for a lifetime!"

The Finnish girl group was founded in 2001 by schoolmates Jonsu (vocals, violin, guitar, keyboards, theremin) and Heini (bass), who had played together in a children’s string orchestra. Their line-up was soon completed by Sirkku (keyboards, clarinet, piano), Jenny (guitar) and Laura (drums, percussion). Five beautiful girls with just one thing in common: as fully fledged musicians, they’re all light years away from casting shows and musical triviality.

Nevertheless, success came their way pretty quickly: in 2003, they signed their first recording contract and began work on their debut album, "Ikuinen Virta", which spent 30 weeks in the Finnish charts and reached platinum sales. Like going from zero to 60 in three seconds, they’ve taken their country by storm with their contemporary mix of pop, rock, exotic instruments, Finnish melancholy and mystical, nature-inspired lyrics. The press promptly coined a neat description: mystic romantic pop.

The band has since released three more albums in Finland, two of which went gold, remaining in the charts for weeks. The last of the three, "Valoissa" (2008), was produced by Nightwish boss Holopainen who was also involved in mixing the band’s new album "A Way Away". It is a compilation of Indica’s best songs, re-recorded in English for the international market. The recordings were co-produced by Roland Spremberg (A-ha and Him, among others) and mixed by Mark Schettler (Simply Red, Bullet For My Valentine), just to mention a few).

May The Rock Be With You recently spent some time chatting with the band’s lead singer, Jonsu.

You have already released four albums in Finnish but “A Way Away”, is your first album in English. Why did you think that now was the perfect timing to release your first album in English?

I believe that always when I have to do something I get many signs and life was telling me that now it's time to do that (release an album in English). We started as a band about ten years ago and we had songs in Finnish and English but we decided to do the first album in Finnish and suddenly it became very successful in Finland and we soon forgot the English thing. That was until 2007 when Tuomas Holopainen from Nightwish asked us to join them on tour in Europe which started generating lot’s of interest in the band from abroad. I then just felt it was time we took that next step as we had seen every corner of Finland. Even though I love Finland it was time to do something new and I feel that our music is really hopeful and that there is a big market for our music outside of Finland.

Was it difficult to choose the songs you wanted to appear on A Way Away?

Yes there was indeed a lot of fighting and screaming and manipulating amongst the band haha. It took maybe 2 weeks. We get along great as a band, but always before we go into the studio all these storms come up lol! With our music, we can all be stubborn and we each had our favourite tracks which MUST be on the album! We also got lots of mail and messages from the fans saying “we really, really want to have this song on the album”, etc, etc. So it took a lot of time to find the list that everyone was happy with. We also did some extra songs that didn't end up making the album but may end up as bonus track on singles.

“A Way Away” contains songs from your past albums, now recorded in English and also musically some are now rather differen’t I believe. What were some of the changes you went for in a musical sense?

While we loved our original versions of the songs, there were certainly a number of things that we ended up doing differently on this album and if you ask my opinion, better! So we wanted to go even deeper into these songs, especially seeing some of these songs we wrote when we were young like 15 or 16 and now we had many more clever ideas. For some songs it meant making them stronger and adding orchestra and choirs. Some songs it meant the opposite and saw us taking things away and making the songs totally naked. For some songs like “Island Of Light” and “Eerie Eden”, we recorded with an orchestra in London and this time the orchestra gave a real soundtrack type feel to the album. But some songs like our next single “Precious Dark” ended up being a very different song in the finished version. Of course the language of English compared to Finnish means the rhythm of many songs is different and of course this means the melody changes as well.


How about lyrically, is it true you re-wrote all the lyrics for the songs, not just merely translate into English?


Well yes they are all brand new lyrics because I felt if we did translations we would just end up with similar versions of the original. I also wanted to give the songs the same mood and in almost all songs the stories changed from the original. In Finnish I have always written alone, this time the process was nearly ten times longer writing in English. I wanted to work with the poet Rory Winston, because I love his work. It was certainly an interesting process and worth it.

As the vocalist, did you find this album more challenging to record, given it was recorded in English?

It was a big challenge indeed and a lot of work for me. But now I feel that both Finnish and English come naturally to me. Nowadays we mostly play our shows in English, but when we play in Finland we still play in Finnish. But yes it sure was a lot of work, but a really interesting new challenge for me. Even the melody of the two languages is very different and how the words flow. English is a lot more melodic language and when you are singing, it may sound more beautiful, but Finnish is more exotic sounding!

Has there been any noticeable reactions from your Finnish fans with this release being in English?

Initially there were certainly some interesting reactions when we first started talking about singing in English and people started saying "oh what's going to happen, are you never going to perform in Finland again, what's going to happen to the songs....". Of course there were also some hardcore fans who wanted to keep the band exactly as it was and didn't want any kind of changes. Then when we got the producer, Tuomas Holopainen from Nightwish three was even more concern about what's going to happen to Indica. But now the albums done, the response has been really encouraging and even Finnish fans have been getting a lot of new things from the album because the music is so different to the versions they are used to. Of course non Finnish fans have appreciated finally being able to understand something haha! But I am sure that we will include some Finnish still in our shows and I am not saying I will never write again in Finnish. Right now though I am going to be concentrating on the English stuff.

You are now signed to Nuclear Blast label in Germany, which is known worldwide for predominantly heavy metal releases. How did you come to be on this label?

Well firstly we wanted to do the album alone and own the master etc before we started talking to different labels. The album was done already before we started offering it to different labels. We chatted to a few interesting ones, but we felt that Nuclear Blast showed the strongest passion and had the greatest belief in the album. When we met the guys I also thought we were sharing the same ideas. To me I feel that label is a dream label because they are a big independent label who can do anything they want and also I feel they are working for music and not for money. I felt that they had really good heart and strong beliefs. It was like wow, I want to work with them! Even though however they don't have any bands like Indica and doing a lot of heavier stuff, I believe it really doesn't matter. What is most important is you work with people who have a string passion.

I have to say that working with Nuclear Blast I now have a little bit more rock n roll in me because yesterday we were shooting a video for the new song “Precious Dark” and it was 22 hours of filming but I don't what happened to me as I am sitting here checking my legs and they are full of bruising...maybe it was someone hitting me with a bass guitar many times haha?

You just mentioned you had started working on a new video for the song “Precious Dark”, are you able to share with us what the concept is for the video?

I haven't seen the finished video yet, just some little clips whilst shooting but I think it's going to be a really different video. We were shooting in Germany and we wanted to have a little bit of dark elements to the video because the whole song Precious Dark whilst melodically it's a happy and poppy song, but the message of it is about the dark side of human beings and that world we hide inside. I have a good feeling about this video. It was really scary shooting it as we were deep down in the cellars of Nuremberg and there were some really scary places. I was terrified and last night when I was sleeping after the video I had awful nightmares about the place.

Have you commenced working or thinking about the new album as yet, or is the focus still well and truly on touring etc?

Every time I have some free time I love composing and I am doing it almost like all the time but I really haven't started thunking about the new album yet. This summer has been really really busy and now soon we will have a few weeks break. We will close down our phones and our computers and have a total vacation and after that and before the European tour we might think about the new album a little bit.

In the autumn we will have been together ten years and we have already started to plan our 10th anniversary tour!

Hopefully that will include Australia...

Yes I hope so, I really really hope so. We are planning to have a romantic holiday to celebrate, all five of us and then of course lots of touring! I really hope that an Australian tour comes one day soon.

All the best Jonsu with the upcoming tour and with the release of “A Way Away” into places all over the world..

Well thank you, it was my pleasure and great to talk with you. Hope to see you somewhere one day, I hope in Australia!


Interview with Jonsu in the Selvis magazine 2/2010


http://www.elvisry.fi/index.php?option= ... Itemid=200

translation by Niko


Check out the source, because it includes nice pictures too. The interview is a few months old, because I didn’t find it earlier, but it’s still worth reading. The original text includes also quotes from Indica’s songs, but I decided not to post/translate them here.

Jonsu’s shining songs

Indica appears to the world market

In the middle of the stage, surrounded by the band, there’s a young redheaded woman playing her violin. The violin is over 250 years old. The player is Jonsu and her clothing style is from the same era than her great sounding stringed instrument. The 9 years old band is called Indica. The other female musicians support the singer/songwriter Jonsu’s atmosphere. She is clearly the leader, both because of her charisma and because of her songs. Now this mystic romantic pop-rock band is going abroad.

- During the years in Indica I’ve learned human relationship skills. We are in contact or see each other almost every day. Now we’ve been travelling all over Germany and other countries. We’ve already done promotion and club concerts there, says Jonsu.


The girl from Espoo

Johanna “Jonsu” Salomaa (born in 1984) is from Espoo, more precisely from Olari. She lived in her native home until she was 22 years old. Jonsu’s father is a nuclear physicist, her mother is a music kindergarten teacher and she has two big sisters and one big brother.

- My mother had a big influence on me when I started to play violin as a four years old and went to music kindergarten. When I was six years old, I got a place as a student at Espoo music institute. At that point I played piano too and wrote my first instrumental compositions with notes.

- My teachers Anna-Maija Usma and Waldemar Hagers were very inspirational. I spent all summers practising and Waldemar even showed me Pink Floyd’s movie The Wall. I was like “WOW”. This started my early love to prog music, retrospects Jonsu.

She also read children’s books, such as Astrid Lindgren’s books and, of course, Donald Duck.

- I still read Donald Duck, because it’s a good spirit comic book. I use Donald Duck as a sort of a test: if I don’t have enough time to read it once in a week, I try to tell myself that my life rhythm is too busy. In Walt Disney’s literature there’s often a wonderful world and I like their funny, friendly humour.

Tapiola choir and rock bands

Jonsu sang in Erkki Pohjola’s legendary Tapiola choir and on children’s song albums. She sang her first solos before she learned to pronounce the letter S. Jonsu graduated from a music school, but not from the music institute. She quit studying as 15 years old when she formed her first band. She started to lose interest to classical music because she had become a teen rebel who listened to pop and rock. She wrote her first own rock songs, such as 500 Jeesusta (500 Jesuses) and Koff-illuusio (Beer illusion), which is still her band’s favourite song when they want to humiliate Jonsu publicly in a funny way.

- I liked The Beatles, The Cranberries, Tehosekoitin and Leevi and the Leavings. I also got interested about Kate Bush and Pink Floyd at the time when we released our debut album, tells the former rock rebel.

Jonsu’s first bands that had gigs were Profiili and Illuusia. Those bands had boys too. Jonsu composed, sang and played keyboards. Indica’s bassist Heini is Jonsu’s longtime schoolmate/bandmate. She was already a member in all those pre-Indica bands.


The first recording contract

Indica was founded in 2001. The young girls studied a few years at Peter “Petteri” Kokljuschkin’s famous band school in Northern Helsinki.

- Petteri got interested about our music in the school’s spring concert and became our manager. He helped us get a recording contract with Sony BMG and we began to have gigs.

- We didn’t intentionally aim to form a girl band. It just happened to become such because we got along so well. Petteri did a lot of work during his four years with us.

Jonsu has been responsive for Indica’s compositions and lyrics from the beginning. The arrangements are usually made together with the band’s musicians. Ikuinen virta was made lyrics first. After that, all productions have been made by composing the songs first with a piano and writing the lyrics later. This is how Jonsu describes the process:

- I’m not very analytical when I compose music. Mental pictures are the most inspirational. I listen to where the melodies lead. I believe that the melodies contain a story. When I write lyrics, I listen to what the composition wants to say. It’s quite a spiritual feeling.

- For me composing and writing lyrics are like eating and breathing. The spark will always remain in my soul, because I’ve done this since I was a little girl. The most important in music is to find the essence of the song and relay the feeling.

- As a young composer, before rock music, my biggest idols were Chopin, Mozart and Sibelius. Their tonal worlds made a big impression on me.


Fairy tales and mystique

In Jonsu’s personal lyrics you can often hear an exciting form, poetry and mystique. Indica’s early music moved in fantasy and fictional worlds. Later they have stepped to a more realistic direction. The lyrics of the song Valoissa include even some tragicomic aspects.

- During our first albums people often associated us to a forest and fairy tales. Music has always defined our visual aspect. I’ve always been intrigued by an imagination that humans would be able to transform themselves to music, cell by cell.

Jonsu is one of few Finnish singer/songwriters who have been able to keep the mechanical rights of their songs on themselves. It doesn’t go like that nearly always.

Laura, Heini, Jenny and Sirkku

Indica’s musicians spend nowadays a lot of time together, especially when they travel abroad. Jonsu (26) describes her close friends and band colleagues:

- Laura (23) is perhaps the most stubborn and speedy of us. She likes harder music than the rest of us and you can hear it in her drumming. Laura played classical violin as a child, just like I did.

- I’ve known our bassist Heini (25) from a child like the palm of my hand. We have a very similar taste of music. She’s one of the most stable persons I’ve ever met.

- Jenny (24) has variable moods and temper. She is our guitarist who loves sport and doesn’t like so much partying. Jenny and I have some common favourite bands, like Muse.

- Our keyboardist Sirkku (26) entertains us with her gimmicks. She is a funny, comical character who’s never ashamed of anything and who tells colourful stories.

- It’s great that the band is still in the original form. I respect our working friend team. Of course we have disagreements sometimes, but we have solved the conflict situations quite well. We love each other a lot and truly care about each other, thanks Jonsu.

The new, international album

Indica has made an important recording contract with German Nuclear Blast. The distributor is Warner Music. The music video of the In Passing single is currently playing on big music channels. The collaboration of Indica and Nightwish started in autumn 2007 when Tuomas Holopainen asked Jonsu to sing his Finnish song Erдmaan viimeinen. This was followed by about 15 concerts in a Scandinavian tour as Nightwish’s supporter. This led to a European tour about one year later.

- It was exciting to play in the first concerts in front of a big audience abroad. We practised to perform our songs in English. That made it even more exciting. But it was a great feeling and we received positive feedback.

- Nightwish’s musicians are really nice. They have feet on the ground.

Indica’s English album A Way Away was produced by Nightwish’s Tuomas Holopainen. The album was released in Finland June 2nd and in the rest of Europe and Japan June 25th. The album consists of old songs that have been rearranged and reproduced. On the latest two albums Indica has participated in the production team as co-producers.

Nightwish’s leader/songwriter has been known for a long time as an advocate of Indica’s music and as a fan of Jonsu’s personal singing. Tuomas Holopainen had a strong influence on this album too. The new album has a wild, sometimes medieval-like, pop-rock sound which is supported by a professional symphonic orchestra. The result is great on an international scale.

- Tuomas is a sweet person. Before our co-operation we talked for a long time about music. The most important thing for me is that people make music with all their heart. We have many things in common. We believe that music can change the world and people a lot. It can make our planet a better place to live, describes Jonsu.

- We planned for the production and arrangement for a long time with Tuomas. In a few songs we used also a big bombastic orchestra.

Jonsu wrote the lyrics of the new album with a Canadian poet Rory Winston. Rewriting the lyrics and learning the articulation was a long process, but it was challenging and worthwhile.


To Germany and farther on

Now Indica is living the brightest time of their career. They’ll have promotion and showcase concerts all over Europe in autumn. Now it’s time for Finnish girl bands and Indica will be the first. In summer Indica will perform, for example, in the two biggest European rock festivals.

- In Germany the record company’s representatives have been amazingly polite, supportive, open and excited. They have said that they are interested about Finnish pop and rock bands because of our melancholy and sound that they can’t find anywhere else.

- During these years our band hasn’t kept any long breath pauses. We’ve had a lot of concerts and between the tours we’ve made new albums. In Indica we’ve learned this profession and everyone does their work diligently, humbly and tries to do everything seriously.


The productions

Jonsu is the master of acting the part. She’s a positive person and a talented speaker. This is how Jonsu describes chronologically the albums that Indica has made during the past six years:

- When we were making the debut album, everything was new and miraculous. I remember that once I cried in the studio when I had been away for a while and the others had replaced a piano intro by a guitar intro in the album title song Ikuinen virta.

- We made Tuuliset tienoot in summer and in my opinion it’s the most cheerful of our albums.

- On the third album Kadonnut puutarha we wanted to try some new things: drum machine and different kinds of synthesizer sounds. Ikävänkantaja and Nukkuu kedolla are my favourite songs of this album. At this time the band lived in a crisis.

- Valoissa was the most pleasant album to make. Tuomas Holopainen worked as the producer. No one had pressure or stress. We enjoyed the summer at the wonderful Petrax studio in Hollola and had fun. We made and produced music with new enthusiasm.

- The production of A Way Away took 1.5 years. It was the hardest album to make, but it’s also the dearest album for us. We wanted to take a big leap forwards in production and arrangement. We tried to make the album as perfect as possible. Or course it was difficult to determine the perfect sound and arrangement. There were many opinions and sometimes it was quite a struggle.

- I thought that this new album would never become ready. We recorded it at Petrax in Hollola, at Boogie Park in Hamburg, at Air studio in London and at E-Major in Kerava. We struggled with the mixing and mastering in Finland, Germany and New York. Miraculously the day came when everyone agreed that the album is exactly as it has to be.

FILE

Albums

Ikuinen virta (Sony BMG) 2004
Tuuliset tienoot (Sony BMG) 2005
Kadonnut puutarha (Sony BMG) 2007
Valoissa (Sony BMG) 2008
A Way Away (Warner) 2010

Compilations

Pahinta tänään (Sony) 2009

Singles

Scarlett (2004)
Ikuinen virta (2004)
Vettä vasten (2005)
Ihmisen lento (2005)
Vuorien taa (2005)
Pidä kädestä (2005)
Niin tuleni teen (2006)
Linnansa vanki (2007)
Noita (2007)
Ulkona (2007)
Pahinta tänään (2008 )
Valoissa (2008)
10 h myцhässä (2008)
Valokeilojen vampyyri (2009)
In Passing (2010)

Music videos

Scarlett (2004), directed by Kusti Manninen
Ikuinen virta (2005), directed by Kusti Manninen
Vuorien taa (2006), directed by Marko Mäkilaakso
Pidд kдdestд (2006), directed by Marko Mäkilaakso
Linnansa vanki (2007), directed by Jesse Hietanen
Pahinta tänään (2008), directed by Jesse Hietanen, costume design by Anne-Mari Pahkala/Illusion Costumes
Valoissa (2008)
10 h myohässä (2008)
Straight and Arrow (2009), directed by Denis Goria
In Passing (2010), directed by Patrick Ullaeus

Indica on the world

http://www.nuclearblast.de
http://www.contrapromotion.com
http://www.indica-music.com
http://www.kingfooentertainment.fi

Grants

2006 Elvis ry: 6000 euros
2010 Luses: 1 month working support
2010 Esek: 1 month working support


Jonsu Wants “a Persecutor” for a Christmas Present

http://metrolive.fi/jutut/artikkeli/661 ... istelijan/ DEAD LINK

Transaltion by Niko

Jonsu, who is heading to Spain, dreams of a family Christmas

Jonsu, who led the Espoo choir in Kuorosota which ended yesterday, will travel to warm Spain next week to compose new songs for the Indica band.

- I think that I will come back to Finland for Christmas Eve. I would have a chance to stay longer because we will go to the studio only at the end of January. According to preliminary schedules the album should be ready in March. I’ve noticed that I require deadlines because otherwise I would start to drift and couldn’t finish anything, says Jonsu.

For Jonsu a chance to spend time with the close ones is more important than the presents.

- I often meet my friends on Christmas Eve. We drink a glass of hot mulled wine and give presents to each other, although the importance of presents has decreased with age.

Jonsu wishes socks and a wristwatch for Christmas presents from her mother.

- My socks are always different pairs, says Jonsu and continues:

- I’m learning to be everywhere in time. I believe that a watch that would persecute and stare at me all the time would help.


Jonsu eats mainly vegetarian food, so she will not taste ham in the Christmas table.

- Sometimes I eat fish, she reveals.

As a child, Jonsu spent one Christmas in Thailand with her parents.

- It’s the only time I’ve been abroad at Christmas. It was a little shock because Santa Claus looked different there. I thought that something wasn’t right, laughs Jonsu.

Indica’s Jonsu: I Will Go Alone to a Mountain!

http://www.seiska.fi/viihdeuutiset/_a26 ... +vuorelle/

Translation by Niko

The leader of the Espoo choir, Jonsu from Indica, is heading to a European mountain in order to relax.

Indica’s Jonsu, who led the Espoo choir in Kuorosota, will soon pack her suitcase and travel to a mountain in Europe.

- I’ll finalize our forthcoming album there. I’ve never travelled alone or even spent a lot of time alone. Now I thought that sometimes you have to be alone, told Jonsu after the Kuorosota final.

"I’m afraid of the dark"

You can’t go to Jonsu’s destination by car.

- I don’t even know if a mobile phone gets signal there. I’m also afraid of the dark, so I’m a bit excited. I think I will come back for Christmas.

"The new album will be groovier"

Jonsu visited Hamburg last week and made the pre-production of Indica’s forthcoming album.

- The new album will be a bit groovier, and it may not be as dark as our previous album. But at this point everything can still change. The first single will be published in spring and the album should be published in March.

KATO-TV: Indican Jonsu jouluhaastattelussa

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_8mgA4-OIE

Translation by Niko

the interview was published on YouTube on December 22, 2011. But the interview must have been made earlier because Jonsu posted her greetings from Spain on Facebook on December 20.

Anyway, here's my translation of the inteview:

Now we have Jonsu from Indica in our Christmas special interview. Jonsu, what does Christmas mean to you?

- To me, Christmas means friends, family, Christmas songs and a wonderful, warm feeling. At Christmas you don’t think about any bad or dark things.

Do you usually celebrate Christmas in a traditional way with ham on the table and… except that you’re probably… Are you a vegetarian?

- Yes I am.

So you probably don’t have ham on the table, but what do you have on your Christmas table?

- Well, I like all kinds of Christmas casseroles, except liver casserole, but I have to admit that I’ve never set the Christmas table myself. I’ve usually spent Christmas with my family. I’ve celebrated almost every Christmas in my life at my childhood home. It’s quite hard for me to go somewhere else at Christmas.

So do you still spend every Christmas at your childhood home?

- Almost. At least I try to visit there at Christmas.

What’s the best thing about Christmas? Is there a certain highlight that you’re anxiously waiting for?

- I’m a bit addicted to sugar, so I’m waiting for chocolate hearts. Just kidding. I wait for the evening of Christmas Eve. It’s nice time. We tend to play games then. And I like the feeling that you’re not in a hurry.

You have a lot of gigs and everything. Is Christmas the time to relax for you?

- Yes it is. Christmas is one of few holidays when we’ve never had a gig. Sometimes we’ve sacrificed New Year, but we won’t sacrifice Christmas.

Do you celebrate Christmas together with Indica or separately?

- We usually meet a day or two before Christmas Eve and have a little Christmas party together, but we don’t usually meet on Christmas Eve.

Have you written any Christmas songs?

- Yeah.

Many musicians have written songs for Christmas albums. Have you, and if so, can you reveal anything about it?

- In fact, the first Indica song, the one that helped us get a management deal is called literally Joulubiisi (Christmas song). We’ve considered, probably at every Christmas, whether we should publish it, but we haven’t done it yet.

Aren’t you proud of it?

- It’s a bit so-so. In a way I like it, but I’m not sure because it has, as Christmas songs often have, a bit corny lyrics. The lyrics are kind and cute, but I’m not sure if I want to publish the song.

Do you girls have a feeling that you will never make a Christmas album? Or is it possible in the future?

- Well, if we will feel some day that we want to make it, then we will.

But you don’t want to make a Christmas album now?

- Maybe we should publish Joulubiisi first.

That would be great.

- It would be a start.

Could you tell at the end, how are you going to spend this Christmas? Have you any plans already?

- I’m not entirely sure. This Christmas is still undetermined. I’ve considered a trip because one of my good friends moved to South America, to Costa Rica, to the middle of nowhere and founded a horse farm. And now it has become a wonderful hippie village with all kinds of artists and they would have a great New Year party. I might go there this year, but it depends on the recording schedules.

But now you have to decide quickly because there are only a few days until Christmas. It’s December already. But Merry Christmas to you, Jonsu.

- Thank you. And Merry Christmas to you and the listeners too.

KATO-TV Special: Indican Jonsu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nIjuTa7q_s

Translation by Niko

In the beginning it’s said that the interview was filmed before Kuorosota began, so apparently it was filmed in October 2011. Therefore the information about the new album in this interview is a bit outdated. And since Jonsu and the interviewer are wearing the same clothes as in the Christmas interview, that interview has probably been filmed on the same day, although they pretended in the Christmas interview that it was December.

Anyway, here’s my translation. I skipped the Kuorosota part because Jonsu has told the same things in other Kuorosota interviews already. But in my opinion the rest of the interview is interesting.


Indica is on a concert break at the moment. Have you decided when you will return from the break and when you will release the album?

- We will probably return from the break next year (2012). We’ve had some talks about having a couple of gigs at the end of this year, but it’s still open. And the album will come out… well, I don’t know exactly. And to be honest, I can’t tell at the moment what kind of an album it will become because so far I’ve basically just been composing. The compositions are almost finished, but the arrangements are completely unfinished and the production hasn’t even started, so the album can still change a lot.

You’ve achieved success abroad after releasing an English album. Will you continue on that path with your next album?

- Yes we will. The next album will be in English.

Will you ever again make Finnish material?

- Definitely at some point. We’ll see what we will do after the forthcoming album. We’ve worked ten years in a row without any longer breaks so at some point we will probably have a one-year break and let everyone do what they want during that year. So perhaps our drummer Laura will release a solo album then, for example.

Okay. Have you ever dreamed of a solo career?

- Well, it’s a two-sided thing. A good thing in a solo career would be the wonderful opportunity to make exactly what you wanted without negotiating with four other people… or in fact with more than four because we have a producer too. So I could make something completely different. And it’s always slower to make any decisions with a big group and of course you have to take account other people’s opinions, so it would be interesting to make a completely selfish album at some point. But when you have a band, there’s more loyalty and a better team spirit. I could consider a solo album only if the girls said that they want to have a one-year break and allow me to do whatever I want during the break. But if I decided to make a solo album at this point, it would be harsh. So I would consider it only if the others would approve it and were happy about it.

Your latest album… how do you pronounce it? Could you pronounce it for me?

- A Way Away.

So it contains Indica’s popular songs translated into English. What kind of a process it was to translate the Finnish songs into English? It must have been difficult.

- It was a painful process. I’m very happy that now we can make an album from scratch. But I made that album with Ronny Winter… I wonder which name he used on our album… I think it was Ronny Winter. So I wrote the lyrics with that Canadian poet. It was challenging because the rhythm of those songs had been made for Finnish lyrics and we had played those songs for years, so breaking the familiar pattern was a challenge. And since we were remaking those songs we felt that everything has to be made better and nothing should remain the same. It was a challenging and interesting process, but at some point also a little annoying process. So I would say that it’s easier to make songs from scratch.

How has it felt to rise from Suutarila’s band school to a world-famous band? It must feel great, but what kind of a path has it been from the band school to this big?

- What a nice expression: a world-famous band! It may be a slight exaggeration.

Maybe it is, but…

- But thank you anyway. It feels very good. It’s great. I’m very grateful that I’ve been able to live by my music and that I have a chance to have gigs and make albums. It’s great.

What is it like having gigs abroad? Does it differ much from touring in Finland? The audience must be quite different. Well, of course it depends on the place.

- Yeah. The audience varies by country. For example, we had one gig in Tokyo and it was like going to another planet. On the other hand, I think that a German audience isn’t much different from a Finnish audience. And in fact, there our venues are similar rock clubs as in Finland. Well, I don’t know. When you tour abroad… Maybe the difference is that here we sometimes play at night clubs where people are just partying. In other countries the audience has specifically come to see us because there we only play at rock clubs, so the people perhaps know our material better because they have come there to listen to our music. And I think that in France the audience was quieter because I remember that my mother was there listening to our gig and she said that if she had dropped a needle between the songs, people would have heard it. I mean that they listened very intensively. It was a very good audience. But in Finland, at bars… of course it’s because the gigs are at midnight… the audience is more restless.

What has been your best concert abroad? Was there an exceptionally good feeling in some concert?

- Perhaps the gig in Paris was one of the best gigs. It was the last concert of the tour and therefore it was more emotional for us. It was one of the dearest gigs of our own European tour. The Parisian people are wonderful and in my opinion they are good fans, very enthusiastic people. Of course on the tours with Nightwish there were wonderful gigs too and the venues were bigger. On that tour we played only at ice stadiums.

Indica has accomplished almost everything already, as I said earlier, you’ve become world-famous. Is there anything more you could accomplish? Well, maybe I am exaggerating a bit, but still. Do you still have more goals? I suppose there are many things, but…

- There are still many things. My goals are related to music and singing and other things I can affect myself. I don’t think there would be any reason to have goals like having a gig for 100,000 people. You can’t predict how big your band will become. And in the end, the biggest joy and satisfaction in this occupation comes from making music. In that sense, it doesn’t matter how popular you are.

What’s your best memory from your whole Indica career? Is there a certain memory that would be better than the others? We talked about the concert memories already, but do you have some other high point in your Indica career? I suppose there are many.

- There are many because we’ve worked together so long. At least we’ve always had a good time in Lapland. We’ve had many good cottage parties there. Well, one very important moment in the Indica career was at a cruiser gig where we had a very good team spirit and we felt that we love each other deeply. So we girls decided to get engaged to each other. It was probably the most romantic thing Indica has ever done.

Okay. That’s really great.

- There have been other highlights too. On the previous European tour we had a gig in Munich and some of us spent a couple of nights at the Sleeping Beauty’s castle in Neuschwanstein. It was a great place.

So there are many good memories in your ten-year career.

- Yes there are. It’s hard to say which one would be the best.

Maybe it’s still to come.

- I hope so. It would be sad to think that all your best moments were in the past.

Yeah. Your vice is being late, isn’t it? I’ve heard you coming late to some radio interviews.

- Yeah.

Are you getting rid of that vice already?

- I have to say that yesterday I promised to Kimmo Sainio in a radio interview on Metro FM that this week I will be everywhere in time. We made a deal that Kimmo will call me next week. We made the deal a bit more than 24 hours ago, and so far I’ve succeeded. I haven’t been late from everywhere today. Well, I was supposed to come here at three o’clock, but as I wrote in the e-mail: “I will come directly from the previous interview,” so this cannot be classified as being late.

So you’ve been everywhere in time in the past 24 hours?

- Yeah. And seriously, I promise and swear that I try to get rid of this vice completely. In the yesterday evening I decided to spend an hour at Cafe Carusel and took my calendar and wrote pros and cons, as addicts do when they are calculating the pros and cons of their vice. And I analysed it deeply, and it’s an awful vice indeed. I like people and don’t want to disappoint them.

Thank you for the visit, Jonsu.

- Thank you. It was completely my pleasure.




STILL MUCH MATERIAL IS TO BE REPOSTED...

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Oh wow! I will have to read through all of this sometime. Thanks for posting!

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INDICAN JONSUN KODISSA SOI!
Interview by www.raxa.fi 22.11.2011


http://www.raxa.fi/node/3252/3605/

Translation by Nico

Jonsu, a musician who appeared in Kuorosota, composes at her home in the shade of a palm tree. Jonsu from the band Indica lives in Espoo, but occasionally she misses Munkkiniemi (a district in Helsinki) and the sea. She doesn't miss the apartment building or the neighbours, since in this home she can make music - in peace!

What kind of colours do you have in your apartment?

Warm ones. Red, gold and brown. And of course green, because I love houseplants! I like organic materials as a balancing element to a hectic life. Right now I'm considering a rather radical solution, namely a blue bedroom. An acquaintance of mine said that the blue colour will take the earthly troubles away and bring sweet dreams with it.

Do you possess any mentality of a construction worker?

I don't think so. I guess I'm a vain singer. Construction dust seems to get your lungs clogged up and give you a headache. Therefore I deem it best to let others handle such troublesome jobs.

Is the stage decor and outlook important to you? What can't you live without on stage?

Actually the only thing that must always be there is my violin. I've had it with me at every single gig. But the atmosphere of the stage is important. I like many different places and the meanings they bear; houses with a soul. It's the same with stages. They're supposed to tell their own stories.

Do you have a home studio?

I wouldn't record an album at home, but I can do recordings at home, and I have some instruments, like a guitar and a bass, and also an amplifier. I tape a lot of songs at home, and it's a good thing that I can do so, because I occasionally have an inspiration in the middle of the night. I've noticed that when it happens it's better to get up and do something about it instead of rolling around in bed for three hours.

Do you have the necessary peace to work at home?

Usually yes, but right now the drills are making a lot of noise. I've finally fulfilled my long-time plan to go from oil heating to ground heating. Hopefully the cold winters will feel a bit warmer from now on - and the new form of heating should be cheaper, too. Now that I'm not living in an apartment building in the middle of the city, the neighbours can have their peace, too. A soundproof room dedicated to music allows me to compose and train at home without bugging others. On the other hand, sometimes the rural calm of Espoo is a bit too much and occasionally I miss living in Helsinki, for example in Munkkiniemi by the sea. But it's more difficult to find an apartment suitable for making music there. And the prices are through the roof!

What do you like most about your apartment?

My palm trees! They have beautiful, mobile leaves, and I often consider them living creatures. I talk to them, and it's like they're old friends of mine. There was a time when I dearly wanted a dog or a horse, but palm trees and other plants are better pets and companions for an artist.

What have you always dreamed of having at home?

Two things immediately come to mind. I'd like a swing suspended from the ceiling! The other must be crazier still. When we were at the Kuorosota recordings in the Linnanmдki (an amusement park in Helsinki) studio, I took a great liking to an old merry-go-round horse. I wish I could take it home! I asked if I could buy it, but it's still unclear. I hope it'll happen! I'd put it into the music room.

How important is listening to music at home?

It's very important. Sometimes I just want to enjoy the silence, in contrast to all the sensory overload. The balance between silence and noise is important. But I listen to a lot of music. My taste in music changes in seasons. Lately I've been listening to Red Hot Chili Peppers. Classical music is something I always go back to, and its takes me back to my roots and childhood. In my home it's important to have a good sound system. As a musician I can't listen to music from a laptop, since it doesn't do justice to the songs. In the winter I listen to a lot of music at home. I often sit in front of a bright light lamp and listen to something very uplifting.

Which one of your own songs would you listen to at home?

Something slow. For today's mood Helmet from Kadonnut Puutarha would fit nicely.

Where will you be this winter, aside from home?

In a little cabin in the mountains... I plan to go to Europe to finalize the new album, and for the first time I'm travelling alone. After the busy autumn with Kuorosta I felt like I had to get away for a few weeks. Away from the constant turmoil - and for a moment even from home!
It is not new, it is from Kuorosota time



Interview Autumn 2011 by Mia Malmi


NO LINK

Translation by Niko

It’s been made before Kuorosota, so it has probably been made in October 2011.

- I have some choir members already, but you can still apply to my choir through Nelonen. Many women have been interested about joining the choir, but I still need a bit more boys or men. So send me your applications!

What’s happening in Indica at the moment?

- We are making our new album now. I’ve composed music in summer and now we’ve started to test the material at the rehearsal room and plan what kind of an album we would make. We’re doing recordings in Finland and Germany. Indica will probably be on the concert break during Kuorosota, so we’ll have the next gigs in the beginning of next year (2012) or at the end of this year. The new album will be released next year.

Are you already bored with touring in your homeland?

- Not at all. It’s always wonderful to tour in Finland. Our most faithful and longtime fans are in Finland, so we’re definitely not going to forget Finland.

Is it easier for you to write songs in Finnish than in English?

- Well, I started with Finnish. Both languages have good and bad sides. But although the next album will be in English, I definitely don’t think that I would continue this way the rest of my life. I will definitely make Finnish music at some point, either with Indica or with some other people.

Do you dream of a solo career or something?

- I don’t have such plans, but Indica has a ten-year anniversary this year and we’ve planned to have a one-year break at some point. Then every one of us can see what other things we could do in our lives.

What else are you going to do in your life?

- I don’t know. We’ll see. But we’ve had very intensive ten years…

How old are you now?

- I’m 27.

Have you considered founding a family at some point, or something like that?

- It would certainly be nice to have kids and a family at some point, but not right now.

You still have time for that, about ten years.

- Yeah. Fortunately it’s nowadays possible to have kids at a bit older age. So I don’t have to worry about it this year and probably not next year either.


Interview and filming: Mia Malmi
Editing: Petri Voutilainen

WWF and the Like Activities of Indica Ladies

reposted posts from the former forum

Wishmaster
Posted 08 May 2012 - 11:15


http://wwf.fi/paivatyokerays/

Scroll down a bit and you'll see Heini in a diving suit
I think it says by the picture that if you send mail to the address written there they'll send a poster-size version...

Niko
Posted 08 May 2012 - 12:29


Thank you for the link. The posters are sent only to Finnish schools that participate in WWF Finland's campaign to collect money for protecting seas, but you can download this PowerPoint file wwf.fi/mediabank/2251.ppt??? which includes a higher resolution photo of Heini in that diving suit.

SEVERUS: I FAILED TO GIVE A WORKING LINK. SORRY

By the way, the text says that "Heini from Indica is worried about the future of (marine) species".


Nico
Posted 20 May 2012 - 04:19


It seems that Jonsu has joined Sharewood http://sharewood.org/alku.php , a "responsible social media" that enables people to contribute money for good causes for free (the money comes from advertising). The following interview in Finnish can be found here. http://sharewood.org/info_news.php?id=1254&cause_id=0



"The idea behind Sharewood is really good, because everyone can participate in the charity regardless of personal wealth. Sharewood has a positive feeling of doing things together, even if some of the subjects are quite serious. There's a lot of interesting information on the site. It seems that pretty much everyone I know would like to do something to help, yet they don't where and how to begin. Therefore it's good that it's so easy to join Sharewood: everybody can do charity in their own way, for example on their computer or by finding suitable voluntary work."

Jonsu picked Animalia
http://www.animalia.fi/en/animalia-brief
(an organization dedicated to furthering animal rights) as her beneficiary.

"Animalia defends those who can't defend themselves. Animalia is a responsible organization that fights for important things."

Jonsu does her part in protecting animals every day by aiming for as ethical consumption as possible.

"I avoid eating meat and using dairy products. When I do either, I try to buy organic products. If I see animal abuse around me, I try to something about it. Last time I was in Tallinn my friends invited me to dinner in a restaurant that had a very small fish tank with two sharks and hardly any movement space at all. Afterwards I wrote to the restaurant, saying that I'd be happy to recommend the place to people and take my friends there, but that as long as the fish tank remained it wasn't going to happen. A single complaint doesn't necessarily change anything, but I believe that the greater the number of people paying attention to redressing grievances, the more likely a change is to happen. I believe that increasing awareness is key in preventing cruelty to animals. When people see how cruelly certain products are manufactured, buying them becomes harder."

The singer is happy to participate in the kind of charity that she believes in.

"I've got to participate in some charity events through music and I've supported a couple of organizations, but in the future I hope to work more actively and do more concrete things for charity. Human rights are another matter that I'd like to work with. I believe that welfare of self is essential to acting ethically towards others."

However, criticality towards organizations has grown with age.

"When I was young I believed that the word 'charity' made an organization virtually sacred and just. These days I always try to find out about the methods and concrete actions taken by an organization before I commit myself to it."

Johanna Salomaa, what does the world need?

"Hope, love and belief in the fact that little things matter and everyone can make a change. I've often come across the idea that one shouldn't do anything, since the world is a miserable place anyway and unless one is a paragon philanthropist, it's better not to act sanctimonious i.e. it's best to do nothing. I don't believe in that at all. One knows best for oneself what kind of changes or contributions one is prepared to make at any given moment, and can only do one's best. One person may consider buying organic milk instead of normal milk an act of preventing cruelty to animals, while another person skips a meal of meat and yet another makes sure never to step on a single ant. Even a baby step towards a good direction is an important and great step. Change is gradual."



Indica Has Baby News

http://www.voice.fi/viihde/indica-yhtye ... ia/1/43083]

Translation by Niko


Indica has also been making something other than music during the recording break.

Indica vanished from the media a couple of years ago. The band that went on a recording break has been in publicity only when the singer Jonsu visited Kuorosota last year. Voice surprised Jonsu by calling her and asked what the band is doing.



- We are at the moment, with the band and the baby, choosing the photographer of the promo photos for the new album, tells Jonsu.

Choosing the photographer usually means that the album is about to be ready?

- That’s true. The new album is pretty much ready, confirms Jonsu and tells that it will be released in March.

You said something about a baby?

- Our bassist Heini had a baby a few weeks ago and I became the baby’s godmother. So we’ve been making also something other than the album, tells Jonsu laughing.


RockStar Magazine July 2010 (Switzerland)

Here you can see (and read in German - click and you'll be able to see the inner pages of the magazine)RockStar Magazine for July 2010 (Switzerland)

http://www.issuu.com/rckstr/docs/rs70

But I cannot save it to my computer - only by printscreen (quality is not so good...)

http://i.imgur.com/ibUo1.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/9StH9.png

http://i.imgur.com/kgjxF.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/hfxKN.png)

translation by Indicana Jones

I had to leave out two or three sentences because I had no idea how to translate them.


Drinki Drinki in Helsinki

Rockstar accompanies the elflike Indicas through their hometown and drinks what's being served.

The last time Finnland entered the musical world stage, it did so with flamebreathing rubber beasts screaming "Hard! Rock! Hallelujah!" to the shock of bosnian housewifes. As amusing as it was during those ten minutes, it would not remain the only entry into the great history book of pop. And so, now the goth-pop girls from Indica emerge from the north. The five ladys have already been cerified gold and platimum several times in their home country and now they have a try with world domination with their new album "A Way Away"

Rockstar, specialist magazine for world domination, traveled to Finnland via dog sled for two days to keep an eye on Indica during the promotour for their new album.

Wednesday, June 2nd.

03:00 P.M: Somewhere in southern Helsinki at radio station Aalto: nice wheather outside, radio interview with frontwoman Jonsu inside. We can't summarize the conversation. All we know after our basic Finnish course is that the sentence "What's the way to the library?" wasn't part of it.

04:00 P.M: We leave for the shopping mall Stockmann. Along the way, Jonsu tells us that you don't really get to know anything relevant about the city during the Helsinki bustour for 35 Euros. Angrily, we bite our fist.

04:30 P.M: Inside the basement of the shopping mall is the media department where Indica is about to play an acoustic gig. But before that the girls need to satisfy their munchies for sweets. The search for the fix of sugar leads us directly into the fan crowd.

05:30 P.M: A little nervous Indica enters the stage. Their backliners forgot the drums of drummer Laura in the bandroom. After three songs from the new album with a drumless drummer the missing equipment arrives. After the show the fans come to get their autographs. We already got ours.

06:30 P.M: Indica inside the shopping mall: appearently a popular photo motif. There is to be a shooting as soon as the girls got out their autograph pens. With that, the promo is done for today and we get into our studys of finnish alcohol.

Thursday, June 3rd

06:30 A.M: Holy Mackarel! The buzzer wakes us, while it's already bright outside for some time. Tricky Finnland: This time of the year it barely gets dark and the sun is at its zenith at 5 o' clock.

08:00 A.M: When Indica doesn't give interviews to radio stations, they do so for TV stations. There to keep the appointment are Jonsu and bassist Heini, who is as pretty as her name is stupid and thus made for moving pictures. The talkmaster doesn't allow us to take photos.

09:00 AM: Rock'n'Roll lifestyle: Heini already has to say good-bye since she has to walk her dog. Jonsu offers us to accompany her to her hair appointment. We blush and reject giggling. Our relationship isn't that far yet.

05:00 P.M: during the second radio interview nobody wants to know the way to the library either. We're starting to doubt the usefulness of our Finnish course.

04:30 PM: On the terrace in front of the club "On the Rocks" Indica introduce us to the best friend of the Finnish summer. Lonkero. This mixture of Gin and Grapefruit lemonade is being emptied into the throat by the liter on hot days. On this occasion we also learn the most important Finnish word: "Library". No, joke. "Cheers", naturally. Translated: "Kippis".

05:00 PM: Eating ice cream in the park. We feel like during our first date. Indica rave off the tours with Nightwish and Pain. And should you ever buy Mint ice cream in Finnland: Only the sort with the penguin on the packaging. All others aren't the original and are being made of the spit of dead dogs.

08:00 PM: Big in Helsinki! Directly after the soundcheck for the showcase later this evening the band is asked to do another photo shooting and surprised with a giant poster. The attack of 20 meter Indicas promotes the release of their new album.

10:00 PM: During the one hour showcase many fans hear their heroines in English language for the first time. Nevertheless they are enchanted. After the show we go to the backstage party. Waving handkarchiefs we say goodbye and promise to be there at the first CH appointment of the girls. In the front row. Mint ice cream in one and plush heart in the other hand


Interview in German (rcnmagazin.de)

http://www.rcnmagazin.de/go/rcn/_dbe,ne ... 6444.xhtml

Indica interview 2.6.2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShwOAWk- ... e=youtu.be

Translation by Nico

I=interviewer, H=Heini, J=Jonsu


I: Good morning.

H&J: Morning.

I: Today the long-awaited

H: and long in making

I: album was released. How long did you work on it?

H&J: A year and a half.

J: The album was made all over the place: in Germany, Finland, New York and London. We thought we'd never finish it, so it was great to finally get it done.

H: And it's great that it's being released, since that means that we can't change it anymore. It's finally out.

I: So you were experiencing some serious lack of faith somewhere down the road?

H: Well, not really. It just always felt like there was something to improve, or change. This was the first time we weren't on a schedule, due to not having a record label, so there was no one to put their foot down about deadlines.

J: We made and paid for the master record all by ourselves, which drained the company's accounts. Everyone wanted to make the perfect album to bring as much happiness and love into the world as possible.

I: So you did it at your own risk: there was no advance from a big record label, and you had to believe in your own work?

H: We adamantly wanted to have no schedules or limits given by a record label. We wanted to do things the way it felt good for us.

J: There was no-one to tell us not to go to London to record the orchestral parts and force us to do them here - not that there aren't very good orchestras here, too. But yeah, we started to "sell" our album and made the deal with a German record label only after the master record was completely finished.

I: Why Germany?

J: If you want to go to Europe, I find the rational choices to be UK and Germany.

I: You were well received there, weren't you?

H: Yes, absolutely! The record label has been awesome.

I: They have other Finnish bands, too: Nightwish, Amorphis,

H&J: Yeah.

I: Sonata Arctica.

H: All of them being heavy metal bands.

I: So how did you come to sign a contract with Nuclear Blast?

J: Actually they took an interest in us when we toured Europe with Nightwish before. They saw some gigs of ours, and when we finished the album we presented it to them. When we saw their conviction for the music - very similar to ours - we knew we wanted to work with them.

I: Did they have any wishes or requirements about how Indica should be when the album is released in Europe? Did you need to change something?

J: Actually, no. I guess they believed that we as a band have our thing.

H: We had a long background. They'd already seen what we were and what we'd done.

J: Their one wish was for us to never have a holiday again and to try to make do with 5 hours of nightly sleep.

I: So they're looking for dedication?

J: Actually that has always been the attitude of the band. This is a way of life for us.

H: But in comparison to Finnish record labels they sure like to ask more dedication of us. At least in our experience in Finland the requirements are not so high. But this suits us very nicely.

J: If you're doing promotional work in Finland, you can cut it down to 2 weeks. In Europe you could be touring for years and still fail to scour all the places.

I: The album comes out 25th of this month in the rest of Europe, and today in Finland.

J: And also in Australia, I just heard. I hope we'll have a tour there.

I: What does it mean in practise? What sort of promotional tours and appearances are in order?

J: Next weekend we'll go to Rock am Ring - that's probably the biggest festival in Europe. Today we'll give an acoustic gig at Stockmann for all ages, and tomorrow there will be the release party at On the Rocks. But the European tour begins next fall.

I: Will it be big?

J: I'm pretty sure it'll cover most of Europe. I know some of the dates already, and it seems to take a lot of our autumn.

I: Your fans have sent us some questions regarding this. Will Europe take you permanently away from Finland, and will you still play the Finnish songs in Finland?

H: This is a tough one. Tomorrow at the release party we'll obviously play the English songs, but in general I think we'll play Finnish material in Finland.

J: I think we may play some songs in English. It'll be something exotic for the foreign fans who have already been coming to Finland, to be able to hear the band in Finnish.

I: So the answer is you'll do both?

J: Probably yes. Abroad we'll play in English, apart from the occasional Finnish song. We most certainly don't plan to abandon Finland. This is the place our first fans stem from, and the very stalwart of our whole career. Sometimes reporters have asked if the new album is directed solely for the foreign market, and I've said not by any means. In any case, at the moment the Finnish audience is our biggest, most devoted and most loved audience.

I: Thanks for the visit and good luck with the new album.

H&J: Thanks.



SOME STUFF STILL WAITS FOR REPOSTING...

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PostPosted: Tue 29. Jan 2013, 19:52 
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I checked the problematic links of my translations.

Found/Fixed links:

Interview Autumn 2011 by Mia Malmi
http://dev.metrolive.fi/jutut/artikkeli ... a-aidiksi/ (video)

WWF and the Like Activities of Indica Ladies
http://wwf.fi/mediabank/2251.ppt

These videos are geoblocked:

A Four-Star Dinner
http://arkisto.ruutu.fi/video?vt=video_ ... vid=396814 (Sikke's episode)
http://arkisto.ruutu.fi/video?vt=video_ ... vid=396806 (Jari's episode)
http://arkisto.ruutu.fi/video?vt=video_ ... vid=396818 (Jone's episode)

These links are dead:

Television Interview With Jonsu And Heini On Yle Aamu-TV In June 3, 2010
http://areena.yle.fi/video/1033602

A Short Interview in Which Jonsu and Heini Talk About Kersantti Karoliina
http://www.voice.fi/index.php?option=co ... =3&cid=277

Documentary of Valokeilojen Vampyyri
http://www.voice.fi/index.php?option=co ... o&cid=3840


EDIT: I found the interview by Mia Malmi

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PostPosted: Wed 30. Jan 2013, 11:36 
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The same page that includes the video interview by Mia Malmi includes also a written interview that was released on the 5th of September 2011. The website is no longer maintained, but the interviews are still there below the error messages. The written interview includes a little piece of information that was new to me, so here's the translation:


Jonsu from Indica: I Don't Want to Be a Mother Yet!

The musician who participates Kuorosota wants to create a career abroad.

Jonsu from Indica, aka Johanna Salomaa, will lead the choir of her hometown Espoo in Kuorosota that begins on Nelonen in October. Half of the group is already chosen and the rest will have an audition within a couple of weeks. Jonsu hopes to get more boys to the choir, but women are welcome too.
- The register isn’t so important. It’s the attitude that matters, hints Jonsu.

Jonsu lists the abilities required to get into the choir:
1. Some voice.
2. Love towards music.
3. Will.
4. A good attitude.

Indica is on a concert break until next spring. Before that the band toured mainly in Finland and Europe. Jonsu also dreams of an Australian tour, but first the band would need a foothold in the music markets of the kangaroo country.
- Our English album has been released there. Everyone praises the country and its good atmosphere. I’d like to get a chance to experience it, she dreams.

The singer who is silent about her love life admits that she would like to have a family at some point in the future. She is engaged to Jesse Hietanen, the son of the actress Anne Pohtamo. At least this long concert break isn’t caused by a child.
- It would be wonderful to have children at some point, but this may not be the right time. Fortunately it’s nowadays possible to have kids in a bit older age. So, it’s not going to happen this year and probably not next year either, thinks the 27 years old musician.

The original text: Mia Malmi

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PostPosted: Wed 30. Jan 2013, 12:43 
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Niko, thanks for translation! I cannot watch the video, though. Probably, it's geoblocked :(

Will anybody be so kind to translate this? (interview is found by Telajel) It seems, it hasn't been translated yet...

http://www.katsomo.fi/?progId=23699

I can watch this vid, but I cannot grab from the website...

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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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PostPosted: Wed 30. Jan 2013, 16:05 
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Severus wrote:
http://www.katsomo.fi/?progId=23699


A bit iffy at times, but here goes.


I: That was Valokeilojen Vampyyri by Indica, from the compilation album that was released yesterday. Good morning, Jonsu and Heini.

J&H: Good morning!

I: Last week Indica had its 8th birthday.

J: Yeah.

I: Have the years gone by fast?

J: They always do, I guess.

H: Really fast.

J: I've heard that the older you grow, the faster they'll go.

I: Be warned: that's actually the way it goes. Your compilation album is called Pahinta Tänään*. Is there a joke here somewhere? I think that's a pretty funny name for a compilation album.

J: We made it with the twinkle of humor in our eyes.

H: And we had some disputes over whether or not to release a compilation album. Finally someone said let's do it, but at least we'll call it that.

J: The suggestion to do this came from the record label. We sat down for a coffee, listed the pros and cons, and finally decided to do it.

I: What were the cons?

H: Mostly it was the timing. We thought maybe we should make a new album first. In the end we felt like this might be a good intermission (J: ending) for an era.

J: There was also the fact that one of my favorite songs, Ruusupensaat, didn't quite make it to the last album. We also had some new songs we wanted to out. This was a good way to do that.

I: It sounds like you are opposed to compilations in general. Are there too many compilation albums in the world?

J: For many bands the mandatory compilation is written down in the recording contract. We tried to think of ways to harness our compilation into the service of our fans. For new listeners who may not have been Indica listeners since the beginning it's also very good, because it has something old, something new and all the singles from between. The average listener often likes to listen to the radio hits and singles. It's a good way to familiarize oneself with a new band.

I: The song that we just heard, Valokeilojen Vampyyri, is actually a very old song. You made it when you were 15. How come it took so long to get it recorded?

H: It was the result of a lot of bullying. The band put the pressure on her and she finally gave in, with tears in her eyes.

J: We had a pretty big argument about it.

H: Yes, we did.

J: Imagine reading your diary from when you were 15: "oh my god, did I write this? I've changed so much; this is incredibly stupid stuff." I think it's mostly the lyrics that tell of a person's change - at least that goes for me - and thus it's the lyricists that are especially critical to their own work after a long time.

I: Are there dumb lyrics?

J: No! The girls asked me if I take myself too seriously, and they were definitely correct.

I: You've been working closely together for 8 years now. You see each other around 300 days per year.

J: Lucky us!

H: Indeed.

I: Has that ever gotten to your nerves?

H: Yes, probably many times over the years. We've gone through all kinds of phases. It's kind of like a marriage, with its good and bad moments.

J: I'd say that love and friendship grows deeper the longer you know someone. And every time we spend our biannual two-week separation holidays I find myself missing everybody terribly.

H: Those two weeks always feel very weird. We try to make zero contact with each other during those times.

I: One would think that you'd only want to take a breather and enjoy the peace.

H: That's what usually happens at first, but in the end that's not how we feel.

J: We usually sleep in the same room. During our whole career and hundreds of gigs, we've only twice decided to take separate rooms for everyone, just to try it out. We ended up partying in the hallway, so that wasn't such a good idea.

I: Out of your 8-year career, is there a moment that really stands out?

J: Release parties are always loved by everyone, because it always signifies the end of a long and arduous process. And it's followed by gigs and other lovely things. Can you think of anything, Heini?

H: No, not really.

J: There are so many great moments. Especially now that we're releasing a compilation I feel deep appreciation for the people, the fans, who've been with us for the duration of our whole career.

I: It's often thought that the life of a musician is full of glamor and great things. In contrast, what's been the worst thing over the years?

H: In Finland there - thank god - isn't too much reverence for publicity and glamor.

H: When we were touring Europe with Nightwish and visited a country we'd never visited before, the reverence of the fans was something different altogether. It's a good thing that in Finland we can be at peace despite the fame.

I: There's a good future goal for you: to try to reach that level.

H: At least for me it's definitely a pro to be mostly left alone, so I don't know about that.

H: There was this one instance (in Finland) when I was shopping with a friend. We argued who'd pay, and I said that I've no want for small change. The next edition of a certain Finnish yellow press publication announced that Heini from Indica likes to boast about her riches.**

I: That's funny! Thanks for coming to you both. Have a very nice autumn. I hear there's going to be a release party later this week.

J: Yes. Thank you.

*: I'm pretty sure its finer points have been debated somewhere before, but a fair translation for Pahinta Tänään could be The Worst Thing Today.

**: I'm pretty sure the magazine actually mentioned Jenny instead of Heini; I remember reading this piece of "news" years ago.

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PostPosted: Thu 31. Jan 2013, 16:44 
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There will be a global band competition later this year organized by Hard Rock. Jonsu will be among the judges of the Finnish tryouts. Here's what she had to say about it.


J: This will be very interesting. I'm eagerly looking forward to seeing what bands will be competing. Let's hope we'll find a great representative from Finland to win the whole contest.

Jonsu adds that there are a lot of fresh, skilled musicians in Finland. The latest find of hers is Aino Venna.

J: I heard one of her songs, like, on the background of the teletext and instantly fell for it. What is this, such a great new Finnish artist! I believe that Finland has good chances in the international final. We have so many great musicians.

The contestants for the Finnish qualifiers will be chosen through a Facebook-based public vote (8 in total) and an extra wildcard band. Each one will get 20 minutes of stage time.

J: I find that to be a good thing, because I have experience of the nervousness of the first song, the monitors not working or everything simply going to hell. 20 minutes is enough time to see what kind of potential a band really has.

The Finnish qualifiers will be held on four consecutive Mondays at the Hard Rock Café in Helsinki, starting 18th March. The Finnish final will be held 15th April.

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PostPosted: Sat 2. Feb 2013, 14:39 
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Nico, thanks a lot! And thanks once again!

Mesta.net Interview with Jonsu
Indicaa seurataan Rovaniemeltä Helsinkiin
10.11.2011


http://www.mesta.net/haastattelut/?aid=395

translation by Nico


http://www.mesta.net/haastattelut/?aid=395 said:

Ikuinen Virta brought you success. What things surprised you?

-The biggest surprise in the beginning was to have some strange people at the gigs instead of just cloase family and friends. Over time the number of strangers just kept growing in an indecipherable way.

The gigs have taken you around Finland. At which part of Finland can you find the most boisterous Indica fans?

-I think you'll find the rowdiest crowd in the region of Ostrobothnia. But the best fans follow us from Rovaniemi to Helsinki. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=rova ... ls&t=m&z=6


Onto current events... Was it easy or hard to make Tuuliset Tienoot?

-It was extremely interesting and challenging. Not too easy nor too hard.

Your new album was the 18th most sold album at its release week. Was that a disappointment?

-The position was the same as that of our debut album Ikuinen Virta. No surprises there.


I hear you starting songwriting before you went to school. Do you still have the songs you made as a child?


-Yes, to an extent. I try to save all "compositions" in some form.

Do you constantly get ideas for new songs? How many do you even write down?

-New ideas are born all the time, but few of them end up being whole songs. Which is a good thing.

Do you ever fear that the creativity to write music and lyrics will run out?

-No. The world is full of inspirational people, events, moments and art. There are so many ways to kindle one's creativity, that there's always a way out of the dead end of thoughts.

How visually do you see Indica's music? When you write the music and the lyrics, do you see the song as a motion picture?

-Sometimes.

Is the main character in your songs female?

-Mostly I don't even think about her gender. I guess she could be a man or a woman, sometimes even an animal.

What kind of situation would you like to find yourself in as a musician ten years from now?

-I coudln't say. Right now the status quo feels good, but you never know what kind of barn you'll be singing in at that time.


Now tell people how to best enjoy the darkest time of the year?


-I just met an Austrian friend of mine, who was going to Lapland for the weekend just to see the darkness. So I guess you could learn to enjoy darkness itself. After a busy day, I usually relax best in quiet and dark conditions. And if it gets too gloomy you can always use candles to light up the night.


Interview by Telajel

I did an interview with Jonsu. Here are questions and answers:

1.Indica were in Romania, how it was?

Yes, we had really good time there and we hope to go there again soon!

2.When you were on ,,a way away'' tour you often must get up at 3 o'clock and go very far without any breakfast. How it was?

We were travelling by bus with a small kitchen in it so we were not starving

3.Are you got nervous when you going on stage?

Sometimes

4.Have you ever quarrelled with the girls?

Yes, of course, but we love each others so itґs not so serious.

5.All your fans are asking: in what language will be next album?

English, but we might publish a Finnish single before it.


6.How do fans react when they see you on the street?


They have always been very polite and nice!


7.What's indica girls hobby? Painting? Write poems?


I love starting new things and hobbies all the time. Consistensy is a bigger challenge for me. So I think music has been one of the only things that I have never stopped and that is a regular part of my life.

Polish vershion on http://www.jonsu-indicaband.blogspot.com

Interview 4.8.2012
Sotkamo sykkii elävää musiikkia


http://www.kainuunsanomat.fi/Kainuu/119 ... ikkia.html

translation by Nico

For background, it is mentioned that Ewo Pohjola is one of the organizers of the event. I will only translate the short section pertinent to Indica.

http://www.kainuunsanomat.fi/Kainuu/119 ... ikkia.html said:
The second band of the evening was Indica with their only Finnish festival gig of this summer.

The band is making a new album in Hamburg, Germany. Their soloist summed up her feelings after the gig.

"It's nice to be on a gig. Ewo is our manager, so we couldn't stay away from here", says Jonsu, or Johanna Salomaa.

The uneventful gig summer is basically a matter of organization, according to Jonsu. Moving between Finland and Germany would be difficult.

"Now we're going to the sauna, have a glass of white wine and then we're going to see some gigs", she sheds light on their plans for the rest of the evening.

interview in the Sotkamo-lehti newspaper 2012

Important posts from the topic Gigs 2012 from the former forum

Niko
Posted 07 August 2012 - 16:32



Hattivatti (user of former forum Finnish section) was referring to an interview in the Sotkamo-lehti newspaper. The issue is online, but you can watch only the front page for free http://www.lehtiluukku.fi/pub?id=20383 . (Check it out to see the photo of Jonsu). I haven't bought the issue, but apparently Jonsu has said in the interview that the new album won't be released until 2013.

Nico
Posted 07 August 2012 - 22:57


Bought the paper, made a rather hasty and imprecise translation. So sorry for bad English and other mistakes. Every quote is from Jonsu.

Indica trusts in good songs

The band, Indica, that plays melodic and melancholic pop-rock gave their first performance in over a year last Friday.

In Sotkamon Syke some of their old, Finnish hits were heard. The last time they'd performed in Finnish was in January 2011.

The band has focused on composing and recording their new album during the break. The upcoming album will be their second one in English.

"For once we wanted to make an album in peace, and thus we decided against doing gigs", Indica's singer Jonsu or Johanna Salomaa said before their performance last Friday.

Every musician has their own way of composing music, and she is no exception.

"I don't need any particular state of emotion to start composing. Usually I just start playing the piano and listen to what it wants to say. When you listen to a single note from the piano, you'll find it full of emotions."

The work on the album has been done in Hamburg under the watchful eye of the German Roland Spremberg.

"The upcoming album is more song-based and intimate than before."

Their previous album that came out in 2010, A Way Away, was produced by Tuomas Holopainen, the composer of Nightwish.

"Tuomas left a strong mark on the last album with the orchestral parts. Now everything isn't so massive anymore."

The recordings of the new album are almost finished. Only the last vocals remain unrecorded.

"Some of the vocals were recorded in June. In July I took a month-long break from the album-making by touring Europe. I'll go back to Hamburg in a couple of weeks to finish the vocal recordings."

Salomaa says that one hears things differently in the studio after a little break. The same apparently also goes for playing Finnish songs.

"You kind of find the songs anew and understand what's important about them. It's like re-reading a book that you read as a child, and understanding what it was always about."

Indica started in 2001. During their 11-year career, the band's composition has not changed.

"Friendship is an important ppart of that. At this point it's something of an unwritten rule that nobody's going to get kicked out, even if they act up for half a year in a row. Thus far nobody's wanted to leave."

However, on Friday's gig a substitute was necessary.

"It seems that our bass player Heini has had some time for other things than playing the bass, and now there's a tiny bass player on the way."

Help was found from a surprising place.

"We remembered this bass player guy, Jaakko, from our gymnasium times. He always looked like he knew what he was doing with the instrument. I asked him to help us with the gig on Facebook."

The upcoming album is Indica's second one released under Nuclear Blast. Nuclear Blast is the biggest metal record label in Europe. Salomaa doesn't see a problem, although Indica doesn't really fit Nuclear Blast's usual mold.

"Of all our options, they seemed to be the most motivated ones to invest in us. Instead of believing in a genre, they believe in good music. They've given us free rein in our album-making."

"They would've wanted to release the album last year. But then we had a really good discussion with them about how the only thing that really mattered is that ultimately they'd have a good album in their hands."

The new album won't be released before 2013.

"Nobody believes that anymore, though, since last year I said that the recordings are almost done."





Still some sfuff is to reposted...

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 Post subject: Re: Media
PostPosted: Sat 2. Feb 2013, 14:44 
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How do you even repost all this stuff? Did you backup the whole database of the old forum or what? :D

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PostPosted: Sun 3. Feb 2013, 14:10 
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@ INDICaNa JoNEsU

when the attack at the former forum began, I downloaded nearly topics of the English section, and some from the Finnish.]


Indica / Jonsu at the Covers of Different Magazines


Zillo Juli-August 2010

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/19 ... 3e44b.jpg/

Posts concerning it from the former forum:

Severus
Posted 17 July 2010 - 21:26


this is what I have seen today on internet: the cover of Zillo. The word "Indica" here is 3 times. There is some song (which?) something about the band (what?) and a poster witn Indica. Does anybody know what is inside this magazine? Besides, it's great, it is honour for any musician to be mentioned in Zillo

Wishmaster
Posted 17 July 2010 - 21:51


I want poster!!!

Andy
Posted 18 July 2010 - 18:49


Severus, on 17 July 2010 - 21:26, said:
this is what I have seen today on internet: the cover of Zillo. The word "Indica" here is 3 times. There is some song (which?) something about the band (what?) and a poster witn Indica. Does anybody know what is inside this magazine? Besides, it's great, it is honour for any musician to be mentioned in Zillo


It contains an article about the Band aswell as a Poster of Jonsu and the Song " Island of Lights" ^^; Like they say on the Homepage, the following issues will dig deeper into the story of Indica

If you click on "Leseproben" you can find a piece of the article. Guess there´s a Copyright to it so I won´t post the artcile here. Just give it to google translator

Yours Truly Andy



Slam nr.50


http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/20 ... racki.jpg/

No quite sure that our Indica is meant...

Back to Black March-April 2011

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/83 ... 251000.jpg

http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/9889 ... 257000.jpg

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/8703/1 ... 302000.jpg

Related post from the former forum:

Severus
Posted 19 March 2011 - 13:49


Look, what I have bought in my town! I was shocked when I saw it!

It is a Ukrainian magazine for teenagers. I understand that is not Orkus or Zillo , but still it is nice to see Indica here. And it is good for the promotion of the band - the readers of the magazine will know about Indica now.

They call Jonsu Johanna and they confused Sirkku and Jenny on the picture

Top 10 in the corner has nothing to do with the band - it is music which the readers of the magazine like.

NOTE: there is the same magazine Black in Black in Polish (the same cover, article, even the same mistake - Sirkku instead of Jenny and vice versa.


XAVER

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/94 ... 693321.jpg


Gothic N.68, 2010

http://i.imgur.com/cuvSu.jpg


The coverart is the same with one of compilation albums, where Indica's song As If is included

http://a1.ec-images.myspacecdn.com/imag ... 8c18/l.jpg


Piranha

http://i.imgur.com/8hcmb.jpg

Related post from the former forum:

Severus
Posted 29 June 2012 - 13:10


not new, but I just found the cover of this magazine

Note the inscription about Finnish girls

Rytmi 2/2009

http://i.imgur.com/2tgrO.jpg

Rumba (various numbers)

http://i.imgur.com/Z2OYd.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/4BNZL.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/CLVXR.jpg

Rumba magazine with Indica girls and Ville Akseli Juurikkala on the cover
http://img814.imageshack.us/img814/3415/23423x.jpg

here it is:
http://www.lehtiluukku.fi/pub?id=213 (click there on the image and get a big size)

Discussion with Ville Akseli Juurikkala at FB:
http://i.imgur.com/9odpaW3.jpg
Photo by Jarkko Tiitinen


Russian Magazine Dark City N 57, 2010 (July-August)

Related post from the former forum:

Severus
Posted 04 November 2012 - 18:28


Indica Poster (actually, 1/4 of the poster)i n Russian magazine Dark City N 57, 2010 (July-August)

http://i.imgur.com/a5kIT.jpg

from here - http://hard-life.ru/page/226/

Jonsu is in a very good company - Floor!

Did they foresee that Floor will join NW? :D

EDIT: this is this poster - big (1082x1488 http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/441/13532.jpg/

RockStar Magazine July 2010 (Switzerland) - http://www.issuu.com/rckstr/docs/rs70 and Orkus http://i.imgur.com/riZBJlW.jpg were already mentioned earlier in this thread

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PostPosted: Sun 10. Mar 2013, 15:06 
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THERE WAS A TOPIC "iNTERVIEWS" AT THE FORMER FORUM (BESIDES THE TOPIC "MEDIA"). SO I DECIDED TO RESTORE THE STUFF FROM THIS TOPIC HERE IN THIS THREAD

Interviews!
Indica Forum -> Indica -> Interviews!


swanheart
Posted 31 October 2008 - 15:41


Well, I suppose that with the new album "Valoissa", there must be many new Indica interviews in the Finnish media: press, the internet, TV ...


This is mainly a thread for those caritative Finnish souls who may want to translate their Indica interviews or articles, because we non-Finnish-speakers know virtually nothing about how Finland is receiving the new album "Valoissa", I mean, does Indica appear on the radio? On TV? I saw that at least they appeared in Jackpot, although the YouTube link for that doesn't work anymore...


Come on guys, the forum seems a bit dead these days!!

Oh and I edit to say THIS IS HALLOWEEN!!

arij
Posted 02 November 2008 - 23:42


You can find the whole jackpot program here http://nettitv.mtv3....3viihde/jackpot DEAD LINK and then select 4.10.2008 jackpot

ME: MOST PROBABLY THIS VIDEO IS A PART OF THIS PROGRAMME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2jyBFI0PmU

swanheart
Posted 03 November 2008 - 00:41


arij, on 2.11.2008, 23:42, said:
You can find the whole jackpot program here and then select 4.10.2008 jackpot


hey thanks!

wow what do Jonsu and Heini say that the whole family is like "oh noo!" ??

nightcat114
Posted 03 November 2008 - 18:02


sorta off topic, I still want to hear the acoustic version of 'ikuinen virta' that they did there.

Wizzu
Posted 03 November 2008 - 18:42


swanheart, on 3.11.2008, 00:41, said:
wow what do Jonsu and Heini say that the whole family is like "oh noo!" ??


They are describing what the family's task is (ie. learning the lyrics for the two albums).

nightcat114, on 3.11.2008, 18:02, said:
sorta off topic, I still want to hear the acoustic version of 'ikuinen virta' that they did there.


They didn't do an acoustic version of Ikuinen virta in that program, they performed Valoissa.

Unless you're referring to the short clip that they did which they stopped mid-verse for the task?

swanheart
Posted 03 November 2008 - 22:35


hi guys, I've been desperately trying to translate the following interview with internet's automatic translators, and they're COMPLETELY USELESS!!

So I'd like to ask someone to translate it...Of course, I know it's a lot of text so it would be OK if someone could translate only the "track by track" part or something like that, I know it's quite a lot..but I'm so interested in what they say!

well, thanks if someine can do it, I'd be eternally grateful, and I bet other non-Finnish
speakers would be as well!

This is it:

http://www.korroosio...iews.php?id=205 DEAD LINK

Wizzu
Posted 03 November 2008 - 22:39


swanheart, on 3.11.2008, 22:35, said:
http://www.korroosio...iews.php?id=205 DEAD LINK


That's one of the better if not the best textual Indica interview out there.. Supposedly the talk session lasted some 2 hours or something. The best person to translate it might be Akiman from here in the forum, since he was the one who wrote it. But I'm not sure if he comes by often or pays any attention to the English side.

Not much of a real help here, sorry.

swanheart
Posted 03 November 2008 - 23:09


Wizzu, on 3.11.2008, 22:39, said:
That's one of the better if not the best textual Indica interview out there.. Supposedly the talk session lasted some 2 hours or something. The best person to translate it might be Akiman from here in the forum, since he was the one who wrote it. But I'm not sure if he comes by often or pays any attention to the English side.


Not much of a real help here, sorry.

yeah, just by taking a look I got the impression that it was a wonderful, well-thought and interesting interview, that's why I want the translation so badly!

Laba
Posted 04 November 2008 - 23:34


It is a shame the interview is so long that it would take ages to translate it... And maybe we would need a permission from Akiman as well. But that is a really brilliant interview. I tried to translate some of the track by track part and realized it is quite a task to do. Anyway here are the comments of the first three tracks (all comments are Jonsu's) :

Jonsu's Comments on Valoissa Tracks

ELÄ

In addition to its exotic intro and little rhythm oddities this song is quite heavy and fast album starter and probably our heaviest song ever. If you want to hear some exciting detail, there is also a human instrument, not counting vocals. Everyone can figure out themselves what I mean. The song has an eastern feeling and quite fine harmony vocals, even shouts. Purely a band-oriented song which may make you think that we are becoming a heavier band, that’s why it is a great, raving start to the album. There’s a lots of stuff happening in this song and even after listening it, you may feel a bit exhausted. So, this is maybe our “in your face song!”.

PAHINTA TÄNÄÄN

The already released first single and also a video song which is also the most hitting stuff on the record. If there is happening a lot, even simultaneously, in “Elä”, “Pahinta tänään” is more clearly straight hitting and hopefully a catchy song. Still quite band oriented and even though there isn’t happening so much as in it predecessor , its chorus and extraordinary details with metaphors will excite you. It’s also exciting because there is some mystical feeling and it’s a kind of conflicting but basically it is about the more straight-forward and more rocking Indica.


10H MYÖHÄSSÄ

Probably one of the first songs, if not the first, which was completed. At some point it was considered as the album starter but because of its nature, it was moved a bit further. The others encouraged me to make some kind of talking part onto the C-part but it was left eventually out. It was meant to be totally weird wandering around; maybe we could try to perform it live. The song itself is more melodic than the previous two songs and it has a kind of busy feeling and quite energetic chorus. Actually it is also a bit melancholic song with clear guitars but the quite energetic and fast rhythm will make the song quite catchy.


HILJAINEN MAA

In this one the mystical feeling of the album really unleashes. Almost picturesque, although ghostly song and somehow you can see the landscape of the song when you listen to it. Hence you can say the realization of the song succeeded. The song is quite minimalistic but on the other hand there’s happening a lot in the background. It bases on the misty feeling, tiny melody and vocals but the landscape grows all the time and the melancholic feeling gets stronger. ‘Hiljainen maa’ is one of those songs where listener’s imagination creates at least a half of the song which is why I don’t want to tell too much about it, everyone should feel the atmosphere themselves while listening to it.


ASKELEET

Like the previous song, this also contains Troy’s whistles and they create much atmosphere into this one as well. I think this was the first song Troy recorded with us and we couldn’t really expect anything but we got much more. The other special thing in this song is the drum loop created in studio, a simple machine-like beat which with breaths brings rhythm to the song. Those were meant to be used in only some parts but finally we used them throughout the whole song and they bring kind of exciting hypnotic feeling to the song. Arrangement is very simple and small, quite melancholic song which I recorded nearly with tears in my eyes when I tried to get into the right mood. First with the others and then alone.


SANOJA

This is the only song in the album with which we had bigger disagreements with the arrangement. Especially Tero [Kinnunen, the recording engineer] and Tuomas thought this song should contain a kind of cavalry and we thought that would absolutely not fit in here. They whined and whimpered and finally we tried it. It turned out that it was eventually very funny and we kept it in the record. The intro took a long time to make and originally there was meant to be reversed string melody, after that some pizzicato and even human machine [= beat box?]. They did not work at all and finally we put a little bit of everything into it. Otherwise this was completed quite easily into a fast song which has that galloping beat and a lot of catchiness.


VALOISSA

This is probably the only song in this album you can call kind of summer hit. Not much gushiness in it and someone said it reminds a bit of Leevi and The Leavings. The lyrics are quite strange and not even close to my usual style, if there is such, but I like them very much. Really not much gushiness and the song is quite easy to listen but it can be even irritatingly catchy with the humming and chorus which fit perfectly to the lyrics. Sirkku played some mighty fine melodica and the harmonies contains all kinds of strange stuff but the latest reversed harmonicas make the easy and twisted feeling to grow.


TÄÄLTÄ POIS

Because of a part in the beginning of this song, Tero still owns us 50 euros. When we were demoing this, I shouted from the top of my lungs “Okei!” and we told it will be on the record. Tero didn’t believe us but there it is! I think this will work very well live because along with ‘Pahinta tänään’ this is the other band-oriented rock song on this album. Like ‘Valoissa’ this isn’t so pompous but contains a lot of great feeling instead. A bit lighter song which relies on slightly jazzy piano and catchiness but behind everything can be found nice rocking and rolling with Indica-ish light spirit.


PYROMAANI

This is one of the oldest songs on the album; it existed when we were making the first album and hasn’t changed much since then. In fact ‘Pyromaani’ is one of the first songs ever we tried to play together, so we are going really old school now! And as you may expect, the song is more traditional Indica with slightly heavier chorus and lighter verses combined to piano melody and clear vocal lines. But not exactly a straight forward song as there is a strange atmosphere in this one as well and many oddities in the lyrics but if you’re missing the old school Indica, this is as close as it gets.


HÄMÄRÄÄ

I don’t know from where the whole atmosphere of ’Hämärää’ started to evolve because it has really nothing to do with the lyrics, but I tried to get a kind of “end of war” feeling into the mood, arrangements and details. Just like you’d be in a battle field with just one flag flying and lots of fallen soldiers around you. Many clarinets bring mood into this and there are also some more exotic rhythms and exciting ethereal feeling which fits perfectly to the album’s overall style. Quite weird song overall because there are some easy hooks but on the other hand the atmosphere is quite deep and there is lots of stuff in the background. For some reason another vision of this song is a paper ball with yellow edges and I don’t know why!


EI ENÄÄ

Clearly a closing track, the whole atmosphere just tells you this is the end. Probably my favourite song on this record; after all the different moods in the album this one leaves you with a wistful but also warm and positive feeling. At least I feel very happy when this song ends and somehow completes the album for good. There’s a bit Edward Scissorhands feeling in here and some may think the lyrics are dark; some other may think they are hopeful. Again a strongly melodic and maybe quite simple song which grows quite lot in the chorus and points out quite clearly that we planned closely every detail and instrument on this record so that there would not be too much of anything.

swanheart
Posted 05 November 2008 - 00:54


Thanks so much, Laba! Yeah, I know, it's so long...! Maybe doing a little bit every week, that would keep us entertained hehe

I really, really appreciate all the work you and other people in this forum do in order to help foreign fans with Finnish... I mean..you're just so kind!

nightcat114
Posted 05 November 2008 - 04:06


Wizzu, on 3.11.2008, 18:42, said:
They are describing what the family's task is (i.e. learning the lyrics for the two albums).


They didn't do an acoustic version of Ikuinen virta in that program, they performed Valoissa.


Unless you're referring to the short clip that they did which they stopped mid-verse for the task?


Yes, the short clip that they did was the one i was referring too. They should do a full length version of it.

DrDress
Posted 06 November 2008 - 06:10


Laba, on 4.11.2008, 23:34, said:
HILJAINEN MAA

In this one the mystical feeling of the album really unleashes. Almost picturesque, although ghostly song and somehow you can see the landscape of the song when you listen to it. Hence you can say the realization of the song succeeded. The song is quite minimalistic but on the other hand there’s happening a lot in the background. It bases on the misty feeling, tiny melody and vocals but the landscape grows all the time and the melancholic feeling gets stronger. ‘Hiljainen maa’ is one of those songs where listener’s imagination creates at least a half of the song which is why I don’t want to tell too much about it, everyone should feel the atmosphere themselves while listening to it.



This is excatly how the song worked on me. Before this I thought that I was missing something, either because that I don't understand finnish or because of my limited understanding of poetry. But that mystic, sad, melancholic feeling is really the felling transmitted when I hear the song. I guess this shows how good and talented Indica are

Thanks Laba!

doctor
Posted 06 November 2008 - 09:42


Great work Laba. Thank you . The finnish language and lyrics does not interest me at all ( it is the melody and music) but I appreciate your efforts. Especially because you take care of the foreign fans.

Kold
Posted 08 November 2008 - 17:11


You are a angel, Laba :-D

Laba
Posted 09 November 2008 - 22:58


Hey guys, I think some of you are famous now. Here's a small part of an interview and translation below.

Quote
http://www.vertigo.cd/index.php?option= ... Itemid=117

Nightwishin kanssa soititte hiukan isoimmille yleisölle kuin yleensä.


– Joo. Se oli hauska, kun osa siitä porukasta tuli sitten meidän keikalle jonnekin Pihtiputaalle, vai mikä lie olikaan. Olikohan ne Tanskasta, joku oli Ranskasta. Satuttiin näkeen niitä hotellin aulassa, ja ne kyseli että missä se keikkapaikka on. Me oltiin, että tossa baarin vieressä on toi lava. Ne oli että ”mitä, ei kun oikeesti”. Ne oletti, että kun oltiin Nightwishin kanssa kierrelty stadioneilla, että ne on jotain samantyyppisiä keikkapaikkoja.


Vertigo.cd Interview 27.10.2008 (Part)


With Nightwish you played to bigger audiences than usual.

- Yeah, it was funny when some of those people came to see us in Pihtipudas, or whatever it was. I think they were from Denmark, someone was from France. We happened to see them in hotel lobby and they asked where the venue is. We told them it is that stage next to the bar. They said like "what, no, really?" They thought because we played with Nightwish in big venues, our own gigs are in similar venues.

Jonsu actually mentioned this same event earlier in an interview in Iltalehti but this is more accurate description. Probably this happened in Laihia because looks like Indica hasn't had a gig in Pihtipudas since 2006 and both Laihia and Pihtipudas are a bit "funny sounding" names.

Kold
Posted 09 November 2008 - 23:04


it was Laihia

ethsgrl
Posted 09 November 2008 - 23:08


yeah Laihia lol

doctor
Posted 10 November 2008 - 09:12


yes laihia.
We made an impression she can not forget. We discussed a lot of things that night with her and Sirkku but she said one thing i will never forget.
I asked her if it is anything we fans can do for the band ? She answered.
Just be there in our gigs it means a lot

swanheart
Posted 10 November 2008 - 14:00


doctor, on 10.11.2008, 09:12, said:
yes laihia.
We made an impression she can not forget. We discussed a lot of things that night with her and sirku but she said one thing i will never forget.
I aked her if it is anything we fans can do for the band ? She answered.
Just be there in our gigs it means a lot


she's so sweet
it must have been amazing to get to know the girls..

Magalik1
Posted 25 January 2010 - 22:39


Here's an interview made by us, I mean Indica France, of Anne-Mari Pahkala, the band's costume designer who has kindly accepted to answer our questions Hope you'll like it !

Interview with Anne-Mari Pahkala


"Could you talk a bit about you and the work you do for people who don't know it ?
I am a dressmaker and Costume designer; Bachelor of Culture and Arts. I have had my own label Illusion Costumes since year 2008. Mostly I am doing designing, but also bespoke tailoring like Tight lacing corsets, wedding dresses and evening dresses; I also do work as freelancer costumer in Finnish Broadcasting company TV2. I am collaborating with different kind of art forms like example photographers and directors, bands and burlesque artist. At the moment my top collaboration bands are IAMX and Indica.
I love visual arts like music, paintings, different emotional feelings; I love beauty and happiness; but at the same time I am enjoying things are mystic, darker and romantic. Although in this life your never know whats going to happen next....
My own Illusion Costumes studio is located in Tampere centrum in Finland and right now I am glad to have one beautiful assistant Ida Tuomisto helping me a lot with all the designs and costuming stuff.

Where do you find inspiration for your creations ?
Like I mentioned before, I do love visual arts and music a lot. I like very much surrealistic style forms example in paintings; That is really one big inspiration for me, what could be more mystical than beautiful beings in wonderlands...? I am very emotional and kind of tender people so I do get my inspiration very often from different kind of Feelings; like sadness or hopeness...Or the other way around Content If I have a designing work or order example from Indica, I will do everything in the way how Indica's style and world is. It is very deep world behind just the clothes and costumes; There is the whole era of Indica, worlds, lyrics, style, every members own personality...Out coming cd.. I need to know this all very intensively.

Since when have you been working with Indica ? How did you came to work with the band ?
I have been working with Indica since 2007. I was studying last year in my Designer school and I wanted to design the whole costuming for "some band". Well, I am really lucky I found Indica and we started our collaboration. So I made my Thesis of University of Applied Sciences for Indica; I designed stage costuming for Indica to Finnish live broadcast concert Elämä Lapselle konsertti 2007. In my Thesis idea was to analyse how is fantasy stage costuming going to work with same time as stage costume and as functional costumes. I also did personalise members own personalities and tried to find out some "new" colours for them. That was my first job with Indica.
Here's the video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbG-Fl6U ... r_embedded

How do you proceed while working with the girls : do you suggest them some clothes or do you work depending on what they ask you to do ?
It depends pf what we are doing. If we have a normally costumings project it's normal that they tell me something what they got in their mind like forms or colours, but afterwords I anyway make my own sketches and then we'll meet again and have more conversations about the style. Sometimes, when we are axample taking "only" promotional pictures the photographer might have so strong idea for the picture so I am just going to do or rent costumes what photographer want for visual words. If I am doing costuming for the musicvideo, I always do work the most with director. My last total-musicvideo costuming was Indicas Pahinta tänään musicvideo; There is about 30 historical costumes, and so much work of mine. I had three assistant in the shootings and we just ran back and forth the whole night in the forest Content I think it's my favourite musicvideo costuming so far. Indicas girls are wearing my 2008 promotional costuming (pictures annex). That Venice - carneval theme in the forest was also personally very interesting for me, because I have been lived in Venice for a while and visited those amazing Carnevall Balls; I suggest everybody to visit there if just ever got that possibility.
Here's the Pahinta Tänään video : http://www.youtube.c...h?v=xjORi6IJYpw DEAD LINK

The quality of the band's clothes is part of its identity, how do you manage to adapt the clothes' creation with their particular style ?
Even if I design costumes for the band, there's still every members personality behind that and it's always the most important thing. I would never do anything to wear if it don't fit to members personal style and to personal interests. Stage costumes just can be more extravagants than anything else! That is one big thing I love in my job. I also need to notice members personal instruments; it is really big thing when you design clothes for the band; Jonsu got the most details: She sings, plays guitarr, violin, keyboards, dancing...and what else, Well there's at least many important thing to consider.

Do you have any anecdote to tell us about the band?
No, anecdotes I unfornatelly can't do, but I can say there's many good reasons to wait for the new album! You can also follow my sites and blog about everything, I do mostly tell there what is going on and upload the newest collaboration pictures when it's the right time. If you got a minute or two I would also suggest you to visit my official website http://www.illusioncostumes.fi

Do you already have new ideas for the band ?
Of course I do! Always!

Self-portrait of Anne-Mari Pahkala Photo by David England : http://www.myspace.com/angruu/photos/21057760

Photo by Tomi Setälä http://i330.photobucket.com/albums/l437 ... 008/94.jpg : The idea for the Jonsu's skirts white shreds it's to be like a historical paper reel, with mystical Indica words by Jonsu's real handwriting. I asked Jonsu to write me a song lyrics from different songs; and after I paint printed the text to silk organza. My Designer Thesis at 2007. Picture's taking in Virgin Oil, Helsinki 2007.

Photo by Ville Juurikkala http://i330.photobucket.com/albums/l437 ... easein.jpg : These are the costumes I designed and made for Indica to Pahinta tänään musicvideo 2008.

Photo by Ville Juurikkala http://i330.photobucket.com/albums/l437 ... jonsu1.jpg

Photo by Mikko Harma http://viewmorepics....mageID=20963012 ERROR

http://www.illusioncostumes.fi
http://www.myspace.com/angruu
"I am happy to suggest you to check out my official pictureshow:"
http://www.flickr.com/photos/illusioncostumes/show/
Thank you Indica France!
Kind regards and best Wishes from Finland!
Anne-Mari Pahkala"

Wagnawok
Posted 25 February 2010 - 16:31


Did someone hear something about an interview of one of the girls? Last time (In January) Jonsu told about some news about english album(s) for february :/

Wagnawok
Posted 27 March 2010 - 21:26


Here is an interview we made of Heile Mania, photographer who made last Indica's photos. Too bad, i didn't think to ask him an answer about Heini's leg, sorry!

http://www.myspace.com/indica-france/blog/531730605

Interview with Heile Mania. March 27, 2010

......

Heile Mania, famous german photograph of 35, who especially worked with some bands and artists (Like Simone Simons or Liv Kristine for example), and to whom we owe the last official photos of Indica, accepted to answer to our questions about his work, and in particuliar his work with Indica's girl:

Heile, can you introduce yourself and your work for Indica's fans who didn't know you yet?

I am a self-employed visual artist living in Germany. Basically i work on own projects and if i have to describe my style i would call it a mixture between photography and graphic, morbid and beautiful, nightmare and fairy-tale. I also do artwork for bands sometimes.

Your work is part of a very particular and recognizable universe, where do
you find your inspiration?


Everyday life inspires me, own emotions and people in general. For sure also music is very important and have influence.

How did you came to work with Indica?Is this the continuity of your work with other bands?

I worked for other bands before and the contact to indica comes by the label. Indica is a very interesting band, i am happy that the band and the label choose me for the artwork for the new album.

It emerges from your photos' session a mysterious atmosphere, with all these doors, keys etc..Can you tell us how did you create this universe?

The postproduction of the photos is one of the reasons why they have this mystic mood. When i started to search ideas for the graphic concept i listen to the music of the band and i felt kind of that atmosphere already. Sure the album title "A Way Away" was deciding to use these door, key, bag elements. Also keys are a symbol for mystery which fits to the musik very well.

For this session you worked with Anne-Mari Pahkala,how did you work
together?


It was great to have Anne-Mari in the team, she provided all these super elements, the big keys, bags etc. And she was during the shooting very helpful when we choose the dresses.

Is it you who gave some directives for costumes or did she propose you some costumes and you worked on?

For some pictures i already had a imagination how the outfits should look and gave Anne-Mari a description via e-mail, for other ones we choose on the shooting day the clothes from the collection she brought with her.

Finally, did you have some new projects for the next months? Maybe with Indica?

At the beginning of may my first photobook will released, yipeah! And after i will have a few exhibitions. Also there will come some more artworks for bands but to early to talk about :)

We thanks again Heile Mania for answer our questions. You can find his work to this link:

His Website http://www.heilemania.com/
His myspace http://www.myspace.com/heilemania

Enjoy it


SOME NOTES.
1. ONLY A PART OF VERTIGO INTERVIEW WAS TRANSLATED, SO WILL SOMEBODY BE SO KIND TO TRANSLATE THE REST?
2. INTERVIEWS WITH HEILE MANIA AND ANNE-MARI PAHKALA ARE DIFFERENT FORM THE INTERVIEWS WITH HEILE MANIA AND ANNE-MARI PAHKALA AT http://www.indica-fans.net.

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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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 Post subject: Re: Media
PostPosted: Sun 10. Mar 2013, 21:03 
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Quick post; I've never read Jonsu's comments on the Valoissa tracks. I always thought Pyromaani sounded a bit old-school, which is probably why I like it so much. Thanks for all these posts from the former forum, Severus.

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 Post subject: Re: Media
PostPosted: Wed 3. Apr 2013, 16:00 
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Jonsu on the cover of Kotivinkki ("Ideas for Home")

Thanx to Mexico Fb fo info!

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"Dark art is not a devil thing, it's quite the opposite, it's a God thing. You truly find God on sadness, not on happiness. My darkest arts, my darkest thoughts are from heaven"
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My youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Severus479


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